Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New FPGA Program Techniques Kick ’But’

03.06.2003


Almost since they were first invented, the reconfigurable computing platforms called "Field Programmable Gate Arrays" have had a reputation: "Good idea in theory, but..." Now, a University of Southern California computer scientist says two advances her team will report June 4 "will kick a lot of but."



"Theoretically, FPGAs combine the speed of dedicated, application-optimized hardware with the ability to flexibly change chip resource allocation, so the same system can run many applications, optimized for each one," explains Mary Hall, a project leader at USC’s Information Sciences Institute and research associate professor in the computer science department at USC.

... mehr zu:
»FPGA »ISI »USC


"But FPGAs have historically been so hard to program that it’s been very hard and expensive to use these advantages. People say, ’good idea, but...’. We think the new work we report will clear away a significant number of these problems -- will kick a lot of ’but,’" she said.

Both of the papers that will be presented at the June 2-6 40th Design Automation Conference in Anaheim, California apply sophisticated new compilation tools to configure FPGAs. Hall worked with Pedro Diniz, an ISI research associate and research assistant professor in the computer science department at USC, and USC graduate students.

One of the papers, by Hall, Diniz and graduate student Heidi Ziegler, describes analysis techniques to automatically translate programs written in C, a standard language widely used for conventional computers, into pipelined FPGA designs.

The other, by Hall, Diniz and graduate student Byoungro So, shows how what has long been a painfully slow trial and error process to fit the demands of an application to the characteristics of the software in optimal fashion can be automated.

"Together, these two techniques offer a low-cost, high-speed bridge from existing application software to the FPGA platforms," Hall said.

"The key innovation in our work results from borrowing and adapting analysis and transformation techniques used in conventional multiprocessor systems." Hall explained.

"Historically, these techniques have not been used in tools that synthesize hardware designs. When our higher-level analysis is combined with the strengths of synthesis tools, such as providing estimates of the characteristics of the resulting design, it becomes possible to automatically explore a collection of hardware designs, all based on a single high-level description of the algorithm."

"We believe that with further development, this work and near-term follow-on will make FPGAs far more attractive options for many computer users."

Hall said the "automated design space exploration" techniques described in the second paper would be useful in optimizing applications to all hardware, not just FPGAs.

"If you are trying to implement an application on a platform," she explains, "you are always dealing with alternatives. You always different routes for achieving a result with the resources on the chip.

"So, for example, you need four sums. Do you want to have a single adder do it in four separate cycles, or do you want to exploit parallelism and have four adders do it at once?"

Traditionally, Hall said, the consequences of such decisions had to be worked out by hand, with assumptions verified by synthesis tools. "That can take hours or days." said said. And since each stage of the design depends on the previous decisions, the the entire design space exploration process can be much longer, perhaps weeks to months for relatively simple designs.

To optimize software in this way for fixed-property chips, such a time penalty is acceptable. "But if you have to in effect do a custom redesign of the software for each application to take advantage of FPGA flexibility," said Hall, "the potential usefulness of that flexibility is greatly reduced."

The solution described doesn’t eliminate the task of fitting software to the chip, but it speeds it up by automatically eliminating most of the worst options. "the result is not perfect," said Hall, "we estimate the performance is within a factor of two of hand-design. But we believe we can improve on that -- and we have observed reductions in design time to be on the order of a factor of 100 or more."

Hall, Diniz, and their collaborators have been developing FPGA programming under a program at ISI called Design Environment For Adaptive Computing Technology (DEFACTO, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and an ongoing project called SLATE (Compiler-Driven Design-Space Exploration for Heterogeneous Systems-on-a-Chip) funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Founded in 1972, ISI is a part of the USC School of Engineering. More than 160 graduate level researchers create new information systems on two campuses in Marina del Rey, California, and Arlington Virginia.


Eric Mankin | University of Southern Californi
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.usc.edu/isinews/stories/92.html
http://www.isi.edu/asd/defacto/index.html

Weitere Berichte zu: FPGA ISI USC

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Informationstechnologie:

nachricht Erster Modularer Supercomputer weltweit geht am Forschungszentrum Jülich in Betrieb
14.11.2017 | Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH

nachricht Online-Computerspiele verändern das Gehirn
09.11.2017 | Universität Ulm

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Informationstechnologie >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrakalte chemische Prozesse: Physikern gelingt beispiellose Vermessung auf Quantenniveau

Wissenschaftler um den Ulmer Physikprofessor Johannes Hecker Denschlag haben chemische Prozesse mit einer beispiellosen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau vermessen. Bei ihrer wissenschaftlichen Arbeit kombinierten die Forscher Theorie und Experiment und können so erstmals die Produktzustandsverteilung über alle Quantenzustände hinweg - unmittelbar nach der Molekülbildung - nachvollziehen. Die Forscher haben ihre Erkenntnisse in der renommierten Fachzeitschrift "Science" publiziert. Durch die Ergebnisse wird ein tieferes Verständnis zunehmend komplexer chemischer Reaktionen möglich, das zukünftig genutzt werden kann, um Reaktionsprozesse auf Quantenniveau zu steuern.

Einer deutsch-amerikanischen Forschergruppe ist es gelungen, chemische Prozesse mit einer nie dagewesenen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau zu vermessen. Dadurch...

Im Focus: Leoniden 2017: Sternschnuppen im Anflug?

Gemeinsame Pressemitteilung der Vereinigung der Sternfreunde und des Hauses der Astronomie in Heidelberg

Die Sternschnuppen der Leoniden sind in diesem Jahr gut zu beobachten, da kein Mondlicht stört. Experten sagen für die Nächte vom 16. auf den 17. und vom 17....

Im Focus: «Kosmische Schlange» lässt die Struktur von fernen Galaxien erkennen

Die Entstehung von Sternen in fernen Galaxien ist noch weitgehend unerforscht. Astronomen der Universität Genf konnten nun erstmals ein sechs Milliarden Lichtjahre entferntes Sternensystem genauer beobachten – und damit frühere Simulationen der Universität Zürich stützen. Ein spezieller Effekt ermöglicht mehrfach reflektierte Bilder, die sich wie eine Schlange durch den Kosmos ziehen.

Heute wissen Astronomen ziemlich genau, wie sich Sterne in der jüngsten kosmischen Vergangenheit gebildet haben. Aber gelten diese Gesetzmässigkeiten auch für...

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Pflanzenvielfalt von Wäldern aus der Luft abbilden

Produktivität und Stabilität von Waldökosystemen hängen stark von der funktionalen Vielfalt der Pflanzengemeinschaften ab. UZH-Forschenden gelang es, die Pflanzenvielfalt von Wäldern durch Fernerkundung mit Flugzeugen in verschiedenen Massstäben zu messen und zu kartieren – von einzelnen Bäumen bis hin zu ganzen Artengemeinschaften. Die neue Methode ebnet den Weg, um zukünftig die globale Pflanzendiversität aus der Luft und aus dem All zu überwachen.

Ökologische Studien zeigen, dass die Pflanzenvielfalt zentral ist für das Funktionieren von Ökosys-temen. Wälder mit einer höheren funktionalen Vielfalt –...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Technologievorsprung durch Textiltechnik

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Roboter für ein gesundes Altern: „European Robotics Week 2017“ an der Frankfurt UAS

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Börse für Zukunftstechnologien – Leichtbautag Stade bringt Unternehmen branchenübergreifend zusammen

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Technologievorsprung durch Textiltechnik

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

IHP präsentiert sich auf der productronica 2017

17.11.2017 | Messenachrichten

Roboter schafft den Salto rückwärts

17.11.2017 | Innovative Produkte