Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New FPGA Program Techniques Kick ’But’

03.06.2003


Almost since they were first invented, the reconfigurable computing platforms called "Field Programmable Gate Arrays" have had a reputation: "Good idea in theory, but..." Now, a University of Southern California computer scientist says two advances her team will report June 4 "will kick a lot of but."



"Theoretically, FPGAs combine the speed of dedicated, application-optimized hardware with the ability to flexibly change chip resource allocation, so the same system can run many applications, optimized for each one," explains Mary Hall, a project leader at USC’s Information Sciences Institute and research associate professor in the computer science department at USC.

... mehr zu:
»FPGA »ISI »USC


"But FPGAs have historically been so hard to program that it’s been very hard and expensive to use these advantages. People say, ’good idea, but...’. We think the new work we report will clear away a significant number of these problems -- will kick a lot of ’but,’" she said.

Both of the papers that will be presented at the June 2-6 40th Design Automation Conference in Anaheim, California apply sophisticated new compilation tools to configure FPGAs. Hall worked with Pedro Diniz, an ISI research associate and research assistant professor in the computer science department at USC, and USC graduate students.

One of the papers, by Hall, Diniz and graduate student Heidi Ziegler, describes analysis techniques to automatically translate programs written in C, a standard language widely used for conventional computers, into pipelined FPGA designs.

The other, by Hall, Diniz and graduate student Byoungro So, shows how what has long been a painfully slow trial and error process to fit the demands of an application to the characteristics of the software in optimal fashion can be automated.

"Together, these two techniques offer a low-cost, high-speed bridge from existing application software to the FPGA platforms," Hall said.

"The key innovation in our work results from borrowing and adapting analysis and transformation techniques used in conventional multiprocessor systems." Hall explained.

"Historically, these techniques have not been used in tools that synthesize hardware designs. When our higher-level analysis is combined with the strengths of synthesis tools, such as providing estimates of the characteristics of the resulting design, it becomes possible to automatically explore a collection of hardware designs, all based on a single high-level description of the algorithm."

"We believe that with further development, this work and near-term follow-on will make FPGAs far more attractive options for many computer users."

Hall said the "automated design space exploration" techniques described in the second paper would be useful in optimizing applications to all hardware, not just FPGAs.

"If you are trying to implement an application on a platform," she explains, "you are always dealing with alternatives. You always different routes for achieving a result with the resources on the chip.

"So, for example, you need four sums. Do you want to have a single adder do it in four separate cycles, or do you want to exploit parallelism and have four adders do it at once?"

Traditionally, Hall said, the consequences of such decisions had to be worked out by hand, with assumptions verified by synthesis tools. "That can take hours or days." said said. And since each stage of the design depends on the previous decisions, the the entire design space exploration process can be much longer, perhaps weeks to months for relatively simple designs.

To optimize software in this way for fixed-property chips, such a time penalty is acceptable. "But if you have to in effect do a custom redesign of the software for each application to take advantage of FPGA flexibility," said Hall, "the potential usefulness of that flexibility is greatly reduced."

The solution described doesn’t eliminate the task of fitting software to the chip, but it speeds it up by automatically eliminating most of the worst options. "the result is not perfect," said Hall, "we estimate the performance is within a factor of two of hand-design. But we believe we can improve on that -- and we have observed reductions in design time to be on the order of a factor of 100 or more."

Hall, Diniz, and their collaborators have been developing FPGA programming under a program at ISI called Design Environment For Adaptive Computing Technology (DEFACTO, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and an ongoing project called SLATE (Compiler-Driven Design-Space Exploration for Heterogeneous Systems-on-a-Chip) funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Founded in 1972, ISI is a part of the USC School of Engineering. More than 160 graduate level researchers create new information systems on two campuses in Marina del Rey, California, and Arlington Virginia.


Eric Mankin | University of Southern Californi
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.usc.edu/isinews/stories/92.html
http://www.isi.edu/asd/defacto/index.html

Weitere Berichte zu: FPGA ISI USC

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Informationstechnologie:

nachricht Hochautomatisiertes Fahren bei Schnee und Regen: Robuste Warnehmung dank intelligentem Sensormix
18.09.2017 | FOKUS - Fraunhofer-Institut für Offene Kommunikationssysteme

nachricht KATWARN warnt auch in Fremdsprachen
14.09.2017 | FOKUS - Fraunhofer-Institut für Offene Kommunikationssysteme

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Informationstechnologie >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wundermaterial Graphen: Gewölbt wie das Polster eines Chesterfield-Sofas

Graphen besitzt extreme Eigenschaften und ist vielseitig verwendbar. Mit einem Trick lassen sich sogar die Spins im Graphen kontrollieren. Dies gelang einem HZB-Team schon vor einiger Zeit: Die Physiker haben dafür eine Lage Graphen auf einem Nickelsubstrat aufgebracht und Goldatome dazwischen eingeschleust. Im Fachblatt 2D Materials zeigen sie nun, warum dies sich derartig stark auf die Spins auswirkt. Graphen kommt so auch als Material für künftige Informationstechnologien infrage, die auf der Verarbeitung von Spins als Informationseinheiten basieren.

Graphen ist wohl die exotischste Form von Kohlenstoff: Alle Atome sind untereinander nur in der Ebene verbunden und bilden ein Netz mit sechseckigen Maschen,...

Im Focus: Hochautomatisiertes Fahren bei Schnee und Regen: Robuste Warnehmung dank intelligentem Sensormix

Schlechte Sichtverhältnisse bei Regen oder Schnellfall sind für Menschen und hochautomatisierte Fahrzeuge eine große Herausforderung. Im europäischen Projekt RobustSENSE haben die Forscher von Fraunhofer FOKUS mit 14 Partnern, darunter die Daimler AG und die Robert Bosch GmbH, in den vergangenen zwei Jahren eine Softwareplattform entwickelt, auf der verschiedene Sensordaten von Kamera, Laser, Radar und weitere Informationen wie Wetterdaten kombiniert werden. Ziel ist, eine robuste und zuverlässige Wahrnehmung der Straßensituation unabhängig von der Komplexität und der Sichtverhältnisse zu gewährleisten. Nach der virtuellen Erprobung des Systems erfolgt nun der Praxistest, unter anderem auf dem Berliner Testfeld für hochautomatisiertes Fahren.

Starker Schneefall, ein Ball rollt auf die Fahrbahn: Selbst ein Mensch kann mitunter nicht schnell genug erkennen, ob dies ein gefährlicher Gegenstand oder...

Im Focus: Ultrakurze Momentaufnahmen der Dynamik von Elektronen in Festkörpern

Mit Hilfe ultrakurzer Laser- und Röntgenblitze haben Wissenschaftler am Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Garching bei München) Schnappschüsse der bislang kürzesten Bewegung von Elektronen in Festkörpern gemacht. Die Bewegung hielt 750 Attosekunden lang an, bevor sie abklang. Damit stellten die Wissenschaftler einen neuen Rekord auf, ultrakurze Prozesse innerhalb von Festkörpern aufzuzeichnen.

Wenn Röntgenstrahlen auf Festkörpermaterialien oder große Moleküle treffen, wird ein Elektron von seinem angestammten Platz in der Nähe des Atomkerns...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantensensoren entschlüsseln magnetische Ordnung in neuartigem Halbleitermaterial

Physiker konnte erstmals eine spiralförmige magnetische Ordnung in einem multiferroischen Material abbilden. Diese gelten als vielversprechende Kandidaten für zukünftige Datenspeicher. Der Nachweis gelang den Forschern mit selbst entwickelten Quantensensoren, die elektromagnetische Felder im Nanometerbereich analysieren können und an der Universität Basel entwickelt wurden. Die Ergebnisse von Wissenschaftlern des Departements Physik und des Swiss Nanoscience Institute der Universität Basel sowie der Universität Montpellier und Forschern der Universität Paris-Saclay wurden in der Zeitschrift «Nature» veröffentlicht.

Multiferroika sind Materialien, die gleichzeitig auf elektrische wie auch auf magnetische Felder reagieren. Die beiden Eigenschaften kommen für gewöhnlich...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

»Laser in Composites Symposium« in Aachen – von der Wissenschaft in die Anwendung

19.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Biowissenschaftler tauschen neue Erkenntnisse über molekulare Gen-Schalter aus

19.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Zwei Grad wärmer – und dann?

19.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

»Laser in Composites Symposium« in Aachen – von der Wissenschaft in die Anwendung

19.09.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Zentraler Schalter der Immunabwehr gefunden

19.09.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Neue Materialchemie für Hochleistungsbatterien

19.09.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie