Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Preliminary study finds stem cells in blood restore damaged heart muscle

21.10.2003


Proves adult stem cells from blood can repair heart



Based on promising animal data, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center say that cells taken from a patient’s own blood may one day be able to repair heart tissue that has been damaged.

While other researchers have shown that stem cells derived from bone marrow and umbilical cord blood can regenerate cardiac tissue, this study demonstrates that adult stem cells circulating in blood can also repair a heart.


In the study, published online in the current issue of the journal Circulation, the scientists found that human blood stem cells -- "master" cells that produce other types of body cells as needed -- regenerated heart muscle cells as well as artery tissue in mice whose hearts were injured.

"This takes us a big step ahead," says the lead author, Edward T. H. Yeh, M.D., professor and chair of M. D. Anderson’s Department of Cardiology. "Taking stem cells from blood is a lot easier, and a lot less painful, than taking it from bone marrow.

"For patients, it would be as simple as donating blood," he says. "We would then isolate these potent cells and give them back to the patient where the damage has occurred."

While the researchers are cardiologists and cancer specialists, and are interested in treating heart failure that occurs in up to 10 percent of patients who use chemotherapy, they say such cell-based regeneration therapy could benefit patients who have had a heart attack or other injuries that have led to heart failure. "Such a therapy cannot bring back dead heart muscle, but it can help restore weakened hearts, no matter what the cause of the damage was," says Yeh.

The research also contributes more evidence to the idea that stem cells circulating in the blood can transform themselves into different organ systems as needed to repair injury -- a notion dubbed "stem cell plasticity" that is both revolutionary and controversial. The theory, pioneered by M. D. Anderson researchers Martin Körbling, M.D., and Zeev Estrov, M.D., upsets longstanding beliefs that different kinds of tissue have their own supply of stem cells to repair damage. If correct, however, stem cell plasticity could be used to repair, or even replace tissues and organs injured by cancer, say Körbling and Estrov, who are co-authors on this study.

To conduct the study, the researchers collected a supply of human stem cells from what is generally regarded as debris from the process of banking human red blood. (After blood is collected from volunteers, it is separated into white and red blood cells, and the white blood cells are usually thrown away.) The scientists collected white blood cells and then searched for those cells that express a protein (CD34+) that is known to be associated with stem cells. They then isolated cells with the CD34+ marker from the white cells.

To test whether peripheral blood stem cells could regenerate tissue, the research team used two groups of mice that were engineered not to have an immune system, so that they would not reject human cells. One group of mice was given an artificially induced heart attack, and then immediately treated with an injection of the human stem cells. The other mice, with healthy hearts, also received the stem cell therapy.

The researchers found that in mice with an injured heart, new cardiac muscle cells (myocytes) had developed at the edge of damaged tissue, and several layers of new blood vessel tissue (endothelial and smooth muscle cells) had also grown. Little evidence of such repair was found in the mice with healthy hearts, says Yeh.

"We’ve shown that CD34+-associated cells can actually transform into three different cells used by the heart, and that tissue damage is critical to this process," he says.

Several sources for regenerative stem cells have been suggested, such as bone marrow, cord blood and embryonic cells, but this study "demonstrates that adult blood stem cells may be an alternative to these other sources of cells for myocardial regeneration," says Yeh. "And blood is a readily available source of stem cells that does not require significant manipulation."

Yeh notes that no stem cell protocol has been approved in the United States to date, and that most human trials using stem cells (those derived from bone marrow) have taken place in Europe and South America. Still, Yeh says he hopes his research can advance in the near future.


The study was funded by M. D. Anderson.

Co-authors include Estrov, a professor of the Division of Bioimmunotherapy; Körbling, a professor in the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program; and Sui Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., all of M. D. Anderson. Also collaborating on the study were Henry D. Wu, M.D, and James T. Willerson, M.D., of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Yeh carries a joint appointment at The Health Science Center and the Texas Heart Institute.

Written by Renee Twombly

Laura Sussman | EurekAlert!

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Neuer Ansatz: Nierenschädigungen therapieren, bevor Symptome auftreten
20.09.2017 | Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (UKR)

nachricht Neuer Ansatz zur Therapie der diabetischen Nephropathie
19.09.2017 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Hochpräzise Verschaltung in der Hirnrinde

Es ist noch immer weitgehend unbekannt, wie die komplexen neuronalen Netzwerke im Gehirn aufgebaut sind. Insbesondere in der Hirnrinde der Säugetiere, wo Sehen, Denken und Orientierung berechnet werden, sind die Regeln, nach denen die Nervenzellen miteinander verschaltet sind, nur unzureichend erforscht. Wissenschaftler um Moritz Helmstaedter vom Max-Planck-Institut für Hirnforschung in Frankfurt am Main und Helene Schmidt vom Bernstein-Zentrum der Humboldt-Universität in Berlin haben nun in dem Teil der Großhirnrinde, der für die räumliche Orientierung zuständig ist, ein überraschend präzises Verschaltungsmuster der Nervenzellen entdeckt.

Wie die Forscher in Nature berichten (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005), haben die...

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Wundermaterial Graphen: Gewölbt wie das Polster eines Chesterfield-Sofas

Graphen besitzt extreme Eigenschaften und ist vielseitig verwendbar. Mit einem Trick lassen sich sogar die Spins im Graphen kontrollieren. Dies gelang einem HZB-Team schon vor einiger Zeit: Die Physiker haben dafür eine Lage Graphen auf einem Nickelsubstrat aufgebracht und Goldatome dazwischen eingeschleust. Im Fachblatt 2D Materials zeigen sie nun, warum dies sich derartig stark auf die Spins auswirkt. Graphen kommt so auch als Material für künftige Informationstechnologien infrage, die auf der Verarbeitung von Spins als Informationseinheiten basieren.

Graphen ist wohl die exotischste Form von Kohlenstoff: Alle Atome sind untereinander nur in der Ebene verbunden und bilden ein Netz mit sechseckigen Maschen,...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

11. BusinessForum21-Kongress „Aktives Schadenmanagement"

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale Konferenz zum Biomining ab Sonntag in Freiberg

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die Erde und ihre Bestandteile im Fokus

21.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

11. BusinessForum21-Kongress „Aktives Schadenmanagement"

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

DFG bewilligt drei neue Forschergruppen und eine neue Klinische Forschergruppe

22.09.2017 | Förderungen Preise

Lebendiges Gewebe aus dem Drucker

22.09.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie