Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Amber waves of grain on a mission to Mars

24.10.2003


Mars came nearer to Earth this year than it has in more than 50,000 years, but a new technology could bring it closer still. Scientists have developed a fully sustainable disposal system to deal with waste on long-range space flights using a simple byproduct of wheat.



Wheat grass, an inedible part of the wheat plant, can be used to reclaim pollutants produced from burning waste on a spaceship, according to researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and NASA. The wheat grass itself would normally be trash, but now it can be put to good use in a process that moves the space program one step closer to a manned mission to Mars.

... mehr zu:
»Earth »Laboratory »Mars


The findings are in the current issue (September/October) of Energy & Fuels, a peer-reviewed bi-monthly journal of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

A manned mission to Mars has long been a goal of the space program, though it is still just a prospect of the fairly distant future. Such a mission would take about three years, depending on the proximity of Mars in its orbit.

"In these three years, you cannot have a supply from Earth, like in a space station," says Shih-Ger Chang, Ph.D., a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and lead author of the paper. "So the key is to develop a way for a sustainable supply of material to the astronauts. They need a fully regenerative life support system because they have to conserve the materials that they carry with them."

The main problem facing astronauts will be their own "biomass" — human feces and inedible portions of crops grown for food, such as wheat grass. "If they discard wheat grass or human feces into space, then they throw away nutrients," Chang says. "The astronauts need to recover everything for reuse."

One promising method to deal with this waste is to burn it. Incineration rapidly and completely converts the waste to carbon dioxide, water and minerals, and it is a thoroughly developed technology here on earth. Although plants readily absorb carbon dioxide, the major difficulty with incineration, especially in an enclosed spaceship, is that it produces other pollutants, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

We have effective ways of dealing with these pollutants on Earth but they all require expendable materials, such as activated carbon, which need to be replaced every few months.

And that’s where growing wheat in space comes into play. The inedible portion of the wheat — the wheat grass — can be converted to activated carbon onboard the space vehicle by heating it to about 600 C. Emissions from waste incineration are then sent through the activated carbon, which absorbs nitrogen oxides. These are subsequently recovered and converted to nitrogen, ammonia and nitrates. The nitrogen can be used to replace cabin pressure leakage, while the ammonia and nitrates can be used as fertilizer. When the activated carbon loses its capacity to absorb nitrogen oxides, the process starts over with new wheat grass.

In earlier research, Chang and his colleagues demonstrated that gas from the incineration of biomass contains insignificant amounts of sulfur dioxide, so they focused their efforts in this study on controlling nitrogen oxides.

Wheat for a spaceship can be grown hydroponically — in a nutrient solution exposed to artificial sunlight.

About 203 kilograms of carbon derived from wheat straw could be produced per year, which should be more than enough to sustain a crew of six astronauts, according to Chang’s calculations.

"It’s a recyclable and sustainable process," Chang says. The technology is also simple to operate and functional under microgravity conditions.

NASA is planning studies to scale up the process at its Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

Allison Byrum | American Chemical Society
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.acs.org

Weitere Berichte zu: Earth Laboratory Mars

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Physik Astronomie:

nachricht Erste Beweise für Quelle extragalaktischer Teilchen
13.07.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht MAGIC-Teleskope finden Entstehungsort von seltenem kosmischen Neutrino
13.07.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Physik

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Physik Astronomie >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Erste Beweise für Quelle extragalaktischer Teilchen

Zum ersten Mal ist es gelungen, die kosmische Herkunft höchstenergetischer Neutrinos zu bestimmen. Eine Forschungsgruppe um IceCube-Wissenschaftlerin Elisa Resconi, Sprecherin des Sonderforschungsbereichs SFB1258 an der Technischen Universität München (TUM), liefert ein wichtiges Indiz in der Beweiskette, dass die vom Neutrino-Teleskop IceCube am Südpol detektierten Teilchen mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit von einer Galaxie in vier Milliarden Lichtjahren Entfernung stammen.

Um andere Ursprünge mit Gewissheit auszuschließen, untersuchte das Team um die Neutrino-Physikerin Elisa Resconi von der TU München und den Astronom und...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetische Wirbel: Erstmals zwei magnetische Skyrmionenphasen in einem Material entdeckt

Erstmals entdeckte ein Forscherteam in einem Material zwei unabhängige Phasen mit magnetischen Wirbeln, sogenannten Skyrmionen. Die Physiker der Technischen Universitäten München und Dresden sowie von der Universität zu Köln können damit die Eigenschaften dieser für Grundlagenforschung und Anwendungen gleichermaßen interessanten Magnetstrukturen noch eingehender erforschen.

Strudel kennt jeder aus der Badewanne: Wenn das Wasser abgelassen wird, bilden sie sich kreisförmig um den Abfluss. Solche Wirbel sind im Allgemeinen sehr...

Im Focus: Neue Steuerung der Zellteilung entdeckt

Wenn eine Zelle sich teilt, werden sämtliche ihrer Bestandteile gleichmässig auf die Tochterzellen verteilt. UZH-Forschende haben nun ein Enzym identifiziert, das sicherstellt, dass auch Zellbestandteile ohne Membran korrekt aufgeteilt werden. Ihre Entdeckung eröffnet neue Möglichkeiten für die Behandlung von Krebs, neurodegenerative Krankheiten, Alterungsprozessen und Virusinfektionen.

Man kennt es aus der Küche: Werden Aceto balsamico und Olivenöl miteinander vermischt, trennen sich die beiden Flüssigkeiten. Runde Essigtropfen formen sich,...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Interdisziplinäre Konferenz: Diabetesforscher und Bioingenieure diskutieren Forschungskonzepte

13.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Feintuning für Oberflächen

12.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Materialien für eine Nachhaltige Wasserwirtschaft – MachWas-Konferenz in Frankfurt am Main

11.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Interdisziplinäre Konferenz: Diabetesforscher und Bioingenieure diskutieren Forschungskonzepte

13.07.2018 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Maschinelles Lernen: Neue Methode ermöglicht genaue Extrapolation

13.07.2018 | Informationstechnologie

Fachhochschule Südwestfalen entwickelt innovative Zinklamellenbeschichtung

13.07.2018 | Materialwissenschaften

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics