Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Better understanding of cell renewal and cellular quality control

09.12.2015

The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft/DFG) has approved 11 million Euro for the next four years for establishing a CRC on selective autophagy under the lead of Goethe University.

The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft/DFG) has approved 11 million Euro for the next four years for establishing a CRC on selective autophagy under the lead of Goethe University. Autophagy literally means "self-eating" and refers to a sophisticated system in which cellular waste is specifically detected and removed.

It contributes to regular cell renewal, secures quality control and protects against diseases. Defects in this pathway can promote cancer development and neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson, and contribute to infectious diseases and inflammatory reactions. The objective of the CRC is a better understanding of autophagy at the molecular and cellular level. In future, the researchers hope to be able to specifically target autophagy for improving the therapy of diverse diseases.

Professor Birgitta Wolff, President of the University, congratulated the researchers: “Well done to Ivan Dikic and his team for achieving this important milestone. The research planned within the CRC forms a promising basis for the development of new and more effective therapies. We are particularly pleased that we will be joining forces with Mainz University, the Institute of Molecular Biology in Mainz and the Georg-Speyer-Haus in the CRC – a further sign of the vitality of our regional partnerships.”

Autophagy is conserved from simple organisms such as yeast up to complex ones like humans. Typical targets for autophagy are harmful or superfluous proteins - it degrades for example aggregated proteins, which can otherwise lead to severe damage and cell death, as observed in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Even entire cell organelles and invading pathogens such as bacteria or viruses can be eliminated via this pathway. The building blocks generated through this degradation process are recycled, which is why autophagy also functions as a survival strategy in times of low energy supply.

Autophagy is a highly complex and precisely regulated process which requires a concerted action by numerous players: The target substrate needs to be specifically recognized and surrounded by membranes to form what is known as the autophagosome. Autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes, which are cell organelles filled with digestive enzymes, finally enabling the breakdown of all cargo into the individual building blocks.

“The enormous significance of autophagy for the pathophysiology of diseases has only been recognized in the past decade. As a result, research activity in this field has increased rapidly”, explains Professor Ivan Dikic, CRC Speaker and Director of the Institute of Biochemistry II at Goethe University. “By strategic recruitments over the past five years, we have succeeded in developing Frankfurt into a centre for autophagy research. Now we are in a position to address many of the unanswered questions: What triggers autophagy? How does the cell select targets for autophagy? How does this pathway crosstalk to other cellular mechanisms and how is it involved in the pathogenesis of human diseases?”

Meanwhile it is known that the role of autophagy strongly depends on the cellular context: In healthy tissues, it prevents the emergence of cancer cells. At the same time, however, cancer cells capitalize on autophagy to overcome bottlenecks in nutrient supply, which occur as a result of rapid tumour growth. The researchers are now analysing this complex interaction. So far, little is known about the interplay of autophagy with other mechanisms, such as cellular trafficking (endocytosis), programmed cell death (apoptosis) and the ubiquitination system, which marks proteins for degradation in the proteasome.

Within the newly established CRC, researchers will study autophagy at the level of molecules, cells and model organisms. It is the first large-scale collaborative project in this field in Germany and allows scientists in Frankfurt and Mainz to position themselves in an internationally highly competitive field. A broad line-up of disciplines is needed to tackle the open questions, and therefore, within the CRC, structural biologists have teamed up with biochemists, cell biologists and clinicians. New insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying autophagy will be directly transferred to model systems for human diseases.

At Goethe University, the three faculties of Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Pharmacy, and Medicine, and the cross-disciplinary Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (BMLS) are participating in the CRC. Partners outside the University are the Institute for Pathobiochemistry at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Prof. Dr. Christian Behl is Vice Speaker of the CRC), the Georg-Speyer-Haus in Frankfurt and the Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH in Mainz.

Further information: Prof. Ivan Dikic, Institute of Biochemistry II, University Hospital Frankfurt, Tel.: (069) 6301-5652, Ivan.Dikic@biochem2.de.

Goethe University is a research-oriented university in the European financial centre Frankfurt founded in 1914 with purely private funds by liberally-oriented Frankfurt citizens. It is dedicated to research and education under the motto "Science for Society" and to this day continues to function as a "citizens’ university". Many of the early benefactors were Jewish. Over the past 100 years, Goethe University has done pioneering work in the social and sociological sciences, chemistry, quantum physics, brain research and labour law. It gained a unique level of autonomy on 1 January 2008 by returning to its historic roots as a privately funded university. Today, it is among the top ten in external funding and among the top three largest universities in Germany, with three clusters of excellence in medicine, life sciences and the humanities.

Publisher: The President of Goethe University
Editor: Dr. Anke Sauter, Science Editor, International Communication, Tel: +49(0)69 798-12477, Fax +49(0)69 798-761 12531, sauter@pvw.uni-frankfurt.de
Internet: www.uni-frankfurt.de

Dr. Anne Hardy | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Förderungen Preise:

nachricht Innovative Werkstoffe für Rotorblätter
26.03.2019 | Leibniz Universität Hannover

nachricht Haensel AMS und Universität Amsterdam starten Innovationswettbewerb für Dynamic Pricing
21.03.2019 | Haensel AMS GmbH

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Förderungen Preise >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Saxony5 und Industrie 4.0 Modellfabrik präsentieren sich auf Hannover Messe

Vom 1. bis 4. April 2019 ist die HTW Dresden mit der Industrie 4.0 Modellfabrik und dem Projekt Saxony5 auf der Hannover Messe vertreten. Am Gemeinschaftstand der sächsischen Hochschulen für angewandte Forschung (HAW) „Forschung für die Zukunft“ stellen die Dresdner Forscher aktuelle Projekte zum kollaborativen Arbeiten und deren Anwendungen in der Industrie vor.

Virtuell können die Besucher von Hannover aus auf dem Tablet ihre Züge gegen den kollaborativen Roboter YuMi, der in der Modellfabrik in Dresden steht, setzen....

Im Focus: Hochdruckwasserstrahlen zum flächigen Materialabtrag von hochfesten Werkstoffen erprobt

Beim Fräsen hochfester Werkstoffe wie Oxidkeramik oder Sondermetalle – und besonders bei der Schruppbearbeitung – verschleißen Werkzeuge schnell. Für Unternehmen ist die Bearbeitung dieser Werkstoffe deshalb mit hohen Kosten verbunden. Im Projekt »HydroMill« hat das Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT aus Aachen mit seinen Projektpartnern nun gezeigt, dass sich der Hochdruckwasserstrahl zum flächigen Materialabtrag von hochfesten Werkstoffen eignet. War der Einsatz von Wasserstrahlen bislang auf die Schneidbearbeitung beschränkt, zeigen die Projektergebnisse, wie sich hochfeste Werkstoffe kosten- und ressourcenschonender als bisher flächig abtragen lassen.

Diese neue und zur konventionellen Schruppbearbeitung alternative Anwendung der Wasserstrahlbearbeitung untersuchten die Aachener Ingenieure gemeinsam mit...

Im Focus: Die Zähmung der Lichtschraube

Wissenschaftler vom DESY und MPSD erzeugen in Festkörpern hohe-Harmonische Lichtpulse mit geregeltem Polarisationszustand, indem sie sich die Kristallsymmetrie und attosekundenschnelle Elektronendynamik zunutze machen. Die neu etablierte Technik könnte faszinierende Anwendungen in der ultraschnellen Petahertz-Elektronik und in spektroskopischen Untersuchungen neuartiger Quantenmaterialien finden.

Der nichtlineare Prozess der Erzeugung hoher Harmonischer (HHG) in Gasen ist einer der Grundsteine der Attosekundenwissenschaft (eine Attosekunde ist ein...

Im Focus: The taming of the light screw

DESY and MPSD scientists create high-order harmonics from solids with controlled polarization states, taking advantage of both crystal symmetry and attosecond electronic dynamics. The newly demonstrated technique might find intriguing applications in petahertz electronics and for spectroscopic studies of novel quantum materials.

The nonlinear process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in gases is one of the cornerstones of attosecond science (an attosecond is a billionth of a...

Im Focus: Magnetische Mikroboote

Nano- und Mikrotechnologie sind nicht nur für medizinische Anwendungen wie in der Wirkstofffreisetzung vielversprechende Kandidaten, sondern auch für die Entwicklung kleiner Roboter oder flexibler integrierter Sensoren. Wissenschaftler des Max-Planck-Instituts für Polymerforschung (MPI-P) haben mit einer neu entwickelten Methode magnetische Mikropartikel hergestellt, die den Weg für den Bau von Mikromotoren oder die Zielführung von Medikamenten im menschlichen Körper, wie z.B. zu einem Tumor, ebnen könnten. Die Herstellung solcher Strukturen sowie deren Bewegung kann einfach durch Magnetfelder gesteuert werden und findet daher Anwendung in einer Vielzahl von Bereichen.

Die magnetischen Eigenschaften eines Materials bestimmen, wie dieses Material auf das Vorhandensein eines Magnetfeldes reagiert. Eisenoxid ist der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Industrie 4.0 - Herausforderungen & Wege in der Ingenieurausbildung

26.03.2019 | Veranstaltungen

Größte nationale Tagung 2019 für Nuklearmedizin in Bremen

21.03.2019 | Veranstaltungen

6. Magdeburger Brand- und Explosionsschutztage vom 25. bis 26.3. 2019

21.03.2019 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Industrie 4.0 - Herausforderungen & Wege in der Ingenieurausbildung

26.03.2019 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Saxony5 und Industrie 4.0 Modellfabrik präsentieren sich auf Hannover Messe

26.03.2019 | HANNOVER MESSE

Laserbearbeitung ist Kopfsache – LZH auf der Hannover Messe 2019

26.03.2019 | HANNOVER MESSE

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics