Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Picturing the future of skin cancer diagnosis


Detecting skin cancer early saves lives, but is a job for specialists. A new European system based on confocal imaging promises to improve detection and diagnosis rates by 20 per cent and to speed up the whole process considerably.

Skin cancer is on the increase. Recent statistics for Germany show that some 10 to 12 people in every 100,000 get the disease every year. Alarmingly, this figure is growing at the rate of five to ten per cent annually. From the same group, some 140 will also get non-melanoma or less serious skin cancers.

“Diagnosis of skin cancers can take weeks, depending on the health system,” says Dr Jafer Sheblee, coordinator of the IST project EDISCIM. “The process involves visits to a general practitioner and a hospital specialist. With our new system, we hope to replace these visits with just one visit and by detecting skin cancer as early as possible, to offer patients the most complete treatment.”

Doctors can choose from some 40 different imaging techniques to detect and diagnose skin cancer, the simplest being a magnifying glass. Most techniques evaluate external skin features, such as colour or morphology. “But doctors need to look deeper into the basal layers, at least one millimetre down, to be sure of their diagnosis,” says Dr Sheblee.

The original idea for using confocal microscopy to look deeper into skin came from German company Siemens. The technology involves illumination of a single point in a sample with a laser and imaging of the same point by opto-mechanical means. When Siemens dropped out of the project, the remaining partners sought a replacement. In stepped UK firm VisiTech International.

“Confocal microscopy allows you to optically section through objects,” says Dr Sheblee. “It’s like a biopsy without the painful physical cuts and resulting scars, looking at layers slice by slice.” The technology has been around for 50 years, but only recently been used in the life sciences area.

Because it calls on lasers and high-end imaging, confocal technology is expensive. One project goal was to reduce the manufacture costs – by stripping away everything not needed for skin diagnosis, redesigning optical components and producing a user-friendly design. “We can cut these costs by a factor of ten, resulting in a 20,000-euro machine that is affordable for many outpatient centres.”

Trials at two university hospitals – in Regensburg, Germany, with experienced dermatologists, and in Brescia, Italy, with people who were not experts in the field – proved the principle of confocal imaging.

“We demonstrated our system can detect skin cancer earlier than existing techniques. It can also generate data at least as good as that achieved by a biopsy,” says the coordinator. He adds that today’s best skin cancer detection rates are 75 per cent. “Our system can reach 95 per cent, even when used by people who are not skin experts.”

Though the project has ended, the partners want to make a smaller version of their prototype system. “We hope to develop a partnership for this with our Regensburg partner,” says Dr Sheblee. He notes that confocal imaging has great potential for detecting skin cancers and expects significant take-up of the technology in the next five years.

Tara Morris | alfa
Weitere Informationen:

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Erstmals wird ein neuartiger Impfstoff gegen chronische Leukämie erprobt
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

nachricht Lüften des Geheimnisses um Präeklampsie
19.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Die Quanten-Schnüffelnase

Der Laser, der zugleich ein Detektor ist: An der TU Wien wurde ein mikroskopisch kleiner Sensor entwickelt, mit dem man gleichzeitig verschiedene Gase nachweisen kann.

Wir Menschen erschnüffeln unterschiedliche Gerüche und Düfte durch chemische Rezeptoren in unserer Nase. Doch für den technischen Nachweis von Gasen greift man...

Im Focus: „Molekül-Selfie“ enthüllt den Aufbruch einer chemischen Bindung

Wissenschaftlern des Institute of Photonic Sciences (Barcelona) ist es gelungen, die Position aller Atome eines Moleküls zu verfolgen während der Aufbruch einer der chemischen Bindungen ein einzelnes Proton freisetzt. Hierzu wurde ein am Heidelberger Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik entwickeltes Reaktionsmikroskop verwendet [Science, 21. Oktober 2016].

Man stelle sich vor, die einzelnen Atome eines Moleküls ließen sich während einer chemischen Reaktion beobachten: Wie sie sich umlagern, um eine neue Substanz...

Im Focus: Elektronik mit Licht beschleunigen

Wissenschaftler am MPQ haben mit ultrakurzen Laserpulsen die schnellsten jemals erzeugten elektrischen Ströme in Festkörpern gemessen. Die Elektronen führten in einer Sekunde achtmillionen Milliarden Schwingungen aus, ein absoluter Rekord für die Steuerung von Elektronen in Festkörpern.

Die Leistungsfähigkeit von modernen elektronischen Geräten wie Computern oder Mobilfunkgeräten wird durch die Geschwindigkeit bestimmt, mit der die...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Innovative Lösungen für multifunktionale Werkstoffe und effiziente kurze Prozessketten

IPF Dresden präsentiert sich im Science Campus der Kunststoffmesse 2016

Auf der weltgrößten Kunststoffmesse K 2016 vom 19. bis 26. Oktober 2016 in Düsseldorf präsentiert sich das Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e. V....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics

Experten treffen sich am 27. Oktober zum siebten „NORTH Regio Day on Infection“ in Braunschweig

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Sicherheit und Vertrauen in der vernetzten Welt

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Fachtagung „55. Heidelberger Grand Round“ mit internationalen Krebsexperten

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Die Quanten-Schnüffelnase

21.10.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Sterilkonnektoren der nächsten Generation

21.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Neuer Mechanismus hinter der Wirkung von Hautkrebs-Medikament Imiquimod entschlüsselt

21.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie