Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

HIV skips shrinking rafts

20.11.2001


Raft of changes: cholesterol may be involved in HIV replication.
© SPL


Rafts float in the cell membrane like grease in a washing up bowl.
© A. Ono and E.O. Freed, NIAID, NIH.


Cholesterol capping limits HIV replication.

... mehr zu:
»Aids »HIV

Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit HIV replication in cells, new research shows1. Experts doubt the drugs will become the next AIDS therapy, but the finding hints at an important role for cholesterol-rich regions in HIV infection.

Statins, widely prescribed to avert artery clogging, shrink cholesterol ’rafts’ in HIV-infected human cells, Eric Freed and Akira Ono at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland find. In the duo’s test-tube experiments, at least, this shrinkage forces the virus to jump off.


The drugs "markedly and specifically," limit the virus’ ability to copy itself, says Freed. "Virus that does form is less infectious," he adds. Although cautious about using statins, or similar drugs, as AIDS therapies, Freed thinks it’s a possibility worth investigating.

"The concept is great," says Marilyn Resh, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York - one of the first to demonstrate the link between rafts and HIV replication. But, she warns, the doses required to reproduce the effects seen in the test tube would probably be toxic.

What’s more, rafts are involved in many essential cell activities. Floating in the semi-fluid cell membrane like blobs of grease in a washing-up bowl, rafts help cells to communicate, maintain their shape and organise their surface proteins.

"If you just go in and bomb the rafts," says Resh, these functions would almost certainly be harmed.

Eric Hunter, who studies HIV replication at the University of Alabama in Birmingham agrees. But he points out that HIV-positive patients are often given statins to counteract the side-effects of some HIV drugs. "It would certainly be worth looking at [HIV-postitive] patients under statin treatment," he says.

Raft building

Rafts are a new and important area of HIV research. They provide a unique insight into how the virus copies itself. "There are so many aspects of how [HIV] assembles itself that we don’t understand," says Resh.

"Rafts have piqued the interest of a broad range of researchers," says Hunter. He cautions that the link to HIV replication may be more fundamental, relying simply on cholesterol.

Rafts come together when cells join to communicate - notably immune system T-cells that are targeted by HIV. So Freed’s team is investigating whether they are involved in the spread of virus as well. "They could facilitate the transmission of virus from one cell to another," says Freed.

References
  1. Ono, A. & Freed, E. O.. Plasma membrane rafts play a critical role in HIV-1 assembly and release. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98, 13925 - 13930, (2001).


TOM CLARKE | © Nature News Service
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.nature.com/nsu/011122/011122-8.html

Weitere Berichte zu: Aids HIV

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Neues Hydrogel verbessert die Wundheilung
25.04.2017 | Universität Leipzig

nachricht Konfetti im Gehirn: Steuerung wichtiger Immunzellen bei Hirnkrankheiten geklärt
24.04.2017 | Universitätsklinikum Freiburg

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoskopie auf dem Chip: Mikroskopie in HD-Qualität

Neue Erfindung der Universitäten Bielefeld und Tromsø (Norwegen)

Physiker der Universität Bielefeld und der norwegischen Universität Tromsø haben einen Chip entwickelt, der super-auflösende Lichtmikroskopie, auch...

Im Focus: Löschbare Tinte für den 3-D-Druck

Im 3-D-Druckverfahren durch Direktes Laserschreiben können Mikrometer-große Strukturen mit genau definierten Eigenschaften geschrieben werden. Forscher des Karlsruher Institus für Technologie (KIT) haben ein Verfahren entwickelt, durch das sich die 3-D-Tinte für die Drucker wieder ‚wegwischen‘ lässt. Die bis zu hundert Nanometer kleinen Strukturen lassen sich dadurch wiederholt auflösen und neu schreiben - ein Nanometer entspricht einem millionstel Millimeter. Die Entwicklung eröffnet der 3-D-Fertigungstechnik vielfältige neue Anwendungen, zum Beispiel in der Biologie oder Materialentwicklung.

Beim Direkten Laserschreiben erzeugt ein computergesteuerter, fokussierter Laserstrahl in einem Fotolack wie ein Stift die Struktur. „Eine Tinte zu entwickeln,...

Im Focus: Leichtbau serientauglich machen

Immer mehr Autobauer setzen auf Karosserieteile aus kohlenstofffaserverstärktem Kunststoff (CFK). Dennoch müssen Fertigungs- und Reparaturkosten weiter gesenkt werden, um CFK kostengünstig nutzbar zu machen. Das Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) hat daher zusammen mit der Volkswagen AG und fünf weiteren Partnern im Projekt HolQueSt 3D Laserprozesse zum automatisierten Besäumen, Bohren und Reparieren von dreidimensionalen Bauteilen entwickelt.

Automatisiert ablaufende Bearbeitungsprozesse sind die Grundlage, um CFK-Bauteile endgültig in die Serienproduktion zu bringen. Ausgerichtet an einem...

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

„Microbiology and Infection“ - deutschlandweit größte Fachkonferenz in Würzburg

25.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Berührungslose Schichtdickenmessung in der Qualitätskontrolle

25.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Forschungsexpedition „Meere und Ozeane“ mit dem Ausstellungsschiff MS Wissenschaft

24.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

„Microbiology and Infection“ - deutschlandweit größte Fachkonferenz in Würzburg

25.04.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Auf dem Weg zur lückenlosen Qualitätsüberwachung in der gesamten Lieferkette

25.04.2017 | Verkehr Logistik

Digitalisierung bringt Produktion zurück an den Standort Deutschland

25.04.2017 | Wirtschaft Finanzen