Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

HIV skips shrinking rafts

20.11.2001


Raft of changes: cholesterol may be involved in HIV replication.
© SPL


Rafts float in the cell membrane like grease in a washing up bowl.
© A. Ono and E.O. Freed, NIAID, NIH.


Cholesterol capping limits HIV replication.

... mehr zu:
»Aids »HIV

Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit HIV replication in cells, new research shows1. Experts doubt the drugs will become the next AIDS therapy, but the finding hints at an important role for cholesterol-rich regions in HIV infection.

Statins, widely prescribed to avert artery clogging, shrink cholesterol ’rafts’ in HIV-infected human cells, Eric Freed and Akira Ono at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland find. In the duo’s test-tube experiments, at least, this shrinkage forces the virus to jump off.


The drugs "markedly and specifically," limit the virus’ ability to copy itself, says Freed. "Virus that does form is less infectious," he adds. Although cautious about using statins, or similar drugs, as AIDS therapies, Freed thinks it’s a possibility worth investigating.

"The concept is great," says Marilyn Resh, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York - one of the first to demonstrate the link between rafts and HIV replication. But, she warns, the doses required to reproduce the effects seen in the test tube would probably be toxic.

What’s more, rafts are involved in many essential cell activities. Floating in the semi-fluid cell membrane like blobs of grease in a washing-up bowl, rafts help cells to communicate, maintain their shape and organise their surface proteins.

"If you just go in and bomb the rafts," says Resh, these functions would almost certainly be harmed.

Eric Hunter, who studies HIV replication at the University of Alabama in Birmingham agrees. But he points out that HIV-positive patients are often given statins to counteract the side-effects of some HIV drugs. "It would certainly be worth looking at [HIV-postitive] patients under statin treatment," he says.

Raft building

Rafts are a new and important area of HIV research. They provide a unique insight into how the virus copies itself. "There are so many aspects of how [HIV] assembles itself that we don’t understand," says Resh.

"Rafts have piqued the interest of a broad range of researchers," says Hunter. He cautions that the link to HIV replication may be more fundamental, relying simply on cholesterol.

Rafts come together when cells join to communicate - notably immune system T-cells that are targeted by HIV. So Freed’s team is investigating whether they are involved in the spread of virus as well. "They could facilitate the transmission of virus from one cell to another," says Freed.

References
  1. Ono, A. & Freed, E. O.. Plasma membrane rafts play a critical role in HIV-1 assembly and release. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98, 13925 - 13930, (2001).


TOM CLARKE | © Nature News Service
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.nature.com/nsu/011122/011122-8.html

Weitere Berichte zu: Aids HIV

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Lymphdrüsenkrebs programmiert Immunzellen zur Förderung des eigenen Wachstums um
22.02.2018 | Wilhelm Sander-Stiftung

nachricht Forscher entdecken neuen Signalweg zur Herzmuskelverdickung
22.02.2018 | Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

Mit Hilfe einer neuen Lasertechnologie haben es Physiker vom Labor für Attosekundenphysik der LMU und des MPQ geschafft, Attosekunden-Lichtblitze mit hoher Intensität und Photonenenergie zu produzieren. Damit konnten sie erstmals die Interaktion mehrere Photonen in einem Attosekundenpuls mit Elektronen aus einer inneren atomaren Schale beobachten konnten.

Wer die ultraschnelle Bewegung von Elektronen in inneren atomaren Schalen beobachten möchte, der benötigt ultrakurze und intensive Lichtblitze bei genügend...

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

Eine Gruppe von Forschern um Andrea Cavalleri am Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie (MPSD) in Hamburg hat eine Methode demonstriert, die es erlaubt die interatomaren Kräfte eines Festkörpers detailliert auszumessen. Ihr Artikel Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, nun online in Nature veröffentlich, erläutert, wie Terahertz-Laserpulse die Atome eines Festkörpers zu extrem hohen Auslenkungen treiben können.

Die zeitaufgelöste Messung der sehr unkonventionellen atomaren Bewegungen, die einer Anregung mit extrem starken Lichtpulsen folgen, ermöglichte es der...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Verlässliche Quantencomputer entwickeln

Internationalem Forschungsteam gelingt wichtiger Schritt auf dem Weg zur Lösung von Zertifizierungsproblemen

Quantencomputer sollen künftig algorithmische Probleme lösen, die selbst die größten klassischen Superrechner überfordern. Doch wie lässt sich prüfen, dass der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Von festen Körpern und Philosophen

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Spannungsfeld Elektromobilität

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2018

21.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

23.02.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Wirt oder Gast? Proteomik gibt neue Aufschlüsse über Reaktion von Rifforganismen auf Umweltstress

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Wie Zellen unterschiedlich auf Stress reagieren

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics