Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Smart bricks could monitor buildings, save lives

13.06.2003


Chang Liu, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, led the team that developed a "smart brick" that could monitor a building’s health and save lives.


A "smart brick" developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign could monitor a building’s health and save lives.

"This innovation could change the face of the construction industry," said Chang Liu, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Illinois. "We are living with more and more smart electronics all around us, but we still live and work in fairly dumb buildings. By making our buildings smarter, we can improve both our comfort and safety."

In work performed through the university’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Liu and graduate student Jon Engel have combined sensor fusion, signal processing, wireless technology and basic construction material into a multi-modal sensor package that can report building conditions to a remote operator.



The prototype has a thermistor, two-axis accelerometer, multiplexer, transmitter, antenna and battery hidden inside a brick. Built into a wall, the brick could monitor a building’s temperature, vibration and movement. Such information could be vital to firefighters battling a blazing skyscraper, or to rescue workers ascertaining the soundness of an earthquake-damaged structure.

"Our proof-of-concept brick is just one example of where you can have the sensor, signal processor, wireless communication link and battery packaged in one compact unit," Liu said. "You also could embed the sensor circuitry in concrete blocks, laminated beams, structural steel and many other building materials."

To extend battery life, the brick could transmit building conditions at regular intervals, instead of operating continuously, Liu said. The battery could also be charged through the brick by an inductive coil, similar to those used in electric toothbrushes and certain artificial heart pumps.

The researchers are currently using off-the-shelf components in their smart bricks, so there is "lots of room for making the sensor package smaller," Engel said. "Ultimately, we would like to fit everything onto one chip, and then put that chip on a piece of plastic, instead of silicon, to make it more robust."

Silicon is a rigid, brittle material, which can easily crack or break. "Sensor packages built on flexible substrates would not only be more resilient," Engel said, "they would offer additional versatility. For example, you could wrap a flexible sensor around the iron reinforcing bars that strengthen concrete and then monitor the strain."

Liu and Engel have already crafted such sensors by depositing metal films on flexible polymer substrates. Dubbed "smart skin" by its inventors, the sensor material can be wrapped around any surface of interest, such as a robotic finger. "While a typical tactile sensor can only measure surface roughness, our sensor material can determine roughness, hardness, temperature and conductivity," Liu said. "The combined input gives you a much better idea of the type of material being touched."

The researchers’ smart skin is fabricated at the university’s Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory. Although the skin is not yet wireless, Engel is working on the analog-to-digital conversion process to utilize existing wireless technology.

The smart bricks, however, are fully wireless. In addition to keeping tabs on a building’s health, applications include monitoring nurseries, daycares and senior homes, and creating interactive "smart toys" that respond to the touch of a child.

"In a smart doll, for example, sensor capability would distinguish between caressing and slapping, allowing the doll to react accordingly," Liu said. "In the gaming industry, wireless sensors attached to a person’s arms and legs could replace the conventional joystick and allow a ’couch potato’ to get some physical exercise while playing video games such as basketball or tennis. The opportunities seem endless."


The National Science Foundation funded the work.

James E. Kloeppel | EurekAlert!
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.uiuc.edu/

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Architektur Bauwesen:

nachricht Modernes Architektenhaus mit landestypischen Design-Elementen
15.02.2017 | Bau-Fritz GmbH & Co. KG, seit 1896

nachricht Großprojekte: Auf den Start kommt es an - Projekt zur Optimierung komplexer Bauvorhaben gestartet
03.02.2017 | Technische Universität Braunschweig

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Architektur Bauwesen >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig von diesen teuren Medikamenten profitieren, wird intensiv an deren Verbesserung gearbeitet. Forschern um Prof. Thomas Valerius an der Christian Albrechts Universität Kiel gelang es nun, innovative Antikörper mit verbesserter Wirkung zu entwickeln.

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig...

Im Focus: Durchbruch mit einer Kette aus Goldatomen

Einem internationalen Physikerteam mit Konstanzer Beteiligung gelang im Bereich der Nanophysik ein entscheidender Durchbruch zum besseren Verständnis des Wärmetransportes

Einem internationalen Physikerteam mit Konstanzer Beteiligung gelang im Bereich der Nanophysik ein entscheidender Durchbruch zum besseren Verständnis des...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: Hoch wirksamer Malaria-Impfstoff erfolgreich getestet

Tübinger Wissenschaftler erreichen Impfschutz von bis zu 100 Prozent – Lebendimpfstoff unter kontrollierten Bedingungen eingesetzt

Tübinger Wissenschaftler erreichen Impfschutz von bis zu 100 Prozent – Lebendimpfstoff unter kontrollierten Bedingungen eingesetzt

Im Focus: Sensoren mit Adlerblick

Stuttgarter Forscher stellen extrem leistungsfähiges Linsensystem her

Adleraugen sind extrem scharf und sehen sowohl nach vorne, als auch zur Seite gut – Eigenschaften, die man auch beim autonomen Fahren gerne hätte. Physiker der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Die Welt der keramischen Werkstoffe - 4. März 2017

20.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Schwerstverletzungen verstehen und heilen

20.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

ANIM in Wien mit 1.330 Teilnehmern gestartet

17.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

20.02.2017 | Medizin Gesundheit

Multikristalline Siliciumsolarzelle mit 21,9 % Wirkungsgrad – Weltrekord zurück am Fraunhofer ISE

20.02.2017 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Wie Viren ihren Lebenszyklus mit begrenzten Mitteln effektiv sicherstellen

20.02.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie