Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

HIV skips shrinking rafts

20.11.2001


Raft of changes: cholesterol may be involved in HIV replication.
© SPL


Rafts float in the cell membrane like grease in a washing up bowl.
© A. Ono and E.O. Freed, NIAID, NIH.


Cholesterol capping limits HIV replication.

... mehr zu:
»Aids »HIV

Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit HIV replication in cells, new research shows1. Experts doubt the drugs will become the next AIDS therapy, but the finding hints at an important role for cholesterol-rich regions in HIV infection.

Statins, widely prescribed to avert artery clogging, shrink cholesterol ’rafts’ in HIV-infected human cells, Eric Freed and Akira Ono at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland find. In the duo’s test-tube experiments, at least, this shrinkage forces the virus to jump off.


The drugs "markedly and specifically," limit the virus’ ability to copy itself, says Freed. "Virus that does form is less infectious," he adds. Although cautious about using statins, or similar drugs, as AIDS therapies, Freed thinks it’s a possibility worth investigating.

"The concept is great," says Marilyn Resh, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York - one of the first to demonstrate the link between rafts and HIV replication. But, she warns, the doses required to reproduce the effects seen in the test tube would probably be toxic.

What’s more, rafts are involved in many essential cell activities. Floating in the semi-fluid cell membrane like blobs of grease in a washing-up bowl, rafts help cells to communicate, maintain their shape and organise their surface proteins.

"If you just go in and bomb the rafts," says Resh, these functions would almost certainly be harmed.

Eric Hunter, who studies HIV replication at the University of Alabama in Birmingham agrees. But he points out that HIV-positive patients are often given statins to counteract the side-effects of some HIV drugs. "It would certainly be worth looking at [HIV-postitive] patients under statin treatment," he says.

Raft building

Rafts are a new and important area of HIV research. They provide a unique insight into how the virus copies itself. "There are so many aspects of how [HIV] assembles itself that we don’t understand," says Resh.

"Rafts have piqued the interest of a broad range of researchers," says Hunter. He cautions that the link to HIV replication may be more fundamental, relying simply on cholesterol.

Rafts come together when cells join to communicate - notably immune system T-cells that are targeted by HIV. So Freed’s team is investigating whether they are involved in the spread of virus as well. "They could facilitate the transmission of virus from one cell to another," says Freed.

References
  1. Ono, A. & Freed, E. O.. Plasma membrane rafts play a critical role in HIV-1 assembly and release. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98, 13925 - 13930, (2001).


TOM CLARKE | © Nature News Service
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.nature.com/nsu/011122/011122-8.html

Weitere Berichte zu: Aids HIV

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Modernste Diagnostik eröffnet neue Perspektiven für eine "personalisierte“ Medizin
14.08.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

nachricht Ist Salz besser als sein Ruf?
10.08.2018 | Universitätsspital Bern

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neue interaktive Software: Maschinelles Lernen macht Autodesigns aerodynamischer

Neue Software verwendet erstmals maschinelles Lernen um Strömungsfelder um interaktiv designbare 3D-Objekte zu berechnen. Methode wird auf der renommierten SIGGRAPH-Konferenz vorgestellt

Wollen Ingenieure oder Designer die aerodynamischen Eigenschaften eines neu gestalteten Autos, eines Flugzeugs oder anderer Objekte testen, lassen sie den...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Der Roboter als „Tankwart“: TU Graz entwickelt robotergesteuertes Schnellladesystem für E-Fahrzeuge

Eine Weltneuheit präsentieren Forschende der TU Graz gemeinsam mit Industriepartnern: Den Prototypen eines robotergesteuerten CCS-Schnellladesystems für Elektrofahrzeuge, das erstmals auch das serielle Laden von Fahrzeugen in unterschiedlichen Parkpositionen ermöglicht.

Für elektrisch angetriebene Fahrzeuge werden weltweit hohe Wachstumsraten prognostiziert: 2025, so die Prognosen, wird es jährlich bereits 25 Millionen...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: Der „TRiC” bei der Aktinfaltung

Damit Proteine ihre Aufgaben in Zellen wahrnehmen können, müssen sie richtig gefaltet sein. Molekulare Assistenten, sogenannte Chaperone, unterstützen Proteine dabei, sich in ihre funktionsfähige, dreidimensionale Struktur zu falten. Während die meisten Proteine sich bis zu einem bestimmten Grad ohne Hilfe falten können, haben Forscher am Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie nun gezeigt, dass Aktin komplett von den Chaperonen abhängig ist. Aktin ist das am häufigsten vorkommende Protein in höher entwickelten Zellen. Das Chaperon TRiC wendet einen bislang noch nicht beschriebenen Mechanismus für die Proteinfaltung an. Die Studie wurde im Fachfachjournal Cell publiziert.

Bei Aktin handelt es sich um das am häufigsten vorkommende Protein in höher entwickelten Zellen, das bei Prozessen wie Zellstabilisation, Zellteilung und...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Das Architekturmodell in Zeiten der Digitalen Transformation

14.08.2018 | Veranstaltungen

EEA-ESEM Konferenz findet an der Uni Köln statt

13.08.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Digitalisierung in der chemischen Industrie

09.08.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Neue interaktive Software: Maschinelles Lernen macht Autodesigns aerodynamischer

14.08.2018 | Informationstechnologie

Der ängstliche Nao - Wenn Menschen emotional auf Roboter reagieren

14.08.2018 | Gesellschaftswissenschaften

Gebirge in Bewegung

14.08.2018 | Geowissenschaften

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics