Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Digging Deeper Below Antarctica's Lake Vida

16.09.2009
Antarctica's Lake Vida, a geologic curiosity that is essentially an ice bottle of brine, is home to some of the oldest and coldest living organisms on Earth.

Perpetually covered by more than 60 feet of ice, the brine below -- water that is five to seven times more salty than seawater -- has been found to be home to cryobiological microbes some 2,800 years old which were revived after a gradual thaw.

That widely reported finding came in 2002 from Peter Doran, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. But the discovery raised many new questions. Now, Doran and his department colleague Fabien Kenig with collaborators from the Nevada-based Desert Research Institute will return to Lake Vida late next year for more exploration, funded by a $1.1 million National Science Foundation grant.

Doran and Kenig plan to perform the first-ever drilling entirely through Lake Vida's thick ice cap, into the brine, and down into sediment below, retrieving about 10 feet or more of core sample for analysis.

"The main goal is to get into that brine pocket and the sediment beneath it to both document and define the ecosystem that's there today, and the history of that ecosystem," Doran said.

The sediment samples could yield clues about life in such an extreme environment dating back thousands of years, which could help geoscientists draw a better picture of processes that occur as the Earth moves into colder periods.

"If we took, for example, a Wisconsin lake and started turning the temperatures down during a climatic downturn, what is the impact on the lake's ecosystem and what strategies are used by living things to survive this extremely cold brine?" Doran said of the salty liquid that hovers around 10 degrees Fahrenheit year-round. "There are few examples on Earth of things shown to live in that water temperature."

A University of Wisconsin group will drill the ice hole, but special care will be required in preparing the site. A tent will be partitioned to provide both a drilling site cover and adjacent laboratory to analyze samples. It will be sort of like setting up a hospital operating room in the Antarctic cold, with the drill requiring the sanitary cleanliness of a surgeon's scalpel to prevent any surface contaminants from ruining samples.

Kenig, an organic geochemist, will study the lake's carbon and organic chemistry as well as molecular fossils in the sediment core. These preserved organic compounds will point to changes in the ecosystem as the lake froze.

"As this environment was isolated for some time, we need to be very cautious not to introduce any external elements that could bias our samples," Kenig said. To assure sample purity, nothing plastic or rubber will be used in the drilling and all equipment penetrating the lake water and sediment will be sterilized.

While specially preserved samples will be shipped back to UIC and the Desert Research Institute for later analysis, some work, such as microbial counts, will be done on site. Doran's previous on-site research at Lake Vida found in the ice the highest concentration of nitrous oxide -- "laughing gas" -- of any ecosystem on Earth. It was a clue that would make any scientist smile.

"This gas is produced by microbes," Doran said. "That was a hint that we had a viable ecosystem there."

The NSF award is funded under the federal government's economic stimulus plan, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Paul Francuch | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uic.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Abrupt cloud clearing events over southeast Atlantic Ocean are new piece in climate puzzle
23.07.2018 | University of Kansas

nachricht Global study of world's beaches shows threat to protected areas
19.07.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 467 km/h in Los Angeles: TUM-Hyperloop-Team bleibt Weltmeister

Mit grandiosen 467 Stundenkilometern ist die dritte Kapsel des WARR-Hyperloop-Teams in Los Angeles durch die Teströhre auf dem Firmengelände von SpaceX gerast. Die Studierenden der Technischen Universität München (TUM) bleiben damit auch im dritten Hyperloop Pod Wettbewerb in Los Angeles ungeschlagen und halten den Geschwindigkeitsrekord für den Hyperloop Prototyp.

Der SpaceX-Gründer Elon Musk hatte die „Hyperloop Pod Competition“ 2015 ins Leben gerufen. Der Hyperloop ist das Konzept eines Transportsystems, bei dem sich...

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: Rostocker Forscher entwickeln autonom fahrende Kräne

Industriepartner kommen aus sechs Ländern

Autonom fahrende, intelligente Kräne und Hebezeuge – dieser Ingenieurs-Traum könnte in den nächsten drei Jahren zur Wirklichkeit werden. Forscher aus dem...

Im Focus: Superscharfe Bilder von der neuen Adaptiven Optik des VLT

Das Very Large Telescope (VLT) der ESO hat das erste Licht mit einem neuen Modus Adaptiver Optik erreicht, die als Lasertomografie bezeichnet wird – und hat in diesem Rahmen bemerkenswert scharfe Testbilder vom Planeten Neptun, von Sternhaufen und anderen Objekten aufgenommen. Das bahnbrechende MUSE-Instrument kann ab sofort im sogenannten Narrow-Field-Modus mit dem adaptiven Optikmodul GALACSI diese neue Technik nutzen, um Turbulenzen in verschiedenen Höhen in der Erdatmosphäre zu korrigieren. Damit ist jetzt möglich, Bilder vom Erdboden im sichtbaren Licht aufzunehmen, die schärfer sind als die des NASA/ESA Hubble-Weltraumteleskops. Die Kombination aus exquisiter Bildschärfe und den spektroskopischen Fähigkeiten von MUSE wird es den Astronomen ermöglichen, die Eigenschaften astronomischer Objekte viel detaillierter als bisher zu untersuchen.

Das MUSE-Instrument (kurz für Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) am Very Large Telescope (VLT) der ESO arbeitet mit einer adaptiven Optikeinheit namens GALACSI. Dabei kommt auch die Laser Guide Stars Facility, kurz ...

Im Focus: Diamant – ein unverzichtbarer Werkstoff der Fusionstechnologie

Forscher am KIT entwickeln Fenstereinheiten mit Diamantscheiben für Fusionsreaktoren – Neue Scheibe mit Rekorddurchmesser von 180 Millimetern

Klimafreundliche und fast unbegrenzte Energie aus dem Fusionskraftwerk – für dieses Ziel kooperieren Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler weltweit. Bislang...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Natur in der Stadt – was sie leistet und wie wir sie schützen können

23.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Stadtklima verbessern, Energiemix optimieren, sauberes Trinkwasser bereitstellen

19.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Innovation – the name of the game

18.07.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Suchmaschine für «Smart Wood»

23.07.2018 | Informationstechnologie

Das Geheimnis der Höhlenkrebse entschlüsselt

23.07.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Natur in der Stadt – was sie leistet und wie wir sie schützen können

23.07.2018 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics