Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Climate change increases stress, need for restoration on grazed public lands

14.11.2012
Eight researchers in a new report have suggested that climate change is causing additional stress to many western rangelands, and as a result land managers should consider a significant reduction, or in some places elimination of livestock and other large animals from public lands.

A growing degradation of grazing lands could be mitigated if large areas of Bureau of Land Management and USDA Forest Service lands became free of use by livestock and "feral ungulates" such as wild horses and burros, and high populations of deer and elk were reduced, the group of scientists said.

This would help arrest the decline and speed the recovery of affected ecosystems, they said, and provide a basis for comparative study of grazing impacts under a changing climate. The direct economic and social impacts might also be offset by a higher return on other ecosystem services and land uses, they said, although the report focused on ecology, not economics.

Their findings were reported today in Environmental Management, a professional journal published by Springer.

"People have discussed the impacts of climate change for some time with such topics as forest health or increased fire," said Robert Beschta, a professor emeritus in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, and lead author on this study.

"However, the climate effects on rangelands and other grazing lands have received much less interest," he said. "Combined with the impacts of grazing livestock and other animals, this raises serious concerns about soil erosion, loss of vegetation, changes in hydrology and disrupted plant and animal communities. Entire rangeland ecosystems in the American West are getting lost in the shuffle."

Livestock use affects a far greater proportion of BLM and Forest Service lands than do roads, timber harvest and wildfires combined, the researchers said in their study. But effort to mitigate the pervasive effects of livestock has been comparatively minor, they said, even as climatic impacts intensify.

Although the primary emphasis of this analysis is on ecological considerations, the scientists acknowledged that the changes being discussed would cause some negative social, economic and community disruption.

"If livestock grazing on public lands were discontinued or curtailed significantly, some operations would see reduced incomes and ranch values, some rural communities would experience negative economic impacts, and the social fabric of those communities could be altered," the researchers wrote in their report, citing a 2002 study.

Among the observations of this report:
In the western U.S., climate change is expected to intensify even if greenhouse gas emissions are dramatically reduced.

Among the threats facing ecosystems as a result of climate change are invasive species, elevated wildfire occurrence, and declining snowpack.

Federal land managers have begun to adapt to climate-related impacts, but not the combined effects of climate and hooved mammals, or ungulates.

Climate impacts are compounded from heavy use by livestock and other grazing ungulates, which cause soil erosion, compaction, and dust generation; stream degradation; higher water temperatures and pollution; loss of habitat for fish, birds and amphibians; and desertification.

Encroachment of woody shrubs at the expense of native grasses and other plants can occur in grazed areas, affecting pollinators, birds, small mammals and other native wildlife.

Livestock grazing and trampling degrades soil fertility, stability and hydrology, and makes it vulnerable to wind erosion. This in turn adds sediments, nutrients and pathogens to western streams.

Water developments and diversion for livestock can reduce streamflows and increase water temperatures, degrading habitat for fish and aquatic invertebrates.
Grazing and trampling reduces the capacity of soils to sequester carbon, and through various processes contributes to greenhouse warming.

Domestic livestock now use more than 70 percent of the lands managed by the BLM and Forest Service, and their grazing may be the major factor negatively affecting wildlife in 11 western states. In the West, about 175 taxa of freshwater fish are considered imperiled due to habitat-related causes.

Removing or significantly reducing grazing is likely to be far more effective, in cost and success, than piecemeal approaches to address some of these concerns in isolation.

The advent of climate change has significantly added to historic and contemporary problems that result from cattle and sheep ranching, the report said, which first prompted federal regulations in the 1890s.

Wild horses and burros are also a significant problem, this report suggested, and high numbers of deer and elk occur in portions of the West, partially due to the loss or decline of large predators such as cougars and wolves. Restoring those predators might also be part of a comprehensive recovery plan, the researchers said.

The problems are sufficiently severe, this group of researchers concluded, that they believe the burden of proof should be shifted. Those using public lands for livestock production should have to justify the continuation of ungulate grazing, they said.

Collaborators on this study included researchers from the University of Wyoming, Geos Institute, Prescott College, and other agencies.

Editor's Note: Digital images are available to illustrate this story.

Hart Mountain, Oregon, cattle grazing in 1989: http://bit.ly/YxTK1J

Hart Mountain, Oregon, stream and rangeland recovery in 2010: http://bit.ly/REI9K6

Grazing impacts in Montana, USDA Forest Service land: http://bit.ly/VvCA5l
Grazing impacts in Wyoming, BLM land: http://bit.ly/QiXH9m
The study the story is based on is available online, on or after 11/14/12: http://bit.ly/PJux3q

Robert Beschta | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.oregonstate.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Upcycling 'fast fashion' to reduce waste and pollution
03.04.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: TU Chemnitz präsentiert weltweit einzigartige Pilotanlage für nachhaltigen Leichtbau

Wickelprinzip umgekehrt: Orbitalwickeltechnologie soll neue Maßstäbe in der großserientauglichen Fertigung komplexer Strukturbauteile setzen

Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter des Bundesexzellenzclusters „Technologiefusion für multifunktionale Leichtbaustrukturen" (MERGE) und des Instituts für...

Im Focus: Smart Wireless Solutions: EU-Großprojekt „DEWI“ liefert Innovationen für eine drahtlose Zukunft

58 europäische Industrie- und Forschungspartner aus 11 Ländern forschten unter der Leitung des VIRTUAL VEHICLE drei Jahre lang, um Europas führende Position im Bereich Embedded Systems und dem Internet of Things zu stärken. Die Ergebnisse von DEWI (Dependable Embedded Wireless Infrastructure) wurden heute in Graz präsentiert. Zu sehen war eine Fülle verschiedenster Anwendungen drahtloser Sensornetzwerke und drahtloser Kommunikation – von einer Forschungsrakete über Demonstratoren zur Gebäude-, Fahrzeug- oder Eisenbahntechnik bis hin zu einem voll vernetzten LKW.

Was vor wenigen Jahren noch nach Science-Fiction geklungen hätte, ist in seinem Ansatz bereits Wirklichkeit und wird in Zukunft selbstverständlicher Teil...

Im Focus: Weltweit einzigartiger Windkanal im Leipziger Wolkenlabor hat Betrieb aufgenommen

Am Leibniz-Institut für Troposphärenforschung (TROPOS) ist am Dienstag eine weltweit einzigartige Anlage in Betrieb genommen worden, mit der die Einflüsse von Turbulenzen auf Wolkenprozesse unter präzise einstellbaren Versuchsbedingungen untersucht werden können. Der neue Windkanal ist Teil des Leipziger Wolkenlabors, in dem seit 2006 verschiedenste Wolkenprozesse simuliert werden. Unter Laborbedingungen wurden z.B. das Entstehen und Gefrieren von Wolken nachgestellt. Wie stark Luftverwirbelungen diese Prozesse beeinflussen, konnte bisher noch nicht untersucht werden. Deshalb entstand in den letzten Jahren eine ergänzende Anlage für rund eine Million Euro.

Die von dieser Anlage zu erwarteten neuen Erkenntnisse sind wichtig für das Verständnis von Wetter und Klima, wie etwa die Bildung von Niederschlag und die...

Im Focus: Nanoskopie auf dem Chip: Mikroskopie in HD-Qualität

Neue Erfindung der Universitäten Bielefeld und Tromsø (Norwegen)

Physiker der Universität Bielefeld und der norwegischen Universität Tromsø haben einen Chip entwickelt, der super-auflösende Lichtmikroskopie, auch...

Im Focus: Löschbare Tinte für den 3-D-Druck

Im 3-D-Druckverfahren durch Direktes Laserschreiben können Mikrometer-große Strukturen mit genau definierten Eigenschaften geschrieben werden. Forscher des Karlsruher Institus für Technologie (KIT) haben ein Verfahren entwickelt, durch das sich die 3-D-Tinte für die Drucker wieder ‚wegwischen‘ lässt. Die bis zu hundert Nanometer kleinen Strukturen lassen sich dadurch wiederholt auflösen und neu schreiben - ein Nanometer entspricht einem millionstel Millimeter. Die Entwicklung eröffnet der 3-D-Fertigungstechnik vielfältige neue Anwendungen, zum Beispiel in der Biologie oder Materialentwicklung.

Beim Direkten Laserschreiben erzeugt ein computergesteuerter, fokussierter Laserstrahl in einem Fotolack wie ein Stift die Struktur. „Eine Tinte zu entwickeln,...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Internationaler Tag der Immunologie - 29. April 2017

28.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Kampf gegen multiresistente Tuberkulose – InfectoGnostics trifft MYCO-NET²-Partner in Peru

28.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

123. Internistenkongress: Traumata, Sprachbarrieren, Infektionen und Bürokratie – Herausforderungen

27.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Über zwei Millionen für bessere Bordnetze

28.04.2017 | Förderungen Preise

Symbiose-Bakterien: Vom blinden Passagier zum Leibwächter des Wollkäfers

28.04.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Wie Pflanzen ihre Zucker leitenden Gewebe bilden

28.04.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie