Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Climate change increases stress, need for restoration on grazed public lands

14.11.2012
Eight researchers in a new report have suggested that climate change is causing additional stress to many western rangelands, and as a result land managers should consider a significant reduction, or in some places elimination of livestock and other large animals from public lands.

A growing degradation of grazing lands could be mitigated if large areas of Bureau of Land Management and USDA Forest Service lands became free of use by livestock and "feral ungulates" such as wild horses and burros, and high populations of deer and elk were reduced, the group of scientists said.

This would help arrest the decline and speed the recovery of affected ecosystems, they said, and provide a basis for comparative study of grazing impacts under a changing climate. The direct economic and social impacts might also be offset by a higher return on other ecosystem services and land uses, they said, although the report focused on ecology, not economics.

Their findings were reported today in Environmental Management, a professional journal published by Springer.

"People have discussed the impacts of climate change for some time with such topics as forest health or increased fire," said Robert Beschta, a professor emeritus in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, and lead author on this study.

"However, the climate effects on rangelands and other grazing lands have received much less interest," he said. "Combined with the impacts of grazing livestock and other animals, this raises serious concerns about soil erosion, loss of vegetation, changes in hydrology and disrupted plant and animal communities. Entire rangeland ecosystems in the American West are getting lost in the shuffle."

Livestock use affects a far greater proportion of BLM and Forest Service lands than do roads, timber harvest and wildfires combined, the researchers said in their study. But effort to mitigate the pervasive effects of livestock has been comparatively minor, they said, even as climatic impacts intensify.

Although the primary emphasis of this analysis is on ecological considerations, the scientists acknowledged that the changes being discussed would cause some negative social, economic and community disruption.

"If livestock grazing on public lands were discontinued or curtailed significantly, some operations would see reduced incomes and ranch values, some rural communities would experience negative economic impacts, and the social fabric of those communities could be altered," the researchers wrote in their report, citing a 2002 study.

Among the observations of this report:
In the western U.S., climate change is expected to intensify even if greenhouse gas emissions are dramatically reduced.

Among the threats facing ecosystems as a result of climate change are invasive species, elevated wildfire occurrence, and declining snowpack.

Federal land managers have begun to adapt to climate-related impacts, but not the combined effects of climate and hooved mammals, or ungulates.

Climate impacts are compounded from heavy use by livestock and other grazing ungulates, which cause soil erosion, compaction, and dust generation; stream degradation; higher water temperatures and pollution; loss of habitat for fish, birds and amphibians; and desertification.

Encroachment of woody shrubs at the expense of native grasses and other plants can occur in grazed areas, affecting pollinators, birds, small mammals and other native wildlife.

Livestock grazing and trampling degrades soil fertility, stability and hydrology, and makes it vulnerable to wind erosion. This in turn adds sediments, nutrients and pathogens to western streams.

Water developments and diversion for livestock can reduce streamflows and increase water temperatures, degrading habitat for fish and aquatic invertebrates.
Grazing and trampling reduces the capacity of soils to sequester carbon, and through various processes contributes to greenhouse warming.

Domestic livestock now use more than 70 percent of the lands managed by the BLM and Forest Service, and their grazing may be the major factor negatively affecting wildlife in 11 western states. In the West, about 175 taxa of freshwater fish are considered imperiled due to habitat-related causes.

Removing or significantly reducing grazing is likely to be far more effective, in cost and success, than piecemeal approaches to address some of these concerns in isolation.

The advent of climate change has significantly added to historic and contemporary problems that result from cattle and sheep ranching, the report said, which first prompted federal regulations in the 1890s.

Wild horses and burros are also a significant problem, this report suggested, and high numbers of deer and elk occur in portions of the West, partially due to the loss or decline of large predators such as cougars and wolves. Restoring those predators might also be part of a comprehensive recovery plan, the researchers said.

The problems are sufficiently severe, this group of researchers concluded, that they believe the burden of proof should be shifted. Those using public lands for livestock production should have to justify the continuation of ungulate grazing, they said.

Collaborators on this study included researchers from the University of Wyoming, Geos Institute, Prescott College, and other agencies.

Editor's Note: Digital images are available to illustrate this story.

Hart Mountain, Oregon, cattle grazing in 1989: http://bit.ly/YxTK1J

Hart Mountain, Oregon, stream and rangeland recovery in 2010: http://bit.ly/REI9K6

Grazing impacts in Montana, USDA Forest Service land: http://bit.ly/VvCA5l
Grazing impacts in Wyoming, BLM land: http://bit.ly/QiXH9m
The study the story is based on is available online, on or after 11/14/12: http://bit.ly/PJux3q

Robert Beschta | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.oregonstate.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Managing an endangered river across the US-Mexico border
18.07.2016 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The European pet trade is jeopardising the survival of rare reptile species
13.07.2016 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung - UFZ

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forschen in 15 Kilometern Höhe - Einsatz des Flugzeuges HALO wird weiter gefördert

Das moderne Höhen-Forschungsflugzeug HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) wird auch in Zukunft für Projekte zur Atmosphären- und Erdsystemforschung eingesetzt werden können: Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) bewilligte jetzt Fördergelder von mehr als 11 Millionen Euro für die nächste Phase des HALO Schwerpunktprogramms (SPP 1294) in den kommenden drei Jahren. Die Universität Leipzig ist neben der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der Technischen Universität Dresden federführend bei diesem DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm.

Die Universität Leipzig wird von der Fördersumme knapp 6 Millionen Euro zur Durchführung von zwei Forschungsprojekten mit HALO sowie zur Deckung der hohen...

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Rekord in der Hochdruckforschung: 1 Terapascal erstmals erreicht und überschritten

Einem internationalen Forschungsteam um Prof. Dr. Natalia Dubrovinskaia und Prof. Dr. Leonid Dubrovinsky von der Universität Bayreuth ist es erstmals gelungen, im Labor einen Druck von 1 Terapascal (= 1.000.000.000.000 Pascal) zu erzeugen. Dieser Druck ist dreimal höher als der Druck, der im Zentrum der Erde herrscht. Die in 'Science Advances' veröffentlichte Studie eröffnet neue Forschungsmöglichkeiten für die Physik und Chemie der Festkörper, die Materialwissenschaft, die Geophysik und die Astrophysik.

Extreme Drücke und Temperaturen, die im Labor mit hoher Präzision erzeugt und kontrolliert werden, sind ideale Voraussetzungen für die Physik, Chemie und...

Im Focus: Graphen von der Rolle: Serienfertigung von Elektronik aus 2D-Nanomaterialien

Graphen, Kohlenstoff in zweidimensionaler Struktur, wird seit seiner Entdeckung im Jahr 2004 als ein möglicher Werkstoff der Zukunft gehandelt: Sein geringes Gewicht, die extreme Festigkeit, vor allem aber seine hohe thermische und elektrische Leitfähigkeit wecken Hoffnungen, Graphen bald für vollkommen neue Geräte und Technologien einsetzen zu können. Einen ersten Schritt gehen jetzt die Forscher im EU-Forschungsprojekt »HEA2D«: Ziel ist es, das 2D-Nanomaterial von einer Kupferfolie durch ein Rolle-zu-Rolle-Verfahren auf Kunststofffolien und -bauteile zu übertragen. Auf diese Weise soll eine Serienfertigung elektronischer und opto-elektronischer Komponenten auf Graphenbasis möglich werden.

Besonders interessiert an hochleistungsfähiger Elektronik aus 2D-Materialien ist die Automobilindustrie, die diese in Schaltern mit transparenten Leiterbahnen,...

Im Focus: Menschen können einzelnes Photon sehen

Forscher am Wiener Institut für Molekulare Pathologie (IMP) und an der Rockefeller University in New York wiesen erstmals nach, dass Menschen ein einzelnes Photon wahrnehmen können. Für ihre Experimente verwendeten sie eine Quanten-Lichtquelle und kombinierten sie mit einem ausgeklügelten psycho-physikalischen Ansatz. Das Wissenschaftsjournal “Nature Communications” veröffentlicht die Ergebnisse in seiner aktuellen Ausgabe.

Trotz zahreicher Studien, die seit über siebig Jahren zu diesem Thema durchgeführt wurden, konnte die absolute Untergrenze der menschlichen Sehfähigkeit bisher...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Das neue Präventionsgesetz aktiv gestalten

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Kamera für unsichtbare Felder

22.07.2016 | Physik Astronomie

3-D-Analyse von Materialien: Saarbrücker Forscher erhält renommierten US-Preis für sein Lebenswerk

22.07.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Signale der Hirnflüssigkeit steuern das Verhalten von Stammzellen im Gehirn

22.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie