Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Bats versus wind turbines

14.08.2014

Wind turbines are responsible for the death of numerous bats. In a recent study, scientists determined the origin of these animals: they do not only come from local areas but many had been already on a long migratory journey. Germany therefore bears responsibility not only for the protection of native bat populations, but also for the populations from other countries.

Wind turbines are an important component of renewable energy policies. The technology is well advanced and wind is available in abundance, particularly in northern Germany. Although the problem of transporting the electricity to the power demanding southern parts of Germany is often discussed and the aesthetics of turbines commented upon, there is another problem: the rotor blades are a deadly danger for many birds and bats.


Mainly young and female bats are killed at wind turbines.

Photo: Christian Voigt / IZW

Approximately 300,000 bats are estimated to be at risk of getting killed by German wind turbines every year, unless this risk is reduced by turning off the systems at night during the main activity hours of bats.

In a recent study, published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, a research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) identified the origin of greater noctules – a migrating bat species that is often in collisions with wind turbines in the eastern states of Germany.

More than one quarter of studied bats were not local but were on their way to their wintering grounds in Germany or southwestern Europe. They had started their flights in the northeastern range of the species in the Baltic States, Russia, Belarus or Poland.

A surprisingly large proportion of females and young animals were amongst those killed. This is especially critical for wildlife populations, because with each female their potential offspring is also missing. Bat scientist Christian Voigt from the IZW in Berlin emphasizes: “The study shows that Germany bears responsibility not only for the protection of local bats, but also for the migrating bats from other countries owing to its central location as a transit area.”

Germany lies exactly on the migration route of bats, which move to warmer regions – such as southern Germany, Switzerland or southern France – during autumn after they left their breeding areas in northeastern Europe, where females give birth to their young every spring.

Additional losses of bats at German wind turbines are particularly dramatic for these populations since unfavorable climatic conditions in their northern breeding range prevent them from successfully reproducing each year. If many of these bats die at German wind turbines, source populations in Northeastern Europe may get significantly weakened.

The method by which the researchers determined the origin of bats comes from forensic science. When a cadaver of unknown origin appears, forensic experts examine the ratio of heavy to light hydrogen in the keratin of hair – a “geographic fingerprint”. This ratio varies in the precipitation water in relation to continental gradients of ambient temperature, i.e. precipitation in northern areas are less enriched in deuterium than that of southern areas.

Humans and animals assimilate this water directly or through their food and deposit the isotopes in their body tissue. Since keratin is biologically inactive, the isotopic ratio remains constant over several months. As a geographical fingerprint it indicates the origin of a human or an animal. The method is so useful because the scientists can determine the origin of each bat without having to ring them, as is usually the case in conventional migration studies. That would truly require an immense effort.

Unfortunately, wind turbines even attract bats. During the mating season in autumn, bats swarm at conspicuous landscape features such as exposed rocks, church towers or even wind turbines, and in the latter case they may then collide with the blades. Christian Voigt is surprised that only few far-reaching measures have been taken that stop wind turbines to turn into deadly traps:

“Bats are protected under both national law and EU law, and migratory species are protected by a UN convention signed by Germany. Anyone who kills a bat on purpose can be prosecuted for a criminal offence.” There is little emphasis on making operators of wind turbines accountable for these bat accidents because increasing the share of renewable energy is a political priority. “The protection of climate and species are played off against each other – but for a comprehensive approach to environmental conservation they should really go hand in hand.”

Wind turbines and bats could actually get along well with each other: bats do not like strong wind. They are only active at wind speeds of up to six to eight meters per second. At this speed, wind turbines only just start to produce energy in an economic manner. If the turbines run only in strong wind, collisions could be avoided – as could be those between the protectors of species and climate.

Publication:
Lehnert LS, Kramer-Schadt S, Schönborn S, Lindecke O, Niermann I, Voigt CC (2014): Wind farm facilities in Germany kill noctule bats from near and far. PLOS ONE http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103106

Contact
Leibniz Institute for Zoo- and Wildlife Research (IZW)
Alfred-Kowalke-Str. 17
10315 Berlin
Germany

Christian C. Voigt
Tel.: +49 30 5168-517
painer@izw-berlin.de

Steven Seet (press officer)
Tel.: +49 30 5168-125
seet@izw-berlin.de

Background information:
The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) investigates the vitality and adaptability of wildlife populations in mammalian and avian species of outstanding ecological interest that face anthropogenic challenges. It studies the adaptive value of traits in the life cycle of wildlife, wildlife diseases and clarifies the biological basis and development of methods for the protection of threatened species. Such knowledge is a precondition for a scientifically based approach to conservation and for the development of concepts for the ecologically sustainable use of natural resources. The IZW belongs to the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (www.fv-berlin.de)

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.izw-berlin.de

Karl-Heinz Karisch | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

Weitere Berichte zu: Europe Forschungsverbund IZW Wildlife Wind bats energy species

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz:

nachricht Mit Urzeitalgen zu gesundem Wasser: Wirtschaftliches Verfahren zur Beseitigung von EDC im Abwasser
27.04.2017 | Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg

nachricht Plastik – nicht nur Müll
26.04.2017 | Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e.V.

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart Wireless Solutions: EU-Großprojekt „DEWI“ liefert Innovationen für eine drahtlose Zukunft

58 europäische Industrie- und Forschungspartner aus 11 Ländern forschten unter der Leitung des VIRTUAL VEHICLE drei Jahre lang, um Europas führende Position im Bereich Embedded Systems und dem Internet of Things zu stärken. Die Ergebnisse von DEWI (Dependable Embedded Wireless Infrastructure) wurden heute in Graz präsentiert. Zu sehen war eine Fülle verschiedenster Anwendungen drahtloser Sensornetzwerke und drahtloser Kommunikation – von einer Forschungsrakete über Demonstratoren zur Gebäude-, Fahrzeug- oder Eisenbahntechnik bis hin zu einem voll vernetzten LKW.

Was vor wenigen Jahren noch nach Science-Fiction geklungen hätte, ist in seinem Ansatz bereits Wirklichkeit und wird in Zukunft selbstverständlicher Teil...

Im Focus: Weltweit einzigartiger Windkanal im Leipziger Wolkenlabor hat Betrieb aufgenommen

Am Leibniz-Institut für Troposphärenforschung (TROPOS) ist am Dienstag eine weltweit einzigartige Anlage in Betrieb genommen worden, mit der die Einflüsse von Turbulenzen auf Wolkenprozesse unter präzise einstellbaren Versuchsbedingungen untersucht werden können. Der neue Windkanal ist Teil des Leipziger Wolkenlabors, in dem seit 2006 verschiedenste Wolkenprozesse simuliert werden. Unter Laborbedingungen wurden z.B. das Entstehen und Gefrieren von Wolken nachgestellt. Wie stark Luftverwirbelungen diese Prozesse beeinflussen, konnte bisher noch nicht untersucht werden. Deshalb entstand in den letzten Jahren eine ergänzende Anlage für rund eine Million Euro.

Die von dieser Anlage zu erwarteten neuen Erkenntnisse sind wichtig für das Verständnis von Wetter und Klima, wie etwa die Bildung von Niederschlag und die...

Im Focus: Nanoskopie auf dem Chip: Mikroskopie in HD-Qualität

Neue Erfindung der Universitäten Bielefeld und Tromsø (Norwegen)

Physiker der Universität Bielefeld und der norwegischen Universität Tromsø haben einen Chip entwickelt, der super-auflösende Lichtmikroskopie, auch...

Im Focus: Löschbare Tinte für den 3-D-Druck

Im 3-D-Druckverfahren durch Direktes Laserschreiben können Mikrometer-große Strukturen mit genau definierten Eigenschaften geschrieben werden. Forscher des Karlsruher Institus für Technologie (KIT) haben ein Verfahren entwickelt, durch das sich die 3-D-Tinte für die Drucker wieder ‚wegwischen‘ lässt. Die bis zu hundert Nanometer kleinen Strukturen lassen sich dadurch wiederholt auflösen und neu schreiben - ein Nanometer entspricht einem millionstel Millimeter. Die Entwicklung eröffnet der 3-D-Fertigungstechnik vielfältige neue Anwendungen, zum Beispiel in der Biologie oder Materialentwicklung.

Beim Direkten Laserschreiben erzeugt ein computergesteuerter, fokussierter Laserstrahl in einem Fotolack wie ein Stift die Struktur. „Eine Tinte zu entwickeln,...

Im Focus: Leichtbau serientauglich machen

Immer mehr Autobauer setzen auf Karosserieteile aus kohlenstofffaserverstärktem Kunststoff (CFK). Dennoch müssen Fertigungs- und Reparaturkosten weiter gesenkt werden, um CFK kostengünstig nutzbar zu machen. Das Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) hat daher zusammen mit der Volkswagen AG und fünf weiteren Partnern im Projekt HolQueSt 3D Laserprozesse zum automatisierten Besäumen, Bohren und Reparieren von dreidimensionalen Bauteilen entwickelt.

Automatisiert ablaufende Bearbeitungsprozesse sind die Grundlage, um CFK-Bauteile endgültig in die Serienproduktion zu bringen. Ausgerichtet an einem...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

123. Internistenkongress: Traumata, Sprachbarrieren, Infektionen und Bürokratie – Herausforderungen

27.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Jenaer Akustik-Tag: Belastende Geräusche minimieren - für den Schutz des Gehörs

27.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Ballungsräume Europas

26.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

VLC 200 GT von EMAG: Neue passgenaue Dreh-Schleif-Lösung für die Bearbeitung von Pkw-Getrieberädern

27.04.2017 | Maschinenbau

Induktive Lötprozesse von eldec: Schneller, präziser und sparsamer verlöten

27.04.2017 | Maschinenbau

Smart Wireless Solutions: EU-Großprojekt „DEWI“ liefert Innovationen für eine drahtlose Zukunft

27.04.2017 | Informationstechnologie