Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Bats versus wind turbines

14.08.2014

Wind turbines are responsible for the death of numerous bats. In a recent study, scientists determined the origin of these animals: they do not only come from local areas but many had been already on a long migratory journey. Germany therefore bears responsibility not only for the protection of native bat populations, but also for the populations from other countries.

Wind turbines are an important component of renewable energy policies. The technology is well advanced and wind is available in abundance, particularly in northern Germany. Although the problem of transporting the electricity to the power demanding southern parts of Germany is often discussed and the aesthetics of turbines commented upon, there is another problem: the rotor blades are a deadly danger for many birds and bats.


Mainly young and female bats are killed at wind turbines.

Photo: Christian Voigt / IZW

Approximately 300,000 bats are estimated to be at risk of getting killed by German wind turbines every year, unless this risk is reduced by turning off the systems at night during the main activity hours of bats.

In a recent study, published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, a research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) identified the origin of greater noctules – a migrating bat species that is often in collisions with wind turbines in the eastern states of Germany.

More than one quarter of studied bats were not local but were on their way to their wintering grounds in Germany or southwestern Europe. They had started their flights in the northeastern range of the species in the Baltic States, Russia, Belarus or Poland.

A surprisingly large proportion of females and young animals were amongst those killed. This is especially critical for wildlife populations, because with each female their potential offspring is also missing. Bat scientist Christian Voigt from the IZW in Berlin emphasizes: “The study shows that Germany bears responsibility not only for the protection of local bats, but also for the migrating bats from other countries owing to its central location as a transit area.”

Germany lies exactly on the migration route of bats, which move to warmer regions – such as southern Germany, Switzerland or southern France – during autumn after they left their breeding areas in northeastern Europe, where females give birth to their young every spring.

Additional losses of bats at German wind turbines are particularly dramatic for these populations since unfavorable climatic conditions in their northern breeding range prevent them from successfully reproducing each year. If many of these bats die at German wind turbines, source populations in Northeastern Europe may get significantly weakened.

The method by which the researchers determined the origin of bats comes from forensic science. When a cadaver of unknown origin appears, forensic experts examine the ratio of heavy to light hydrogen in the keratin of hair – a “geographic fingerprint”. This ratio varies in the precipitation water in relation to continental gradients of ambient temperature, i.e. precipitation in northern areas are less enriched in deuterium than that of southern areas.

Humans and animals assimilate this water directly or through their food and deposit the isotopes in their body tissue. Since keratin is biologically inactive, the isotopic ratio remains constant over several months. As a geographical fingerprint it indicates the origin of a human or an animal. The method is so useful because the scientists can determine the origin of each bat without having to ring them, as is usually the case in conventional migration studies. That would truly require an immense effort.

Unfortunately, wind turbines even attract bats. During the mating season in autumn, bats swarm at conspicuous landscape features such as exposed rocks, church towers or even wind turbines, and in the latter case they may then collide with the blades. Christian Voigt is surprised that only few far-reaching measures have been taken that stop wind turbines to turn into deadly traps:

“Bats are protected under both national law and EU law, and migratory species are protected by a UN convention signed by Germany. Anyone who kills a bat on purpose can be prosecuted for a criminal offence.” There is little emphasis on making operators of wind turbines accountable for these bat accidents because increasing the share of renewable energy is a political priority. “The protection of climate and species are played off against each other – but for a comprehensive approach to environmental conservation they should really go hand in hand.”

Wind turbines and bats could actually get along well with each other: bats do not like strong wind. They are only active at wind speeds of up to six to eight meters per second. At this speed, wind turbines only just start to produce energy in an economic manner. If the turbines run only in strong wind, collisions could be avoided – as could be those between the protectors of species and climate.

Publication:
Lehnert LS, Kramer-Schadt S, Schönborn S, Lindecke O, Niermann I, Voigt CC (2014): Wind farm facilities in Germany kill noctule bats from near and far. PLOS ONE http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103106

Contact
Leibniz Institute for Zoo- and Wildlife Research (IZW)
Alfred-Kowalke-Str. 17
10315 Berlin
Germany

Christian C. Voigt
Tel.: +49 30 5168-517
painer@izw-berlin.de

Steven Seet (press officer)
Tel.: +49 30 5168-125
seet@izw-berlin.de

Background information:
The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) investigates the vitality and adaptability of wildlife populations in mammalian and avian species of outstanding ecological interest that face anthropogenic challenges. It studies the adaptive value of traits in the life cycle of wildlife, wildlife diseases and clarifies the biological basis and development of methods for the protection of threatened species. Such knowledge is a precondition for a scientifically based approach to conservation and for the development of concepts for the ecologically sustainable use of natural resources. The IZW belongs to the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (www.fv-berlin.de)

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.izw-berlin.de

Karl-Heinz Karisch | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

Weitere Berichte zu: Europe Forschungsverbund IZW Wildlife Wind bats energy species

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz:

nachricht "Brauchen wir das?" Auf dem Weg zu einer umweltgerechten Bedarfsprüfung von Infrastrukturprojekten
09.08.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung - UFZ

nachricht Wenn die Tigermücke zum Problem wird
07.08.2017 | Universität Wien

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forscher entwickeln maisförmigen Arzneimittel-Transporter zum Inhalieren

Er sieht aus wie ein Maiskolben, ist winzig wie ein Bakterium und kann einen Wirkstoff direkt in die Lungenzellen liefern: Das zylinderförmige Vehikel für Arzneistoffe, das Pharmazeuten der Universität des Saarlandes entwickelt haben, kann inhaliert werden. Professor Marc Schneider und sein Team machen sich dabei die körpereigene Abwehr zunutze: Makrophagen, die Fresszellen des Immunsystems, fressen den gesundheitlich unbedenklichen „Nano-Mais“ und setzen dabei den in ihm enthaltenen Wirkstoff frei. Bei ihrer Forschung arbeiteten die Pharmazeuten mit Forschern der Medizinischen Fakultät der Saar-Uni, des Leibniz-Instituts für Neue Materialien und der Universität Marburg zusammen Ihre Forschungsergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Healthcare Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700478

Ein Medikament wirkt nur, wenn es dort ankommt, wo es wirken soll. Wird ein Mittel inhaliert, muss der Wirkstoff in der Lunge zuerst die Hindernisse...

Im Focus: Exotische Quantenzustände: Physiker erzeugen erstmals optische „Töpfe" für ein Super-Photon

Physikern der Universität Bonn ist es gelungen, optische Mulden und komplexere Muster zu erzeugen, in die das Licht eines Bose-Einstein-Kondensates fließt. Die Herstellung solch sehr verlustarmer Strukturen für Licht ist eine Voraussetzung für komplexe Schaltkreise für Licht, beispielsweise für die Quanteninformationsverarbeitung einer neuen Computergeneration. Die Wissenschaftler stellen nun ihre Ergebnisse im Fachjournal „Nature Photonics“ vor.

Lichtteilchen (Photonen) kommen als winzige, unteilbare Portionen vor. Viele Tausend dieser Licht-Portionen lassen sich zu einem einzigen Super-Photon...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Wissenschaftler beleuchten den „anderen Hochtemperatur-Supraleiter“

Eine von Wissenschaftlern des Max-Planck-Instituts für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie (MPSD) geleitete Studie zeigt, dass Supraleitung und Ladungsdichtewellen in Verbindungen der wenig untersuchten Familie der Bismutate koexistieren können.

Diese Beobachtung eröffnet neue Perspektiven für ein vertieftes Verständnis des Phänomens der Hochtemperatur-Supraleitung, ein Thema, welches die Forschung der...

Im Focus: Tests der Quantenmechanik mit massiven Teilchen

Quantenmechanische Teilchen können sich wie Wellen verhalten und mehrere Wege gleichzeitig nehmen, um an ihr Ziel zu gelangen. Dieses Prinzip basiert auf Borns Regel, einem Grundpfeiler der Quantenmechanik; eine mögliche Abweichung hätte weitreichende Folgen und könnte ein Indikator für neue Phänomene in der Physik sein. WissenschafterInnen der Universität Wien und Tel Aviv haben nun diese Regel explizit mit Materiewellen überprüft, indem sie massive Teilchen an einer Kombination aus Einzel-, Doppel- und Dreifachspalten interferierten. Die Analyse bestätigt den Formalismus der etablierten Quantenmechanik und wurde im Journal "Science Advances" publiziert.

Die Quantenmechanik beschreibt sehr erfolgreich das Verhalten von Partikeln auf den kleinsten Masse- und Längenskalen. Die offensichtliche Unvereinbarkeit...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Eröffnung der INC.worX-Erlebniswelt während der Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement-Tagung 2017

16.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Sensibilisierungskampagne zu Pilzinfektionen

15.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Anbausysteme im Wandel: Europäische Ackerbaubetriebe müssen sich anpassen

15.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Neue Einblicke in die Welt der Trypanosomen

16.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Maschinensteuerung an Anwender: Intelligentes System für mobile Endgeräte in der Fertigung

16.08.2017 | Informationstechnologie

Komfortable Software für die Genomanalyse

16.08.2017 | Informationstechnologie