Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

The World´s Thinnest Ratchet - Publication in “Nature Nanotechnology”

20.02.2013
A ratchet supports one-way traffic. One can pull it back and forth, but it only moves forwards. Mechanical ratchets, used to pull or hold heavy objects, are familiar examples. Also, some electronic devices are based on ratchets.

Transistors are made out of diodes, which rectify electrical currents: however hard one pushes electrons in both directions, they flow only in one. Now an international consortium consisting of research groups from Germany, Russia, Sweden, and the U.S., led by the experimental group of Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev from the University of Regensburg and supported by the theoretical group of Prof. Dr. Sergey Tarasenko (St. Petersburg) and Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Fabian (Regensburg), has demonstrated that electronic ratchets can be successfully scaled down to one-atom thick layers.

The researchers showed that graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, supports a ratchet motion of electrons when placed in a magnetic field. They applied terahertz laser fields to push the electrons back and forth, while the magnetic field acted as a valve to let only those electrons moving in one direction go on, stopping the others. The results of the research group are reported in an issue of “Nature Nanotechnology” (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2012.231).

Graphene may be the ultimate electronic material, possibly replacing silicon in electronic devices in the future. It has attracted worldwide attention from physicists, chemists, and engineers. Its discoverers, A. Geim and K. Novoselov, were awarded the physics Nobel Prize for it in 2010. The discovery of the ratchet motion in graphene greatly adds to the technological potential of this material and to the prospects of further miniaturization of electronic devices. Before carbon based electronics might take over from silicon many fundamental physical challenges need to be addressed.

In Regensburg, research activities on graphene are embedded in larger research programs, funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). These are a PhD program on carbon based electronics (DFG-Research Training Group GRK 1570, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Milena Grifoni) and a Collaborative Research Center (SFB 689, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Dieter Weiss) funding more than 40 PhD students, as well as projects within a DFG Priority Programm (SPP 1459, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Thomas Seyller, Chemnitz). The international cooperation on terahertz physics and technology is coordinated by the Regensburg Terahertz Center (TerZ, directed by Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev), also funded by the International Bureau of the German Ministry of Education and Research.

Title of the article in “Nature Nanotechnology”:
C. Drexler, S. Tarasenko, P. Olbrich, J. Karch, M. Hirmer, F. Müller, M. Gmitra, J. Fabian, R. Yakimova, S. Lara-Avila, S. Kubatkin, M. Wang, R. Vajtai, P. Ajayan, J. Kono, and S.D. Ganichev: Magnetic quantum ratchet effect in graphene, Nature Nanotechnology (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2012.231).
More information on the research activities on grapheme in Regensburg:
www.physik.uni-regensburg.de/forschung/gk_carbonano/
www-app.uni-regensburg.de/Fakultaeten/Physik/sfb689/
www.spp1459.uni-erlangen.de/about-spp-1459/
Press Contact:
Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev
Universität Regensburg
Faculty of Physics
TerZ – Regensburg Terahertz Center
Tel.: +49 (0)941 943-2050
Sergey.Ganichev@physik.uni-regensburg.de

Alexander Schlaak | idw
Further information:
http://www.physik.uni-regensburg.de/TerZ/

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Distant planet's interior chemistry may differ from our own
01.09.2015 | Carnegie Institution

nachricht Interstellar seeds could create oases of life
28.08.2015 | Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Universum: Simulationen am Supercomputer

Davon träumt die Wissenschaft: An einem Computer zu simulieren, wie sich das Universum bis heute entwickelt hat. Forscher aus Würzburg und Heidelberg wollen dem Traum jetzt näher kommen: Sie haben Rechenzeit im Wert von knapp fünf Millionen Euro auf einem Supercomputer bewilligt bekommen.

Der Würzburger Mathematiker Professor Christian Klingenberg und der Heidelberger Astrophysiker Professor Volker Springel haben sich Großes vorgenommen: Sie...

Im Focus: An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets

The leaves of the lotus flower, and other natural surfaces that repel water and dirt, have been the model for many types of engineered liquid-repelling surfaces. As slippery as these surfaces are, however, tiny water droplets still stick to them. Now, Penn State researchers have developed nano/micro-textured, highly slippery surfaces able to outperform these naturally inspired coatings, particularly when the water is a vapor or tiny droplets.

Enhancing the mobility of liquid droplets on rough surfaces could improve condensation heat transfer for power-plant heat exchangers, create more efficient...

Im Focus: Starke, aber zeitlich begrenzte Temperaturabkühlungen unter der Lupe

Grosse Vulkanausbrüche schleudern beträchtliche Mengen an Schwefeldioxid in die Atmosphäre, die sich in Aerosole umwandeln, in der Stratosphäre verteilen, dort einen Teil der Sonneneinstrahlung blockieren und so die Erdoberfläche für einige Jahre abkühlen.

Ein internationales Forscherteam mit Berner Beteiligung hat nun dank der Kombination von Jahrringuntersuchungen an Bäumen und Klimamodellen einen Ansatz...

Im Focus: Elektrofahrzeuge kabellos laden und entladen

Über ein kabelloses Ladesystem können Elektroautos künftig nicht nur tanken, sondern die Energie ins Stromnetz zurückspeisen. Auf diese Weise helfen sie das Netz zu stabilisieren. Das kostengünstige Ladesystem erreicht hohe Wirkungsgrade – über den vollen Leistungsbereich von 400 Watt bis 3,6 Kilowatt. Die Abstände zwischen Auto und Ladespule können bis zu 20 Zentimeter be- tragen. Auf der Internationalen Automobil Ausstellung IAA in Frankfurt stellen Fraunhofer-Forscher den Prototyp vom 15. bis 18. September 2015 vor (Halle 4, Stand D33).

Es regnet in Strömen. Wer jetzt ein dickes unhandliches Kabel zwischen Elektrofahrzeug und Ladesäule einstecken muss, wird patschnass. Doch es nützt nichts,...

Im Focus: Increasingly severe disturbances weaken world's temperate forests

Longer, more severe, and hotter droughts and a myriad of other threats, including diseases and more extensive and severe wildfires, are threatening to transform some of the world's temperate forests, a new study published in Science has found. Without informed management, some forests could convert to shrublands or grasslands within the coming decades.

"While we have been trying to manage for resilience of 20th century conditions, we realize now that we must prepare for transformations and attempt to ease...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Technologietag „Laser-Plasma-Hybridtechnologie“

01.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Kongress - Das Lebensende planen

01.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale Ökologenkonferenz zeigt Wege in eine nachhaltige Zukunft auf

01.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

moove goes Luxemburg: vitaliberty und DKV Luxembourg starten Partnerschaft für gesunde Unternehmen im Großherzogtum

01.09.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Ausbildungsstart bei Siemens - rund 160 Azubis im 1. Ausbildungsjahr an fünf mitteldeutschen Standorten

01.09.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Siemens verkauft 18 Industriegasturbinen nach Thailand

01.09.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung