Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Connecting the (quantum) dots

27.02.2013
New spin technique moves researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Delft University of Technology closer to creating the first viable high-speed quantum computer

Recent research offers a new spin on using nanoscale semiconductor structures to build faster computers and electronics. Literally.

University of Pittsburgh and Delft University of Technology researchers reveal in the Feb. 17 online issue of Nature Nanotechnology a new method that better preserves the units necessary to power lightning-fast electronics, known as qubits (pronounced CUE-bits). Hole spins, rather than electron spins, can keep quantum bits in the same physical state up to 10 times longer than before, the report finds.

"Previously, our group and others have used electron spins, but the problem was that they interacted with spins of nuclei, and therefore it was difficult to preserve the alignment and control of electron spins," said Sergey Frolov, assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy within Pitt's Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, who did the work as a postdoctoral fellow at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

Whereas normal computing bits hold mathematical values of zero or one, quantum bits live in a hazy superposition of both states. It is this quality, said Frolov, which allows them to perform multiple calculations at once, offering exponential speed over classical computers. However, maintaining the qubit's state long enough to perform computation remains a long-standing challenge for physicists.

"To create a viable quantum computer, the demonstration of long-lived quantum bits, or qubits, is necessary," said Frolov. "With our work, we have gotten one step closer."

The holes within hole spins, Frolov explained, are literally empty spaces left when electrons are taken out. Using extremely thin filaments called InSb (indium antimonide) nanowires, the researchers created a transistor-like device that could transform the electrons into holes. They then precisely placed one hole in a nanoscale box called "a quantum dot" and controlled the spin of that hole using electric fields. This approach— featuring nanoscale size and a higher density of devices on an electronic chip—is far more advantageous than magnetic control, which has been typically employed until now, said Frolov.

"Our research shows that holes, or empty spaces, can make better spin qubits than electrons for future quantum computers."

"Spins are the smallest magnets in our universe. Our vision for a quantum computer is to connect thousands of spins, and now we know how to control a single spin," said Frolov. "In the future, we'd like to scale up this concept to include multiple qubits."

Coauthors of the paper include Leo Kouwenhoven, Stevan Nadj-Perge, Vlad Pribiag, Johan van den Berg, and Ilse van Weperen of Delft University of Technology; and Sebastien Plissard and Erik Bakkers from Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands.

The paper, "Electrical control over single hole spins in nanowire quantum dots," appeared online Feb. 17 in Nature Nanotechnology. The research was supported by the Dutch Organization for Fundamental Research on Matter, the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, and the European Research Council.

Frolov and his Netherlands colleagues were recent winners of the 2012 Newcomb Cleveland Prize, an annual honor awarded to the author/s of the best research article/report appearing in Science, which is published weekly by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Read more about the award here: http://news.aaas.org/2012_annual_meeting/0215research-probing-a-quantum-phase-transition-wins-the-2011-aaas-newcomb-cleveland-prize-supported-by-affymetrix.shtml

2/26/13/mab/cjhm

B. Rose Huber | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.pitt.edu

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Suzaku, Herschel link a black-hole 'wind' to a galactic gush of star-forming gas
26.03.2015 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Tiny Bio-Robot Is a Germ Suited-Up with Graphene Quantum Dots
25.03.2015 | University of Illinois at Chicago

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neurochip für die Hirnforschung erfolgreich im Markt

Neues Mess- und Stimulationssystem nimmt die Kommunikation von Nervenzellen in Echtzeit auf und ermöglicht damit lang erhoffte Grundlagenforschung

Für die Enträtselung neurologischer und neurodegenerativer Erkrankungen wie Parkinson, Alzheimer, Depression oder verschiedene Erblindungsformen verspricht ein...

Im Focus: Klassisch oder nicht? Physik der Nanoplasmen

Die Wechselwirkung von intensiven Laserpulsen mit Partikeln auf einer Nanometer-Skala resultiert in der Erzeugung eines expandierenden Nanoplasmas.

In der Vergangenheit wurde die Dynamik eines Nanoplasmas typischerweise durch klassische Phänomene wie die thermische Emission von Elektronen beschrieben. Im...

Im Focus: Klimawandel: Nur auf der Erde, nicht auf dem Mars

Löcher in der Polkappe sind natürlichen Ursprungs

Eine Klimaerwärmung findet auf dem Mars trotz schmelzender Polkappen nicht statt. Zu diesem Ergebnis ist eine Studie der University of Arizona http://www.arizona.edu...

Im Focus: Experiment Provides the Best Look Yet at 'Warm Dense Matter' at Cores of Giant Planets

In an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists precisely measured the temperature and structure of aluminum as...

Im Focus: Energieautark und kabellos: Neuartiges Messsystem schützt Schiffe vor Ausfällen

Wie der Schiffsverkehr zuverlässiger werden kann, während gleichzeitig der Instandhaltungsaufwand sinkt, zeigt das IPH bei der Hannover Messe 2015. Gemeinsam mit Projektpartnern hat das hannoversche Forschungsinstitut ein Sensorsystem entwickelt, das den Zustand von Schiffsgetrieben permanent überwacht und so Ausfällen vorbeugt. Das Besondere: Das Überwachungssystem funktioniert drahtlos und energieautark. Der benötigte Strom wird dort erzeugt, wo er gebraucht wird – direkt am Sensor.

Autos müssen regelmäßig zum TÜV, Schiffe müssen zur Inspektion – denn wenn mitten im Verkehr der Antrieb ausfällt, ist das nicht nur ärgerlich, sondern auch...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Technologietag bei der SCHOTT AG - Neue Strukturierungstechnologien für Dünngläser

26.03.2015 | Veranstaltungen

7th Mildred Scheel Cancer Conference

26.03.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Corporate Venturing als Quelle unternehmerischer Innovationen

26.03.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Künstliche Muskeln: Gelenkiger Spinnen-Greifer für Industrieroboter passt sich dem Werkstück an

26.03.2015 | HANNOVER MESSE

Technologietag bei der SCHOTT AG - Neue Strukturierungstechnologien für Dünngläser

26.03.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Bislang bester Blick auf Staubwolke, die am Schwarzen Loch im Zentrum der Milchstraße vorbeizog

26.03.2015 | Physik Astronomie