Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Choreographing light

13.11.2012
EPFL scientists have developed an algorithm to control light patterns called "caustics" and organize them into coherent images

It's a simple, transparent acrylic plate – nothing embedded within it and nothing printed on its surface. Place it at a certain angle between a white wall and a light source, and a clear, coherent image appears of the face of Alan Turing, the famous British mathematician and father of modern computer science.


Researchers at EPFL found a way to control "caustics", patterns that appear when light hits a water surface or a transparent material. Thanks to an algorithm, they can shape a transparent object so that it reflects a coherent image.

Credit: (c) Alain Herzog

There's no magic here; the only thing at work is the relief on the plaque's surface and a natural optical phenomenon known as a "caustic," which researchers in EPFL's Computer Graphics and Geometry Laboratory have succeeded in bending to their will. Their research was presented recently at the Advances in Architectural Geometry Conference in Paris.

"With the technique that we've developed, we can compose any image we want, from a simple form such as a star to complex representations such as faces or landscapes," explains EPFL professor Mark Pauly, head of the laboratory, who conducted the study with four other scientists*.

This "caustic" effect is well known and easy to observe; a bit of sunlight shining on a pool of water produces patterns that dance on the surrounding tiles or walls. These undulating lines, apparently random, are generated by light that hits the moving surface of a pool or puddle. This effect, which is very mobile and dynamic in liquid, produces static patterns with solid transparent materials such as glass or transparent acrylic (better known as Plexiglass).

Deviated trajectories

Scientifically, this phenomenon can be explained by light refraction. When light rays hit a transparent surface, they continue their trajectory but are bent as a function of the surface geometry and optical properties of the material. The light passing through is thus not uniformly distributed. It gets concentrated in certain points, forming some zones that are more intense and others that are more shaded.

Pauly and his colleagues studied the principles of this distribution, and were able to identify the curves and undulations they would need to give to the surface in order to direct the beams of light to a desired area. They then developed an algorithm to calculate the trajectories very precisely and thus form a specific image.

One of the most interesting and eagerly awaited applications of this method is in architecture. It could be applied to display cases, windows, fountains, and ornamentations on museums and monuments. In design it could be used for decorating glasses, vases, carafes, jewelry and many other objects. It has considerable potential in other, more technical applications as well, such as automobile headlights and projectors.

See the Youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NXNAIqU8KM

*Thomas Kiser (EPFL), Michael Eigensatz (Evolute), Minh Man Nguyen (WAO) and Philippe Bompas.

Mark Pauly | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.epfl.ch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NXNAIqU8KM

Further reports about: Choreographing Choreographing light EPFL Source algorithm coherent images geometry

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Merging galaxies break radio silence
28.05.2015 | ESA/Hubble Information Centre

nachricht New Technique Speeds NanoMRI Imaging
28.05.2015 | American Institute of Physics (AIP)

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wie Solarzellen helfen, Knochenbrüche zu finden

FAU-Forscher verwenden neues Material für Röntgendetektoren

Nicht um Sonnenlicht geht es ihnen, sondern um Röntgenstrahlen: Wissenschaftler der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) haben zusammen mit...

Im Focus: Festkörper-Photonik ermöglicht extrem kurzwellige UV-Strahlung

Mit ultrakurzen Laserpulsen haben Wissenschaftler aus dem Labor für Attosekundenphysik in dünnen dielektrischen Schichten EUV-Strahlung erzeugt und die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen untersucht.

Das Jahr 1961, die Erfindung des Lasers lag erst kurz zurück, markierte den Beginn der nichtlinearen Optik und Photonik. Denn erstmals war es Wissenschaftlern...

Im Focus: Solid-state photonics goes extreme ultraviolet

Using ultrashort laser pulses, scientists in Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have demonstrated the emission of extreme ultraviolet radiation from thin dielectric films and have investigated the underlying mechanisms.

In 1961, only shortly after the invention of the first laser, scientists exposed silicon dioxide crystals (also known as quartz) to an intense ruby laser to...

Im Focus: Szenario 2050: Ein Wurmloch in Big Apple

Andy ist Physiker und wohnt in New York. Obwohl er schon seit fünf Jahren im Big Apple arbeitet, ist ihm die Stadt immer noch fremd – zu laut, zu hektisch, zu schmutzig. Wie soll das in Zukunft weitergehen? Die Antwort erfährt er prompt – und am eigenen Leib.

„New York – die Stadt, die niemals schläft.“ Lieber Franky Boy Sinatra, ich bin ganz bei Dir. Schon 1977 hattest du mit deinem Song ganz recht. Einen wichtigen...

Im Focus: Auf der Suche nach Leben in ausserirdischen Ozeanen

Grosse Ehre für Nicolas Thomas von der Universität Bern: Der Forscher wurde zum Mitglied des Kamerateams der NASA-Mission «Europa Clipper» ernannt. Mit ihrer Hilfe soll die Frage beantwortet werden, ob es in den Ozeanen des Jupiter-Mondes «Europa» Leben gibt.

Gibt es Leben im All? Antworten auf diese Frage erhofft sich die US-Weltraumbehörde NASA von der Mission «Europa Clipper». Das Ziel der in der Planungsphase...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

13. Koblenzer eLearning Tage

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Tour Eucor 2015: mehr als 700 Kilometer durch drei Länder

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Deutsches Klima-Konsortium zu den Perspektiven für die Klimaforschung bis 2025

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Siemens erstmals erfolgreich mit H-Klasse-Gasturbinen in Mexiko

28.05.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Daimler hat die größte CAD-Software Umstellung der letzten Jahrzehnte erfolgreich abgeschlossen

28.05.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Zwei Hormone für den Pollen

28.05.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie