Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Choreographing light

13.11.2012
EPFL scientists have developed an algorithm to control light patterns called "caustics" and organize them into coherent images

It's a simple, transparent acrylic plate – nothing embedded within it and nothing printed on its surface. Place it at a certain angle between a white wall and a light source, and a clear, coherent image appears of the face of Alan Turing, the famous British mathematician and father of modern computer science.


Researchers at EPFL found a way to control "caustics", patterns that appear when light hits a water surface or a transparent material. Thanks to an algorithm, they can shape a transparent object so that it reflects a coherent image.

Credit: (c) Alain Herzog

There's no magic here; the only thing at work is the relief on the plaque's surface and a natural optical phenomenon known as a "caustic," which researchers in EPFL's Computer Graphics and Geometry Laboratory have succeeded in bending to their will. Their research was presented recently at the Advances in Architectural Geometry Conference in Paris.

"With the technique that we've developed, we can compose any image we want, from a simple form such as a star to complex representations such as faces or landscapes," explains EPFL professor Mark Pauly, head of the laboratory, who conducted the study with four other scientists*.

This "caustic" effect is well known and easy to observe; a bit of sunlight shining on a pool of water produces patterns that dance on the surrounding tiles or walls. These undulating lines, apparently random, are generated by light that hits the moving surface of a pool or puddle. This effect, which is very mobile and dynamic in liquid, produces static patterns with solid transparent materials such as glass or transparent acrylic (better known as Plexiglass).

Deviated trajectories

Scientifically, this phenomenon can be explained by light refraction. When light rays hit a transparent surface, they continue their trajectory but are bent as a function of the surface geometry and optical properties of the material. The light passing through is thus not uniformly distributed. It gets concentrated in certain points, forming some zones that are more intense and others that are more shaded.

Pauly and his colleagues studied the principles of this distribution, and were able to identify the curves and undulations they would need to give to the surface in order to direct the beams of light to a desired area. They then developed an algorithm to calculate the trajectories very precisely and thus form a specific image.

One of the most interesting and eagerly awaited applications of this method is in architecture. It could be applied to display cases, windows, fountains, and ornamentations on museums and monuments. In design it could be used for decorating glasses, vases, carafes, jewelry and many other objects. It has considerable potential in other, more technical applications as well, such as automobile headlights and projectors.

See the Youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NXNAIqU8KM

*Thomas Kiser (EPFL), Michael Eigensatz (Evolute), Minh Man Nguyen (WAO) and Philippe Bompas.

Mark Pauly | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.epfl.ch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NXNAIqU8KM

Further reports about: Choreographing Choreographing light EPFL Source algorithm coherent images geometry

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Hubble survey unlocks clues to star birth in neighboring galaxy
04.09.2015 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Tiny Drops of Early Universe 'Perfect' Fluid
02.09.2015 | Brookhaven National Laboratory

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoperlen für die Stahlschmiede

Stahl gibt es seit rund 3000 Jahren und heute sogar in mehreren Tausend Variationen, und trotzdem ist er immer wieder für Überraschungen gut. Wissenschaftler des Max-Planck-Instituts für Eisenforschung in Düsseldorf haben in einem manganhaltigen Stahl nun beobachtet, dass die Legierung an linienförmigen Defekten eine andere Kristallstruktur bildet, als sie typisch ist für das Material. Sie berichten darüber im Fachjournal Science. Da sich die Länge der Liniendefekte in einem Kubikmeter Stahl auf ein Lichtjahr summieren kann, dürfte die Entdeckung große praktische Bedeutung haben. Denn von der Mikrostruktur eines Stahls hängen auch seine Eigenschaften ab.

Versetzungen können Leben retten. Solche Liniendefekte, genauer gesagt Stufenversetzungen entstehen, wenn eine Atomlage eines Kristalls unvollständig bleibt,...

Im Focus: LARA - Luftgekühlter Radnabenmotor mit hoher Drehmomentdichte auf Basis gegossener Aluminiumspulen

LARA umfasst die Entwicklung, Fertigung und Erprobung eines robusten luftgekühlten Radnabenmotors mit hoher Drehmomentdichte. Dieser kommt als Direktantrieb an allen vier Rädern eines leichten Stadtfahrzeugs als Demonstrator zum Einsatz. Wesentliche Herausforderung ist, das für die Fahrzeugnutzung im urbanen Umfeld notwendige Drehmoment bei hohen Wirkungsgraden aufzubringen und zugleich eine technologisch einfache Luftkühlung zur Abführung der thermischen Verlustleistungen umzusetzen.

Für die Wicklung des Elektromotors werden die vom Fraunhofer IFAM entwickelten gegossenen Spulen mit maximalem Nutfüllgrad eingesetzt, die zur Minimierung von...

Im Focus: Hubble survey unlocks clues to star birth in neighboring galaxy

In a survey of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope images of 2,753 young, blue star clusters in the neighboring Andromeda galaxy (M31), astronomers have found that M31 and our own galaxy have a similar percentage of newborn stars based on mass.

By nailing down what percentage of stars have a particular mass within a cluster, or the Initial Mass Function (IMF), scientists can better interpret the light...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE entwickelt hochkompakten Wechselrichter für unterbrechungsfreie Stromversorgungen

Bauteile aus Siliziumkarbid ermöglichen Wirkungsgrad von 98,7 Prozent

Forscher des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Solare Energiesysteme ISE haben einen hochkompakten und -effizienten Wechselrichter für die unterbrechungsfreie...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact Inverter for Uninterruptible Power Supplies

Silicon Carbide Components Enable Efficiency of 98.7 percent

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE have developed a highly compact and efficient inverter for use in uninterruptible power...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

HMI 4.0 in mobilen Arbeitsmaschinen

04.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Innovative Citizen – Festival für neue urbane Fertigkeiten

04.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Seilroboter mit Passagier

04.09.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

HMI 4.0 in mobilen Arbeitsmaschinen

04.09.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Hinweise auf mikrobielles Leben im Erdmantel unterhalb des Meeresbodens entdeckt

04.09.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Gleichgewichtsorgan - Flexibler Sensor

04.09.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie