Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Amber waves of grain on a mission to Mars


Mars came nearer to Earth this year than it has in more than 50,000 years, but a new technology could bring it closer still. Scientists have developed a fully sustainable disposal system to deal with waste on long-range space flights using a simple byproduct of wheat.

Wheat grass, an inedible part of the wheat plant, can be used to reclaim pollutants produced from burning waste on a spaceship, according to researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and NASA. The wheat grass itself would normally be trash, but now it can be put to good use in a process that moves the space program one step closer to a manned mission to Mars.

... mehr zu:
»Earth »Laboratory »Mars

The findings are in the current issue (September/October) of Energy & Fuels, a peer-reviewed bi-monthly journal of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

A manned mission to Mars has long been a goal of the space program, though it is still just a prospect of the fairly distant future. Such a mission would take about three years, depending on the proximity of Mars in its orbit.

"In these three years, you cannot have a supply from Earth, like in a space station," says Shih-Ger Chang, Ph.D., a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and lead author of the paper. "So the key is to develop a way for a sustainable supply of material to the astronauts. They need a fully regenerative life support system because they have to conserve the materials that they carry with them."

The main problem facing astronauts will be their own "biomass" — human feces and inedible portions of crops grown for food, such as wheat grass. "If they discard wheat grass or human feces into space, then they throw away nutrients," Chang says. "The astronauts need to recover everything for reuse."

One promising method to deal with this waste is to burn it. Incineration rapidly and completely converts the waste to carbon dioxide, water and minerals, and it is a thoroughly developed technology here on earth. Although plants readily absorb carbon dioxide, the major difficulty with incineration, especially in an enclosed spaceship, is that it produces other pollutants, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

We have effective ways of dealing with these pollutants on Earth but they all require expendable materials, such as activated carbon, which need to be replaced every few months.

And that’s where growing wheat in space comes into play. The inedible portion of the wheat — the wheat grass — can be converted to activated carbon onboard the space vehicle by heating it to about 600 C. Emissions from waste incineration are then sent through the activated carbon, which absorbs nitrogen oxides. These are subsequently recovered and converted to nitrogen, ammonia and nitrates. The nitrogen can be used to replace cabin pressure leakage, while the ammonia and nitrates can be used as fertilizer. When the activated carbon loses its capacity to absorb nitrogen oxides, the process starts over with new wheat grass.

In earlier research, Chang and his colleagues demonstrated that gas from the incineration of biomass contains insignificant amounts of sulfur dioxide, so they focused their efforts in this study on controlling nitrogen oxides.

Wheat for a spaceship can be grown hydroponically — in a nutrient solution exposed to artificial sunlight.

About 203 kilograms of carbon derived from wheat straw could be produced per year, which should be more than enough to sustain a crew of six astronauts, according to Chang’s calculations.

"It’s a recyclable and sustainable process," Chang says. The technology is also simple to operate and functional under microgravity conditions.

NASA is planning studies to scale up the process at its Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

Allison Byrum | American Chemical Society
Weitere Informationen:

Weitere Berichte zu: Earth Laboratory Mars

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Physik Astronomie:

nachricht Quantencomputer – Rechner der Zukunft?
24.10.2016 | Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG)

nachricht Lichtinduzierte Rotationen von Atomen rufen Magnetwellen hervor
24.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Physik Astronomie >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Lichtinduzierte Rotationen von Atomen rufen Magnetwellen hervor

Terahertz-Anregung ausgewählter Kristallschwingungen führt zu einem effektiven Magnetfeld, das kohärente Spindynamik antreibt

Die Kontrolle funktionaler Eigenschaften durch Licht ist eines der großen Ziele moderner Festkörperphysik und der Materialwissenschaften. Eine neue Studie...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: Magnete aus dem 3D-Drucker

Wie kann man einen Magneten bauen, der genau das gewünschte Magnetfeld hat? Die TU Wien hat eine Lösung: Erstmals können Magnete mit 3D-Drucker hergestellt werden.

Starke Magnete herzustellen ist heute technisch kein Problem. Schwierig ist es allerdings, einen Permanentmagneten zu produzieren, dessen Magnetfeld eine ganz...

Im Focus: Die Quanten-Schnüffelnase

Der Laser, der zugleich ein Detektor ist: An der TU Wien wurde ein mikroskopisch kleiner Sensor entwickelt, mit dem man gleichzeitig verschiedene Gase nachweisen kann.

Wir Menschen erschnüffeln unterschiedliche Gerüche und Düfte durch chemische Rezeptoren in unserer Nase. Doch für den technischen Nachweis von Gasen greift man...

Im Focus: „Molekül-Selfie“ enthüllt den Aufbruch einer chemischen Bindung

Wissenschaftlern des Institute of Photonic Sciences (Barcelona) ist es gelungen, die Position aller Atome eines Moleküls zu verfolgen während der Aufbruch einer der chemischen Bindungen ein einzelnes Proton freisetzt. Hierzu wurde ein am Heidelberger Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik entwickeltes Reaktionsmikroskop verwendet [Science, 21. Oktober 2016].

Man stelle sich vor, die einzelnen Atome eines Moleküls ließen sich während einer chemischen Reaktion beobachten: Wie sie sich umlagern, um eine neue Substanz...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics

Großer Hirntumor-Informationstag in Würzburg

24.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Führende Rohstoffwissenschaftler stellen auf BMBF-Statuskonferenz ihre r⁴-Forschungsarbeiten vor

24.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Futurium startet mit Pop-Up-Lab das Satellitenprogramm des STATE-Festivals

24.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Im Regenwald sorgt Regen für neuen Regen

25.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Rundum-Sorglos-Symbiont - Neuer Stoffwechselweg in Muschelsymbiose entdeckt

25.10.2016 | Medizin Gesundheit

Schwefelbrücken in Wasser spalten ist komplizierter als gedacht

25.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie