Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Astronomers Catch Jet from Binge-Eating Black Hole

13.12.2012
Back in January, a new X-ray source flared and rapidly brightened in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), located 2.5 million light-years away.

Classified as an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), the object is only the second ever seen in M31 and became the target of an intense observing campaign by orbiting X-ray telescopes -- including NASA's Swift -- and radio observatories on the ground. These efforts resulted in the first detection of radio-emitting jets from a stellar-mass black hole outside our own galaxy.


The ULX's radio-emitting jet (center) is unresolved in this image constructed from Very Long Baseline Array data. Each side of the image is 20 milliarcseconds across, or about the width of a human hair seen from a distance of half a mile. Credit: NRAO/M. Middleton et al.

A ULX is thought to be a binary system containing a black hole that is rapidly accreting gas from its stellar companion. However, to account for the brilliant high-energy output, gas must be flowing into the black hole at a rate very near a theoretical maximum, a feeding frenzy that astronomers do not yet fully understand.

"There are four black hole binaries within our own galaxy that have been observed accreting at these extreme rates," said Matthew Middleton, an astronomer at the Anton Pannekoek Astronomical Institute in Amsterdam. "Gas and dust in our own galaxy interfere with our ability to probe how matter flows into ULXs, so our best glimpse of these processes comes from sources located out of the plane of our galaxy, such as those in M31."

As gas spirals toward a black hole, it becomes compressed and heated, eventually reaching temperatures where it emits X-rays. As the rate of matter ingested by the black hole increases, so does the X-ray brightness of the gas. At some point, the X-ray emission becomes so intense that it pushes back on the inflowing gas, theoretically capping any further increase in the black hole's accretion rate. Astronomers refer to this as the Eddington limit, after Sir Arthur Eddington, the British astrophysicist who first recognized a similar cutoff to the maximum luminosity of a star.

"Black-hole binaries in our galaxy that show accretion at the Eddington limit also exhibit powerful radio-emitting jets that move near the speed of light," Middleton said. Although astronomers know little about the physical nature of these jets, detecting them at all would confirm that the ULX is accreting at the limit and identify it as a stellar mass black hole.

The European Space Agency's XMM-Newton observatory first detected the ULX, dubbed XMMU J004243.6+412519 after its astronomical coordinates, on Jan. 15. Middleton and a large international team then began monitoring it at X-ray energies using XMM-Newton and NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. The scientists conducted radio observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the continent-spanning Very Long Baseline Array, both operated by the National Science Foundation in Socorro, N.M., and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array located at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory near Cambridge, England.

In a paper published online by the journal Nature on Wednesday, Dec. 12, the scientists reveal their successful detection of intense radio emission associated with a jet moving at more than 85 percent the speed of light. VLA data reveal that the radio emission was quite variable, in one instance decreasing by a factor of two in just half an hour.

"This tells us that the region producing radio waves is extremely small in size -- no farther across than the distance between Jupiter and the sun," explained team member James Miller-Jones, a research fellow at the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research in Perth, Western Australia.

Black holes have been conclusively detected in two varieties: "lightweight" ones created by stars and containing up to a few dozen times the sun's mass, and supermassive "heavyweights" of millions to billions of solar masses found at the centers of most big galaxies. Astronomers have debated whether many ULXs represent hard-to-find "middleweight" versions, containing hundreds to thousands of solar masses.

"The discovery of jets tells us that this particular ULX is a typical stellar remnant about 10 times the mass of the sun, swallowing as much material as it possibly can," Middleton said. "We may well find jets in ULXs with similar X-ray properties in other nearby galaxies, which will help us better understand the nature of these incredible outflows."

Commenting on the findings on behalf of the Swift team, Stefan Immler at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., noted that it was almost exciting enough for astronomers to witness a new ULX so close to home, even if "close" is a few million light-years away. "But detecting the jets is a real triumph, one that will allow us to study the accretion process of these elusive black hole candidates in never-before-seen detail," he said.

Francis Reddy
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Francis Reddy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nasa.gov
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/andromeda-xray.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht A New Litmus Test for Chaos?
29.07.2015 | American Institute of Physics (AIP)

nachricht First detection of lithium from an exploding star
29.07.2015 | ESO

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Superschneller Wellenritt im Kristall: Elektronik auf Zeitskala einzelner Lichtschwingungen möglich

Physikern der Universitäten Regensburg und Marburg ist es gelungen, die von einem starken Lichtfeld getriebene Bewegung von Elektronen in einem Halbleiter in extremer Zeitlupe zu beobachten. Dabei konnten sie ein grundlegend neues Quantenphänomen entschlüsseln. Die Ergebnisse der Wissenschaftler sind jetzt in der renommierten Fachzeitschrift „Nature“ veröffentlicht worden (DOI: 10.1038/nature14652).

Die rasante Entwicklung in der Elektronik mit Taktraten bis in den Gigahertz-Bereich hat unser Alltagsleben revolutioniert. Sie stellt jedoch auch Forscher...

Im Focus: On the crest of the wave: Electronics on a time scale shorter than a cycle of light

Physicists from Regensburg and Marburg, Germany have succeeded in taking a slow-motion movie of speeding electrons in a solid driven by a strong light wave. In the process, they have unraveled a novel quantum phenomenon, which will be reported in the forthcoming edition of Nature.

The advent of ever faster electronics featuring clock rates up to the multiple-gigahertz range has revolutionized our day-to-day life. Researchers and...

Im Focus: Erster Nachweis von Lithium in einem explodierenden Stern

Erstmals konnte das chemische Element Lithium in der ausgestoßenen Materie einer Nova nachgewiesen werden. Beobachtungen von Nova Centauri 2013 mit Teleskopen des La Silla-Observatoriums der ESO und in der Nähe von Santiago de Chile helfen bei der Aufklärung des Rätsels, warum so viele junge Sterne mehr von diesem Element enthalten als erwartet. Diese Entdeckung liefert ein seit langem fehlendes Teil im Puzzle der chemischen Entwicklungsgeschichte unserer Galaxie und ist ein großer Fortschritt für das Verständnis des Mischungsverhältnisses der chemischen Elemente in den Sternen unserer Milchstraße.

Das leichte chemische Element Lithium ist eines der wenigen Elemente, das nach unserer Modellvorstellung auch beim Urknall vor 13,8 Milliarden Jahren...

Im Focus: Durch den Monsun: Flugzeugmission zu Auswirkungen auf Luftqualität und Klimawandel

Mit dem Flugzeug von Zypern auf die Malediven und zurück. Was nach einer Urlaubsreise klingt, ist für 65 Atmosphärenforscher aus ganz Deutschland anspruchsvolle Arbeit: Bei einer Forschungsmission mit dem Flugzeug HALO des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt untersuchen sie derzeit, ob und wie sich die Monsun-Regenfälle in Asien auf die Selbstreinigungskraft der Atmosphäre auswirken. Mit an Bord sind auch zwei Messgeräte des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie (KIT): Die Karlsruher Klimaforscher messen dabei unter anderem die Konzentrationen von Ozon und Aceton. Das Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie in Mainz koordiniert die Kampagne.

„Die Erdatmosphäre kann sich von Treibhausgasen oder Abgasen aus dem Verkehr selbst reinigen. Dabei wandeln Hydroxyl-Radikale – das sind besonders...

Im Focus: Lichtschalter auf DVD

Da sich die elektronischen Eigenschaften eines optischen Speichermaterials schneller ändern als seine Struktur, könnte es neue Anwendungen finden

In DVDs steckt möglicherweise mehr als bisher angenommen. Das Material aus Germanium, Antimon und Tellur, in dem die Datenträger Information speichern, könnte...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Tagung „Brandschutz im Tank- und Gefahrgutlager“ am 16. November 2015 im Essener Haus der Technik stellt praktische Lösungen vor

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

12. BMBF-Forum für Nachhaltigkeit: Green Economy, Energiewende und die Zukunft der Städte

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Elektropott: Ruhrgebiets-Hackathon soll Innovation, Kreativität und Teamgeist junger Talente fördern

29.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Effiziente Infrarot-Wärme spart Zeit und Energie bei der Herstellung von Autoteppichen

30.07.2015 | Messenachrichten

Deutsche Börse platziert Hybridanleihe im Volumen von EUR 600 Millionen

30.07.2015 | Wirtschaft Finanzen

Tagung „Brandschutz im Tank- und Gefahrgutlager“ am 16. November 2015 im Essener Haus der Technik stellt praktische Lösungen vor

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten