Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Stereoscopic mammography could reduce recall rate

13.11.2012
A new three-dimensional (3-D) digital mammography technique has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast cancer screening, according to a study published in Radiology.

Two-dimensional (2-D) x-ray mammography, the current primary screening method for early detection of breast cancer in women, is a valuable tool but has some limitations. Surrounding normal tissue can mask lesions, and 2-D views do not provide direct information about the volumetric appearance—meaning the three-dimensional physical shape—of a detected lesion.

A novel technique called stereoscopic digital mammography (SDM) addresses these limitations by mimicking the way that human eyes work together to form a 3-D image. The technique uses digital mammography equipment that's been modified to allow the X-ray tube to move separately from the cassette. The resulting images are viewed on two monitors mounted one above the other.

"Our eyes see the world from two slightly different perspectives," said Carl J. D'Orsi, M.D., from the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory University School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, both in Atlanta. "In this technique, the X-ray tube functions as the eyeball, with two different images providing slightly different views of the internal structure of the breast."

By using a unique workstation and polarizing lenses, SDM has the ability to identify lesions at different depths within the breast volume, potentially reducing both false positive findings and recalls while enabling more accurate diagnosis.

Dr. D'Orsi and colleagues recently compared SDM to 2-D digital mammography in 779 patients at elevated risk of developing breast cancer because of personal or family history. Patients received both exams in a single visit, and two experienced radiologists independently interpreted the final total of 1,298 exams. Imaging findings were correlated with results of one-year follow up or biopsy.

SDM significantly improved the accuracy of cancer detection. The specificity of 91.2 percent was better than the 87.8 percent rate for 2-D digital mammography; and the accuracy of 90.9 percent, compared with 87.4 percent for 2-D digital mammography, was also a statistically significant improvement.

"We found that the stereoscopic technique could significantly decrease the need for calling women back for additional exams," Dr. D'Orsi said.

Dr. D'Orsi and colleagues are expanding their research to study

SDM with a lower radiation dose in the general screening population. The radiation dose used in the study was approximately double the standard dose for mammography.

"In this study, we used a high-risk population to get an adequate number of cancers, and we acquired each of the images comprising the stereo pairs with a full standard X-ray dose," he said. "Now that we know the technique is worthwhile, we're repeating the study in the general population with a dose comparable to routine screening mammography."

"Stereoscopic Digital Mammography: Improved Specificity and Reduced Rate of Recall in a Prospective Clinical Trial." Collaborating with Dr. D'Orsi were David J. Getty, Ph.D., Ronald M. Pickett, Ph.D., Ioannis Sechopoulos, Ph.D., Mary S. Newell, M.D., Kathleen R. Gundry, M.D., Sandra R. Bates, M.D., Robert M. Nishikawa, Ph.D., Edward A. Sickles, M.D., Andrew Karellas, Ph.D., and Ellen M. D'Orsi, R.T. (R)(M).

Radiology is edited by Herbert Y. Kressel, M.D., Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., and owned and published by the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (http://radiology.rsna.org/)

RSNA is an association of more than 50,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists, promoting excellence in patient care and health care delivery through education, research and technologic innovation.

The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

For patient-friendly information on breast imaging, visit RadiologyInfo.org.

Linda Brooks | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rsna.org

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Self-learning software for better medical diagnoses
02.02.2016 | Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institut für Bildgestützte Medizin

nachricht New pen-sized microscope could ID cancer cells in doctor's offices and operating rooms
26.01.2016 | University of Washington

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Automatisiertes Fahren: Lenken ohne Grenzen

Projekt OmniSteer startet mit 3,4 Millionen Euro Budget, um urbane Manövrierfähigkeit von Autos zu steigern

Autos steigern die Mobilität ihrer Nutzer. In engen Innenstädten jedoch stoßen sie an die Grenzen der eigenen Manövrierfähigkeit. Etwa für Vielparker wie...

Im Focus: Automated driving: Steering without limits

OmniSteer project to increase automobiles’ urban maneuverability begins with a € 3.4 million budget

Automobiles increase the mobility of their users. However, their maneuverability is pushed to the limit by cramped inner city conditions. Those who need to...

Im Focus: Embedded World: Fraunhofer ESK zeigt Entwicklung eines ausfallsicheren Bordnetzes für die Autos der Zukunft

Hochautomatisiertes Fahren setzt voraus, dass Fahrzeuge Fehler selbstständig beheben können, bis der Fahrer in der Lage ist, selbst einzugreifen. Dazu muss im Bordnetz des Autos die Ausfallsicherheit kritischer Funktionen garantiert sein. Das Fraunhofer ESK zeigt auf der Embedded World in Nürnberg (23. bis 25. Februar), wie das mit Erweiterungen des aktuellen AUTOSAR-Standards umzusetzen ist. Hierfür stellen die ESK-Forscher auch eine Werkzeugkette vor, mit der solche Bordnetze entwickelt werden können (Halle 4 / Stand 460).

Fällt in einem hochautomatisierten Fahrzeug eine Steuerungseinheit aus, muss das Fahrzeug selbstständig reagieren, bis der Fahrer eingreifen und das Fahren...

Im Focus: Fusionsanlage Wendelstein 7-X erzeugt erstes Wasserstoff-Plasma

Bundeskanzlerin schaltet Plasma ein / Beginn des wissenschaftlichen Experimentierbetriebs

Am 3. Februar 2016 wurde in der Fusionsanlage Wendelstein 7-X im Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Greifswald das erste Wasserstoff-Plasma erzeugt....

Im Focus: Mikroskopie: Neun auf einen Streich

Fortschritt für die biomedizinische Bildgebung: Im Biozentrum der Uni Würzburg wurde die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie so weiterentwickelt, dass sich jetzt bis zu neun verschiedene Zellstrukturen gleichzeitig markieren und abbilden lassen.

Mit der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie können Forscher Biomoleküle in Zellen sichtbar machen. Sie markieren die Moleküle mit fluoreszierenden Sonden, regen diese mit...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

25 Jahre tropische Meeresforschung in Bremen: das Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenökologie

05.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Programmieren lernen leicht gemacht - GFOS lädt zum GFOS Java Summercamp

04.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Bochum Treff Bergmannsheil: 200 Chirurgen diskutierten aktuelle Therapien bei Protheseninfektionen

04.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Pharmapack: Neue Verpackungslösungen von SCHOTT

05.02.2016 | Messenachrichten

Diese Zellen sagen, wo’s lang geht

05.02.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

„LAVA“ kann Implantate verbessern

05.02.2016 | Materialwissenschaften