Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Rapid Detection of Malaria

21.11.2012
The Department of Microsystems Engineering of the University of Freiburg is Coordinating the Research Project DiscoGnosis

An estimated 220 million people become infected with malaria each year. The disease is often lethal – particularly in tropical developing countries with insufficient health care services.


source: IMTEK/Bernd Müller

The infected suffer from a high fever. As this is also the case with other germs, however, it is important to conduct a rapid and precise analysis to determine the cause of the disease for a successful therapy. A team of researchers aims to develop a rapid test of this kind within the context of the project DiscoGnosis.

Launched in November 2012, the project will receive three million euros in funding from the European Union and is being coordinated by the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the University of Freiburg.

DiscoGnosis stands for “disc-shaped point-of-care platform for infectious disease diagnosis” – a device that looks similar to a DVD player. Its purpose will be to purify patients’ blood samples and detect all relevant fever-causing germs in a single step. The institutions responsible for the project want to develop an inexpensive method for determining whether a person with fever has malaria or not. Studies have shown that 30 to 40 percent of patients being treated for malaria are actually suffering from typhus or dengue fever.

Each disc will be intended for one use only and will be capable of making a reliable diagnosis automatically with the help of integrated biochemical analytical processes. The innovation thus has the potential to bring modern diagnostics to countries and regions with poor infrastructure and improve the health care of entire populations. Ultimately, it could serve as a shield to stop the spread of malaria in Europe, which is currently being exacerbated by climate change.

IMTEK’s partners in the consortium are the University Medical Center Göttingen, the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, the Swiss tool technology and engineering company Rohrer AG, the biotechnology companies MagnaMedics Diagnostics BV from the Netherlands and MAST Group Ltd. from Great Britain, and the European Foundation for Clinical Nanomedicine.

Further Information:
www.pr.uni-freiburg.de/go/discognosis
Contact:
Dr. Konstantinos Mitsakakis
Project Coordinator
Department of Microsystems Engineering, Laboratory for MEMS Applications
University of Freiburg
Phone: +49 (0)761/203-73252
E-Mail: konstantinos.mitsakakis@imtek.uni-freiburg.de
Katrin Grötzinger
PR & Marketing
Department of Microsystems Engineering
University of Freiburg
Phone: +49 (0)761/203-73242
E-Mail: katrin.groetzinger@imtek.uni-freiburg.de

Melanie Hübner | University of Freiburg
Further information:
http://www.uni-freiburg.de
http://www.pr.uni-freiburg.de/go/discognosis

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Radar schützt vor Weltraummüll

Die Bedrohung im All durch Weltraummüll ist groß. Aktive Satelliten und Raumfahrzeuge können beschädigt oder zerstört werden. Ein neues, nationales Weltraumüberwachungssystem soll ab 2018 vor Gefahren im Orbit schützen. Fraunhofer-Forscher entwickeln das Radar im Auftrag des DLR Raumfahrtmanagement.

Die »Verkehrssituation« im All ist angespannt: Neben unzähligen Satelliten umkreisen Weltraumtrümmer wie beispielsweise ausgebrannte Raketenstufen und...

Im Focus: X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time

New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions

A new technique pioneered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real...

Im Focus: Neue Flugzeugflügel reparieren Risse von selbst

Prozess basiert auf Kohlefasern, die bei Schäden sofort aktiv werden

Forscher der University of Bristol http://bris.ac.uk haben Flugzeugflügel entwickelt, die sich im Falle eines Schadens selbst reparieren können. Als...

Im Focus: Aktuatoren – bewegt wie die Mittagsblume

Materialien nach dem Vorbild mancher Pflanzen könnten Robotern künftig zu natürlichen Bewegungen verhelfen

Wenn Ingenieure bewegliche Komponenten von Robotern entwickeln, können sie sich demnächst vielleicht der Kniffe von Pflanzen bedienen. Forscher des...

Im Focus: Iron: A biological element?

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and a half billion years ago.

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Dauerbrenner Zusatzstoffe in Lebensmitteln

01.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Interdisziplinäres Forschungscluster „Demografischer Wandel“ tagte zum ersten Mal

01.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

DBU lädt ein zu Forum über nachhaltige Landwirtschaft

01.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Dauerbrenner Zusatzstoffe in Lebensmitteln

01.07.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Neun neue Forschergruppen, eine neue Klinische Forschergruppe

01.07.2015 | Förderungen Preise

Offshore-Windkraftwerk Westermost Rough offiziell eingeweiht

01.07.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung