Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Study finds eating deep-fried food is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer

29.01.2013
Frequent, regular consumption has strongest effect and is linked to more aggressive disease

Regular consumption of deep-fried foods such as French fries, fried chicken and doughnuts is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, and the effect appears to be slightly stronger with regard to more aggressive forms of the disease, according to a study by investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Corresponding author Janet L. Stanford, Ph.D., and colleagues Marni Stott-Miller, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow and Marian Neuhouser, Ph.D., all of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division, have published their findings online in The Prostate.

While previous studies have suggested that eating foods made with high-heat cooking methods, such as grilled meats, may increase the risk of prostate cancer, this is the first study to examine the addition of deep frying to the equation.

From French fries to doughnuts: Eating more than once a week may raise risk

Specifically, Stanford, co-director of the Hutchinson Center’s Program in Prostate Cancer Research, and colleagues found that men who reported eating French fries, fried chicken, fried fish and/or doughnuts at least once a week were at an increased risk of prostate cancer as compared to men who said they ate such foods less than once a month.

In particular, men who ate one or more of these foods at least weekly had an increased risk of prostate cancer that ranged from 30 to 37 percent. Weekly consumption of these foods was associated also with a slightly greater risk of more aggressive prostate cancer. The researchers controlled for factors such as age, race, family history of prostate cancer, body-mass index and PSA screening history when calculating the association between eating deep-fried foods and prostate cancer risk.

“The link between prostate cancer and select deep-fried foods appeared to be limited to the highest level of consumption – defined in our study as more than once a week – which suggests that regular consumption of deep-fried foods confers particular risk for developing prostate cancer,” Stanford said.

Deep frying may trigger formation of carcinogens in food
Possible mechanisms behind the increased cancer risk, Stanford hypothesizes, include the fact that when oil is heated to temperatures suitable for deep frying, potentially carcinogenic compounds can form in the fried food. They include acrylamide (found in carbohydrate-rich foods such as French fries), heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (chemicals formed when meat is cooked at high temperatures), aldehyde (an organic compound found in perfume) and acrolein (a chemical found in herbicides). These toxic compounds are increased with re-use of oil and increased length of frying time.

Foods cooked with high heat also contain high levels of advanced glycation endproducts, or AGEs, which have been associated with chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Deep-fried foods are among the highest in AGE content. A chicken breast deep fried for 20 minutes contains more than nine times the amount of AGEs as a chicken breast boiled for an hour, for example.

For the study, Stanford and colleagues analyzed data from two prior population-based case-control studies involving a total of 1,549 men diagnosed with prostate cancer and 1,492 age-matched healthy controls. The men were Caucasian and African-American Seattle-area residents and ranged in age from 35 to 74 years. Participants were asked to fill out a dietary questionnaire about their usual food intake, including specific deep-fried foods.

The first study of its kind

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to look at the association between intake of deep-fried food and risk of prostate cancer,” Stanford said. However, deep-fried foods have previously been linked to cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, head and neck, and esophagus.

Because deep-fried foods are primarily eaten outside the home, it is possible that the link between these foods and prostate cancer risk may be a sign of high consumption of fast foods in general, the authors wrote, citing the dramatic increase in fast-food restaurants and fast-food consumption in the U.S. in the past several decades.
The project was supported by the National Cancer Institute and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Editor’s note: To obtain a copy of The Prostate paper, “Consumption of Deep-Fried Foods and Risk of Prostate Cancer,” visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pros.22643/full


At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. The Hutchinson Center’s pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer with minimal side effects. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, the Hutchinson Center houses the nation’s first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women’s Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network. Private contributions are essential for enabling Hutchinson Center scientists to explore novel research opportunities that lead to important medical breakthroughs. For more information visit www.fhcrc.org or follow the Hutchinson Center on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

MEDIA CONTACT
Kristen Woodward
206-667-5095
kwoodwar@fhcrc.org

Kristen Woodward | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fhcrc.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers improve efficiency of human walking
02.04.2015 | National Science Foundation

nachricht Trial at the UKE: Vaccine reliably activates the immune system response against Ebola
02.04.2015 | Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fliegende Tankstellen könnten den Luftverkehr revolutionieren

Langstreckenflugzeuge sollen künftig mit wenig Treibstoff starten und erst in 10 000 Metern Höhe vollgetankt werden. Auf diese Weise liesse sich rund 20 Prozent Kerosin einsparen. In einem europäischen Forschungsprojekt hat die ZHAW zusammen mit Partnerinstitutionen aus fünf Ländern ein solches Konzept für die Luftfahrt entwickelt.

In Sachen Energieeffizienz ist bei Flugzeugen noch viel Luft nach oben: Denn auch modernste Langstreckenflugzeuge wie der Airbus A380 oder die Boeing 787 sind...

Im Focus: Aktuelle Maßnahmen gegen Mikroplastik

Worst Case: Sonntagnachmittag, erste Radtour bei schönem Wetter. Ein Autofahrer rast vorbei und wirft seine PET-Getränkeflasche achtlos in den Graben. Das Material der Flasche wurde aus Rohöl hergestellt und wird einige hundert Jahre benötigen, bis es zersetzt ist. Vollständig abgebaut wird es nie, zurück bleiben winzige Teilchen ­ das sogenannte Mikroplastik. Fraunhofer UMSICHT begegnet den kleinen Kunststoffpartikeln in zwei aktuellen Maßnahmen.

Die »Initiative Mikroplastik« möchte durch die Initiierung von Forschungs- und Entwicklungs-Vorhaben die Mengen und Sorten an Mikroplastik in der Umwelt...

Im Focus: Smarte Fassaden mit Energiespareffekt

Gläserne Bürobauten gehören zu den großen Energiefressern. Sie müssen aufwändig klimatisiert werden. Ein von Fraunhofer-Forschern und Designern entwickeltes Fassadenelement für Glasfronten soll den Energieverbrauch senken. Dazu nutzt es die Wärmenergie der Sonne. Ein Demonstrator ist auf der Hannover Messe zu sehen.

Fast 40 Prozent beträgt der Anteil von Gebäuden am gesamten Energieverbrauch in Deutschland. Das Heizen, Kühlen und Lüften von Wohnhäusern, Büroimmobilien und...

Im Focus: Lizard activity levels can help scientists predict environmental change

Research study provides new tools to assess warming temperatures

Spring is here and ectotherms, or animals dependent on external sources to raise their body temperature, are becoming more active. Recent studies have shown...

Im Focus: Der Werkstoff macht’s: Nichtoxidkeramik eröffnet neue Perspektiven für den Chemie- und Anlagenbau

Herausragende chemische, thermische und tribologische Eigenschaften prädestinieren siliziuminfiltriertes Siliziumcarbid für die Produktion großvolumiger keramischer Bauteile.

Ein neuartiges Verfahren überwindet nun verfahrenstechnischen Grenzen konventioneller Formgebungsmethoden. Dadurch können  Komponenten mit großen...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Holzbau mit Bestand - Thema der Norddeutschen Holzbautagung 2015

01.04.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Training für LNG-Anwender aus dem maritimen und nichtmaritimen Bereich

01.04.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Wie lässt sich Nachhaltigkeit messen und bewerten?

01.04.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Asiatische Buschmücke auf dem Vormarsch - Modellierungen zeigen Gefahren-Hotspots in Deutschland

02.04.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Impfstoff gegen Ebola ist vielversprechend - Tropenmediziner stellen erste Studienergebnisse vor

02.04.2015 | Medizin Gesundheit

Ebola-Impfstudie im UKE: Impfstoff aktiviert Immunsystem zuverlässig gegen Ebola

02.04.2015 | Medizin Gesundheit