Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Study finds eating deep-fried food is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer

29.01.2013
Frequent, regular consumption has strongest effect and is linked to more aggressive disease

Regular consumption of deep-fried foods such as French fries, fried chicken and doughnuts is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, and the effect appears to be slightly stronger with regard to more aggressive forms of the disease, according to a study by investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Corresponding author Janet L. Stanford, Ph.D., and colleagues Marni Stott-Miller, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow and Marian Neuhouser, Ph.D., all of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division, have published their findings online in The Prostate.

While previous studies have suggested that eating foods made with high-heat cooking methods, such as grilled meats, may increase the risk of prostate cancer, this is the first study to examine the addition of deep frying to the equation.

From French fries to doughnuts: Eating more than once a week may raise risk

Specifically, Stanford, co-director of the Hutchinson Center’s Program in Prostate Cancer Research, and colleagues found that men who reported eating French fries, fried chicken, fried fish and/or doughnuts at least once a week were at an increased risk of prostate cancer as compared to men who said they ate such foods less than once a month.

In particular, men who ate one or more of these foods at least weekly had an increased risk of prostate cancer that ranged from 30 to 37 percent. Weekly consumption of these foods was associated also with a slightly greater risk of more aggressive prostate cancer. The researchers controlled for factors such as age, race, family history of prostate cancer, body-mass index and PSA screening history when calculating the association between eating deep-fried foods and prostate cancer risk.

“The link between prostate cancer and select deep-fried foods appeared to be limited to the highest level of consumption – defined in our study as more than once a week – which suggests that regular consumption of deep-fried foods confers particular risk for developing prostate cancer,” Stanford said.

Deep frying may trigger formation of carcinogens in food
Possible mechanisms behind the increased cancer risk, Stanford hypothesizes, include the fact that when oil is heated to temperatures suitable for deep frying, potentially carcinogenic compounds can form in the fried food. They include acrylamide (found in carbohydrate-rich foods such as French fries), heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (chemicals formed when meat is cooked at high temperatures), aldehyde (an organic compound found in perfume) and acrolein (a chemical found in herbicides). These toxic compounds are increased with re-use of oil and increased length of frying time.

Foods cooked with high heat also contain high levels of advanced glycation endproducts, or AGEs, which have been associated with chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Deep-fried foods are among the highest in AGE content. A chicken breast deep fried for 20 minutes contains more than nine times the amount of AGEs as a chicken breast boiled for an hour, for example.

For the study, Stanford and colleagues analyzed data from two prior population-based case-control studies involving a total of 1,549 men diagnosed with prostate cancer and 1,492 age-matched healthy controls. The men were Caucasian and African-American Seattle-area residents and ranged in age from 35 to 74 years. Participants were asked to fill out a dietary questionnaire about their usual food intake, including specific deep-fried foods.

The first study of its kind

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to look at the association between intake of deep-fried food and risk of prostate cancer,” Stanford said. However, deep-fried foods have previously been linked to cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, head and neck, and esophagus.

Because deep-fried foods are primarily eaten outside the home, it is possible that the link between these foods and prostate cancer risk may be a sign of high consumption of fast foods in general, the authors wrote, citing the dramatic increase in fast-food restaurants and fast-food consumption in the U.S. in the past several decades.
The project was supported by the National Cancer Institute and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Editor’s note: To obtain a copy of The Prostate paper, “Consumption of Deep-Fried Foods and Risk of Prostate Cancer,” visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pros.22643/full


At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. The Hutchinson Center’s pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer with minimal side effects. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, the Hutchinson Center houses the nation’s first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women’s Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network. Private contributions are essential for enabling Hutchinson Center scientists to explore novel research opportunities that lead to important medical breakthroughs. For more information visit www.fhcrc.org or follow the Hutchinson Center on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

MEDIA CONTACT
Kristen Woodward
206-667-5095
kwoodwar@fhcrc.org

Kristen Woodward | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fhcrc.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Correct connections are crucial
26.06.2017 | Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Vorbild Delfinhaut: Elastisches Material vermindert Reibungswiderstand bei Schiffen

Für eine elegante und ökonomische Fortbewegung im Wasser geben Delfine den Wissenschaftlern ein exzellentes Vorbild. Die flinken Säuger erzielen erstaunliche Schwimmleistungen, deren Ursachen einerseits in der Körperform und andererseits in den elastischen Eigenschaften ihrer Haut zu finden sind. Letzteres Phänomen ist bereits seit Mitte des vorigen Jahrhunderts bekannt, konnte aber bislang nicht erfolgreich auf technische Anwendungen übertragen werden. Experten des Fraunhofer IFAM und der HSVA GmbH haben nun gemeinsam mit zwei weiteren Forschungspartnern eine Oberflächenbeschichtung entwickelt, die ähnlich wie die Delfinhaut den Strömungswiderstand im Wasser messbar verringert.

Delfine haben eine glatte Haut mit einer darunter liegenden dicken, nachgiebigen Speckschicht. Diese speziellen Hauteigenschaften führen zu einer signifikanten...

Im Focus: Kaltes Wasser: Und es bewegt sich doch!

Bei minus 150 Grad Celsius flüssiges Wasser beobachten, das beherrschen Chemiker der Universität Innsbruck. Nun haben sie gemeinsam mit Forschern in Schweden und Deutschland experimentell nachgewiesen, dass zwei unterschiedliche Formen von Wasser existieren, die sich in Struktur und Dichte stark unterscheiden.

Die Wissenschaft sucht seit langem nach dem Grund, warum ausgerechnet Wasser das Molekül des Lebens ist. Mit ausgefeilten Techniken gelingt es Forschern am...

Im Focus: Hyperspektrale Bildgebung zur 100%-Inspektion von Oberflächen und Schichten

„Mehr sehen, als das Auge erlaubt“, das ist ein Anspruch, dem die Hyperspektrale Bildgebung (HSI) gerecht wird. Die neue Kameratechnologie ermöglicht, Licht nicht nur ortsaufgelöst, sondern simultan auch spektral aufgelöst aufzuzeichnen. Das bedeutet, dass zur Informationsgewinnung nicht nur herkömmlich drei spektrale Bänder (RGB), sondern bis zu eintausend genutzt werden.

Das Fraunhofer IWS Dresden entwickelt eine integrierte HSI-Lösung, die das Potenzial der HSI-Technologie in zuverlässige Hard- und Software überführt und für...

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Klima-Satellit: Mit robuster Lasertechnik Methan auf der Spur

Hitzewellen in der Arktis, längere Vegetationsperioden in Europa, schwere Überschwemmungen in Westafrika – mit Hilfe des deutsch-französischen Satelliten MERLIN wollen Wissenschaftler ab 2021 die Emissionen des Treibhausgases Methan auf der Erde erforschen. Möglich macht das ein neues robustes Lasersystem des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Lasertechnologie ILT in Aachen, das eine bisher unerreichte Messgenauigkeit erzielt.

Methan entsteht unter anderem bei Fäulnisprozessen. Es ist 25-mal wirksamer als das klimaschädliche Kohlendioxid, kommt in der Erdatmosphäre aber lange nicht...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Internationale Fachkonferenz IEEE ICDCM - Lokale Gleichstromnetze bereichern die Energieversorgung

27.06.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale Konferenz zu aktuellen Fragen der Stammzellforschung

27.06.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Fraunhofer FKIE ist Gastgeber für internationale Experten Digitaler Mensch-Modelle

27.06.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Mainzer Physiker gewinnen neue Erkenntnisse über Nanosysteme mit kugelförmigen Einschränkungen

27.06.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Wave Trophy 2017: Doppelsieg für die beiden Teams von Phoenix Contact

27.06.2017 | Unternehmensmeldung

Warnsystem KATWARN startet international vernetzten Betrieb

27.06.2017 | Informationstechnologie