Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Scientists Discover Mechanism That Could Reduce Obesity

06.12.2012
Approximately 68 percent of U.S. adults are overweight or obese, according to the National Cancer Institute, which puts them at greater risk for developing cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and a host of other chronic illnesses.
But an international team of scientists led by Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researcher Andrew Larner, M.D., Ph.D., has successfully reversed obesity in mice by manipulating the production of an enzyme known as tyrosine-protein kinase-2 (Tyk2). In their experiments, the scientists discovered that Tyk2 helps regulate obesity in mice and humans through the differentiation of a type of fat tissue known as brown adipose tissue (BAT).

Published today in the online edition of the journal Cell Metabolism, the study is the first to provide evidence of the relationship between Tyk2 and BAT. Previous studies by Larner and his team discovered that Tyk2 helps suppress the growth and metastasis of breast cancer, and now the current study suggests this same enzyme could help protect against and even reverse obesity.

The scientists were able to reverse obesity in mice that do not express Tyk2 by expressing a protein known as signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3). Stat3 mediates the expression of a variety of genes that regulate a host of cellular processes. The researchers found that Stat3 formed a complex with a protein known as PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16) to restore the development of BAT and decrease obesity.

“We discovered that Tyk2 levels in mice are regulated by diet. We then tested tissue samples from humans and found that levels of Tyk2 were more than 50 percent lower in obese humans,” said Larner, Martha Anne Hatcher Distinguished Professor in Oncology and co-leader of the Cancer Cell Signaling program at VCU Massey Cancer Center. “Our findings open new potential avenues for research and development of new pharmacological and nutritional treatments for obesity.”

There are two different types of fat – white adipose tissue (WAT) and BAT. WAT is the primary site of energy storage. BAT is responsible for energy expenditure in order to maintain body temperature. BAT deposits are present in all mammals, but until recently, scientists thought BAT was only active in infants and not in adult humans. Only in the last four years have scientists realized that BAT is present in adults and helps to regulate energy expenditure. Additionally, research has shown that diminished BAT activity is associated with metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Researchers estimate metabolic syndrome could affect as much as 25 percent of the U.S. population.

“We have made some very interesting observations in this study, but there are many questions left unanswered,” said Larner. “We plan to further investigate the actions of Tyk2 and Stat3 in order to better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of brown adipose tissue. We’re hopeful this research will help lead to new targets to treat a variety of obesity-related diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.”

Larner collaborated on this study with Marta Derecka, Magdalena Morgan, Vidisha Raje, Jennifer Sisler and Quifang Zhang, all from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at VCU School of Medicine; Tomasz Kordula, Ph.D., Cancer Cell Signaling program member at VCU Massey; Agnieszka Gornicka, from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Sergei B. Koralov, Ph.D., from New York University Medical School; Dennis Otero, Ph.D., from the University of California; Joanna Cichy, Ph.D., from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland; Klaus Rajewsky, Ph.D., from Harvard Medical School; Kazuya Shimoda, M.D., Ph.D., from Miyazaki University in Japan; Valeria Poli, Ph.D., from the University of Turin in Torino, Italy; Brigit Strobl, Ph.D., from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria; Sandra Pellegrini, Ph.D., from Institut Pasteur in Paris, France; Thurl E. Harris, Ph.D., and Susanna R. Keller, M.D., from University of Virginia School of Medicine; Patrick Seale, Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Aaron P. Russell, Ph.D., from Deakin University in Burwood, Australia; Andrew J. McAinch, Ph.D., from Victoria University in St. Albans, Australia; Paul E. O’Brien, M.D., from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia; and Colleen M. Croniger, Ph.D., from Case Western University School of Medicine.

This study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01 AI059710-01 and R21 AI088487, the Austrian Science Fund and, in part, by funding from VCU Massey Cancer Center's NIH-NCI Cancer Center Support Grant P30 CA016059.

News directors: Broadcast access to VCU Massey Cancer Center experts is available through VideoLink ReadyCam. ReadyCam transmits video and audio via fiber optics through a system that is routed to your newsroom. To schedule a live or taped interview, contact John Wallace, (804) 628-1550.
About the VCU Massey Cancer Center
VCU Massey Cancer Center is one of only 66 National Cancer Institute-designated institutions in the country that leads and shapes America’s cancer research efforts. Working with all kinds of cancers, the Center conducts basic, translational and clinical cancer research, provides state-of-the-art treatments and clinical trials, and promotes cancer prevention and education. Since 1974, Massey has served as an internationally recognized center of excellence. It offers a wide range of clinical trials throughout Virginia, oftentimes the most trials in the state, and serves patients in Richmond and in four satellite locations. Its 1,000 researchers, clinicians and staff members are dedicated to improving the quality of human life by developing and delivering effective means to prevent, control and ultimately to cure cancer. Visit Massey online at www.massey.vcu.edu or call 877-4-MASSEY for more information.
About VCU and the VCU Medical Center
Virginia Commonwealth University is a major, urban public research university with national and international rankings in sponsored research. Located in downtown Richmond, VCU enrolls more than 31,000 students in 222 degree and certificate programs in the arts, sciences and humanities. Sixty-six of the programs are unique in Virginia, many of them crossing the disciplines of VCU’s 13 schools and one college. MCV Hospitals and the health sciences schools of Virginia Commonwealth University compose the VCU Medical Center, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers.

John Wallace | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vcu.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Hochfeldmagnet am BER II: Einblick in eine versteckte Ordnung

Seit dreißig Jahren gibt eine bestimmte Uranverbindung der Forschung Rätsel auf. Obwohl die Kristallstruktur einfach ist, versteht niemand, was beim Abkühlen unter eine bestimmte Temperatur genau passiert. Offenbar entsteht eine so genannte „versteckte Ordnung“, deren Natur völlig unklar ist. Nun haben Physiker erstmals diese versteckte Ordnung näher charakterisiert und auf mikroskopischer Skala untersucht. Dazu nutzten sie den Hochfeldmagneten am HZB, der Neutronenexperimente unter extrem hohen magnetischen Feldern ermöglicht.

Kristalle aus den Elementen Uran, Ruthenium, Rhodium und Silizium haben eine geometrisch einfache Struktur und sollten keine Geheimnisse mehr bergen. Doch das...

Im Focus: Schmetterlingsflügel inspiriert Photovoltaik: Absorption lässt sich um bis zu 200 Prozent steigern

Sonnenlicht, das von Solarzellen reflektiert wird, geht als ungenutzte Energie verloren. Die Flügel des Schmetterlings „Gewöhnliche Rose“ (Pachliopta aristolochiae) zeichnen sich durch Nanostrukturen aus, kleinste Löcher, die Licht über ein breites Spektrum deutlich besser absorbieren als glatte Oberflächen. Forschern am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ist es nun gelungen, diese Nanostrukturen auf Solarzellen zu übertragen und deren Licht-Absorptionsrate so um bis zu 200 Prozent zu steigern. Ihre Ergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler nun im Fachmagazin Science Advances. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700232

„Der von uns untersuchte Schmetterling hat eine augenscheinliche Besonderheit: Er ist extrem dunkelschwarz. Das liegt daran, dass er für eine optimale...

Im Focus: Schnelle individualisierte Therapiewahl durch Sortierung von Biomolekülen und Zellen mit Licht

Im Blut zirkulierende Biomoleküle und Zellen sind Träger diagnostischer Information, deren Analyse hochwirksame, individuelle Therapien ermöglichen. Um diese Information zu erschließen, haben Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Lasertechnik ILT ein Mikrochip-basiertes Diagnosegerät entwickelt: Der »AnaLighter« analysiert und sortiert klinisch relevante Biomoleküle und Zellen in einer Blutprobe mit Licht. Dadurch können Frühdiagnosen beispielsweise von Tumor- sowie Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen gestellt und patientenindividuelle Therapien eingeleitet werden. Experten des Fraunhofer ILT stellen diese Technologie vom 13.–16. November auf der COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf vor.

Der »AnaLighter« ist ein kompaktes Diagnosegerät zum Sortieren von Zellen und Biomolekülen. Sein technologischer Kern basiert auf einem optisch schaltbaren...

Im Focus: Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt

Eine gemeinsame Studie der Universität Bern und des Inselspitals Bern zeigt, dass spezielle Bindegewebszellen, die in normalen Blutgefässen die Wände abdichten, bei Lungenkrebs nicht mehr richtig funktionieren. Zusätzlich unterdrücken sie die immunologische Bekämpfung des Tumors. Die Resultate legen nahe, dass diese Zellen ein neues Ziel für die Immuntherapie gegen Lungenkarzinome sein könnten.

Lungenkarzinome sind die häufigste Krebsform weltweit. Jährlich werden 1.8 Millionen Neudiagnosen gestellt; und 2016 starben 1.6 Millionen Menschen an der...

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Das Immunsystem in Extremsituationen

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die jungen forschungsstarken Unis Europas tagen in Ulm - YERUN Tagung in Ulm

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Bauphysiktagung der TU Kaiserslautern befasst sich mit energieeffizienten Gebäuden

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Forscher finden Hinweise auf verknotete Chromosomen im Erbgut

20.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Saugmaschinen machen Waschwässer von Binnenschiffen sauberer

20.10.2017 | Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz

Strukturbiologieforschung in Berlin: DFG bewilligt Mittel für neue Hochleistungsmikroskope

20.10.2017 | Förderungen Preise