Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Protein injection points to muscular dystrophy treatment

27.11.2012
Scientists have discovered that injecting a novel human protein into muscle affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy significantly increases its size and strength, findings that could lead to a therapy akin to the use of insulin by diabetics.

These results were published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Julia von Maltzahn and Dr. Michael Rudnicki, the Ottawa scientist who discovered muscle stem cells in adults.

"This is an unprecedented and dramatic restoration in muscle strength," says Dr. Rudnicki, a senior scientist and director for the Regenerative Medicine Program and Sprott Centre for Stem Cell Research at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. He is also a Canada Research Chair in Molecular Genetics and professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa.

"We know from our previous work that this protein, called Wnt7a, promotes the growth and repair of healthy muscle tissue. In this study we show the same types of improvement in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that Wnt7a injections increased muscle strength almost two-fold, to nearly normal levels. We also found that the size of the muscle fibre increased and there was less muscle damage, compared to mice not given Wnt7a."

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder that affects one of every 3,500 newborn males. In Canada, all types of muscular dystrophy affect more than 50,000 people. The disease often progresses to a state where the muscles are so depleted that the person dies due to an inability to breath. For people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, this usually happens in their 20s or 30s.

"This is also exciting because we think it's a therapeutic approach that could apply to other muscle-wasting diseases," says Dr. Rudnicki.

Dr. Rudnicki's lab is a world leader in research on muscle stem cells. They have contributed significantly to our understanding of how these cells work at the molecular level. This basic research, which takes place in OHRI's multidisciplinary environment of collaboration with clinicians, led to the identification of Wnt7a as a promising candidate to help people with this muscle wasting disease.

Biotechnology partner, Fate Therapeutics is currently developing Wnt7a-based therapeutic candidates for treatment of muscular dystrophy and atrophy. Preclinical assessments are ongoing and the company plans to initiate clinical trials in the near future.

The full article, "Wnt7a treatment ameliorates muscular dystrophy," is available online ahead of print through the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences site.

This research was supported by the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the National Institutes of Health, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fate Therapeutics and the Canada Research Chair Program. All research at OHRI is also supported by The Ottawa Hospital Foundation.

Media Contact
Paddy Moore
Manager, Communications and Public Relations,
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
613-798-5555 ext. 73687
613-794-6912 (cell)
padmoore@ohri.ca
Néomie Duval
Media Relations Officer
University of Ottawa
613-562-5800 x2981
613-863-7221 (cell)
neomie.duval@uOttawa.ca
About the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI)

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) is the research arm of The Ottawa Hospital and is an affiliated institute of the University of Ottawa, closely associated with the university's Faculties of Medicine and Health Sciences. OHRI includes more than 1,700 scientists, clinical investigators, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and staff conducting research to improve the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Research at OHRI is supported by The Ottawa Hospital Foundation. www.ohri.ca
About the University of Ottawa

The University of Ottawa is committed to research excellence and encourages an interdisciplinary approach to knowledge creation, which attracts the best academic talent from across Canada and around the world. It is an important stakeholder in the National Capital Region's economic development.

Paddy Moore | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ohri.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Indications of Psychosis Appear in Cortical Folding
26.04.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cells
20.04.2018 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Why we need erasable MRI scans

New technology could allow an MRI contrast agent to 'blink off,' helping doctors diagnose disease

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE und teamtechnik bringen leitfähiges Kleben für Siliciumsolarzellen zu Industriereife

Das Kleben der Zellverbinder von Hocheffizienz-Solarzellen im industriellen Maßstab ist laut dem Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE und dem Anlagenhersteller teamtechnik marktreif. Als Ergebnis des gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekts »KleVer« ist die Klebetechnologie inzwischen so weit ausgereift, dass sie als alternative Verschaltungstechnologie zum weit verbreiteten Weichlöten angewendet werden kann. Durch die im Vergleich zum Löten wesentlich niedrigeren Prozesstemperaturen können vor allem temperatursensitive Hocheffizienzzellen schonend und materialsparend verschaltet werden.

Dabei ist der Durchsatz in der industriellen Produktion nur geringfügig niedriger als beim Verlöten der Zellen. Die Zuverlässigkeit der Klebeverbindung wurde...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: Innovatives 3D-Druckverfahren für die Raumfahrt

Auf der Hannover Messe 2018 präsentiert die Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), wie Astronauten in Zukunft Werkzeug oder Ersatzteile per 3D-Druck in der Schwerelosigkeit selbst herstellen können. So können Gewicht und damit auch Transportkosten für Weltraummissionen deutlich reduziert werden. Besucherinnen und Besucher können das innovative additive Fertigungsverfahren auf der Messe live erleben.

Pulverbasierte additive Fertigung unter Schwerelosigkeit heißt das Projekt, bei dem ein Bauteil durch Aufbringen von Pulverschichten und selektivem...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: IWS-Ingenieure formen moderne Alu-Bauteile für zukünftige Flugzeuge

Mit Unterdruck zum Leichtbau-Flugzeug

Ingenieure des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS) in Dresden haben in Kooperation mit Industriepartnern ein innovatives Verfahren...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Konferenz »Encoding Cultures. Leben mit intelligenten Maschinen« | 27. & 28.04.2018 ZKM | Karlsruhe

26.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Konferenz zur Marktentwicklung von Gigabitnetzen in Deutschland

26.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

infernum-Tag 2018: Digitalisierung und Nachhaltigkeit

24.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Weltrekord an der Uni Paderborn: Optische Datenübertragung mit 128 Gigabits pro Sekunde

26.04.2018 | Informationstechnologie

Multifunktionaler Mikroschwimmer transportiert Fracht und zerstört sich selbst

26.04.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Berner Mars-Kamera liefert erste farbige Bilder vom Mars

26.04.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics