Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New Methodology to Predict Pandemics

15.02.2013
Current Research Uses Smart Surveillance to Rapidly Identify Emerging Disease Threats

EcoHealth Alliance, the nonprofit organization that focuses on local conservation and global health issues, announced new research focused on the rapid identification of disease outbreaks in the peer reviewed publication, Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

The article, authored by leading scientists in the fields of emerging disease ecology, biomathematics, computational biology and bioinformatics, shows how network theory can be used to identify outbreaks of unidentified diseases. The strategy builds on the wealth of online surveillance data and increased reporting and tracking of emerging infectious diseases via the Internet.

Pandemics often first emerge in remote regions, and early in their development, the identity of the cause is often unknown. In many cases these events turn out to be known diseases that don't require emergency action, and cutting through the clutter and uncertainty to determine which outbreaks are important is a critical challenge.

The newly released research used a simple set of data collected at the earliest stages of an outbreak such as symptoms, time of year, and percentage of the population that died (the case fatality rate). This information was collected from 125 reports of outbreaks on 10 known infectious diseases causing encephalitis (brain or neural infection) in South Asia - a known 'hotspot' for new disease outbreaks.
The data was analyzed to examine whether outbreaks of the same disease clustered together, based on basic outbreak properties (symptoms, timing and case fatality rate). Results showed that diseases such as Nipah virus - an emerging and very lethal disease - showed distinct characteristic patterns within such a network and clustered separately to other more established diseases such as malaria and Japanese encephalitis. The team was then able to take outbreaks caused by unknown pathogens and provide a probable diagnosis for these 'mystery diseases'. The initial analysis shows a promising advantage to aid in predicting and preventing possible pandemic diseases that can result in devastating losses in life and global economic crises. "This application of network theory is exciting not only because it provides a fast, affordable method for associating undiagnosed outbreaks with a set of most likely known diseases, but perhaps most importantly because it provides a method for researchers to work with public health experts to identify potentially novel pathogen threats, as these agents will not fall into any of the known disease clusters and therefore can be easily identified," said Dr. Tiffany Bogich, Princeton University.

Often, new pandemics start as a few cases of an unknown disease in a remote region of the globe. After a few weeks or months depending on conditions, the disease continues to spread through the rapid movement of global travelers. As with the SARS outbreak, the virus incubated for a few months in China before it spread to Hong Kong, Canada and other points around the world. In 2009, the outbreak of H1N1 'Swine' flu circulated in Mexico for at least a couple of months before it was discovered as a real threat to public health. When Nipah virus caused outbreaks in pigs and farm workers in Malaysia, many health officials thought the disease was symptomatic of Japanese encephalitis. All of these examples illustrate the need to identify highly infectious diseases at the very earliest stage - when there are just a few cases - allowing public health officials to thwart these new viruses from spreading globally.

"This research may be critical to rapidly deciding which outbreaks are something completely novel and have pandemic potential, rather than a repeat outbreak of a known pathogen. It allows public health agencies to target their resources in the most efficient way, and helps protect us from new emerging diseases, which often erupt in remote corners of the Earth where it is sometimes very difficult to obtain vital information, let alone biological samples to test for various pathogens," said Dr. Peter Daszak, corresponding author and President of EcoHealth Alliance. "Another aspect that we are looking at is using this tool to pinpoint possible bio-terrorism, such an act will produce immediate symptoms that are unusual, and would likely light up on our network analysis," added Dr. Daszak.

This study was funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT, National Institutes of Health/National Science Foundation RAPID 'Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases' from the John E. Fogarty International Center, DTRA, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the New York Community Trust.

About EcoHealth Alliance
Building on over 40 years of groundbreaking science, EcoHealth Alliance is a global, nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting wildlife and safeguarding human health from the emergence of disease. The organization develops ways to combat the effects of damaged ecosystems on human and wildlife health. Using environmental and health data covering the past 60 years, EcoHealth Alliance scientists created the first-ever, global disease hotspots map that identified at-risk regions, to help predict and prevent the next pandemic crisis. That work is the foundation of EcoHealth Alliance's rigorous, science-based approach, focused at the intersection of the environment, health, and capacity building. Working in the U.S. and more than 20 countries worldwide, EcoHealth Alliance's strength is founded on innovations in research, training, global partnerships, and policy initiatives. For more information, please visit www.ecohealthalliance.org.

Anthony M. Ramos | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ecohealthalliance.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kühler Zwerg und die sieben Planeten

Erdgroße Planeten mit gemäßigtem Klima in System mit ungewöhnlich vielen Planeten entdeckt

In einer Entfernung von nur 40 Lichtjahren haben Astronomen ein System aus sieben erdgroßen Planeten entdeckt. Alle Planeten wurden unter Verwendung von boden-...

Im Focus: Mehr Sicherheit für Flugzeuge

Zwei Entwicklungen am Lehrgebiet Rechnerarchitektur der FernUniversität in Hagen können das Fliegen sicherer machen: ein Flugassistenzsystem, das bei einem totalen Triebwerksausfall zum Einsatz kommt, um den Piloten ein sicheres Gleiten zu einem Notlandeplatz zu ermöglichen, und ein Assistenzsystem für Segelflieger, das ihnen das Erreichen größerer Höhen erleichtert. Präsentiert werden sie von Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Schiffmann auf der Internationalen Fachmesse für Allgemeine Luftfahrt AERO vom 5. bis 8. April in Friedrichshafen.

Zwei Entwicklungen am Lehrgebiet Rechnerarchitektur der FernUniversität in Hagen können das Fliegen sicherer machen: ein Flugassistenzsystem, das bei einem...

Im Focus: HIGH-TOOL unterstützt Verkehrsplanung in Europa

Forschung am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) unterstützt die Europäische Kommission bei der Verkehrsplanung: Anhand des neuen Modells HIGH-TOOL lässt sich bewerten, wie verkehrspolitische Maßnahmen langfristig auf Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft und Umwelt wirken. HIGH-TOOL ist ein frei zugängliches Modell mit Modulen für Demografie, Wirtschaft und Ressourcen, Fahrzeugbestand, Nachfrage im Personen- und Güterverkehr sowie Umwelt und Sicherheit. An dem nun erfolgreich abgeschlossenen EU-Projekt unter der Koordination des KIT waren acht Partner aus fünf Ländern beteiligt.

Forschung am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) unterstützt die Europäische Kommission bei der Verkehrsplanung: Anhand des neuen Modells HIGH-TOOL lässt...

Im Focus: Zinn in der Photodiode: nächster Schritt zur optischen On-Chip-Datenübertragung

Schon lange suchen Wissenschaftler nach einer geeigneten Lösung, um optische Komponenten auf einem Computerchip zu integrieren. Doch Silizium und Germanium allein – die stoffliche Basis der Chip-Produktion – sind als Lichtquelle kaum geeignet. Jülicher Physiker haben nun gemeinsam mit internationalen Partnern eine Diode vorgestellt, die neben Silizium und Germanium zusätzlich Zinn enthält, um die optischen Eigenschaften zu verbessern. Das Besondere daran: Da alle Elemente der vierten Hauptgruppe angehören, sind sie mit der bestehenden Silizium-Technologie voll kompatibel.

Schon lange suchen Wissenschaftler nach einer geeigneten Lösung, um optische Komponenten auf einem Computerchip zu integrieren. Doch Silizium und Germanium...

Im Focus: Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig von diesen teuren Medikamenten profitieren, wird intensiv an deren Verbesserung gearbeitet. Forschern um Prof. Thomas Valerius an der Christian Albrechts Universität Kiel gelang es nun, innovative Antikörper mit verbesserter Wirkung zu entwickeln.

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Big Data Centrum Ostbayern-Südböhmen startet Veranstaltungsreihe

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2017

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Wie werden wir gesund alt? - Alternsforscher tagen auf interdisziplinärem Symposium in Magdeburg

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Preise 2017: DFG und BMBF zeichnen vier Forscherinnen und sechs Forscher aus

23.02.2017 | Förderungen Preise

Big Data Centrum Ostbayern-Südböhmen startet Veranstaltungsreihe

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Planeten außerhalb unseres Sonnensystems: Bayreuther Forscher dringen tief ins Weltall vor

23.02.2017 | Physik Astronomie