Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Do Three Meals a Day Keep Fungi Away?

19.10.2009
The fact that they eat a lot – and often – may explain why most people and other mammals are protected from the majority of fungal pathogens, according to research from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

The research, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, showed that the elevated body temperature of mammals – the familiar 98.6° F or 37° C in people – is too high for the vast majority of potential fungal invaders to survive.

“Fungal strains undergo a major loss of ability to grow as we move to mammalian temperatures,” said Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., chair and professor of microbiology & immunology at Einstein. Dr. Casadevall conducted the study in conjunction with Vincent A. Robert of the Utrecht, Netherlands-based Fungal Biodiversity Center, also known as Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures.

“Our study makes the argument that our warm temperatures may have evolved to protect us against fungal diseases,” said Dr. Casadevall. “And being warm-blooded and therefore largely resistant to fungal infections may help explain the dominance of mammals after the age of dinosaurs.”

There are roughly 1.5 million fungal species. Of these, only a few hundred are pathogenic to mammals. Fungal infections in people are often the result of an impaired immune function. By contrast, an estimated 270,000 fungal species are pathogenic to plants and 50,000 species infect insects. Frogs and other amphibians are prone to fungal pathogens, one of which, chytridiomycosis, is currently raging through frogs worldwide. Fungi are also important in the decomposition of plants.

In their study, the researchers investigated how 4,082 different fungal strains from the Utrecht collection grew in temperatures ranging from chilly – 4° C or 39° F – to desert hot – 45° C or 113° F. They found that nearly all of them grew well in temperatures up to 30° C. Beyond that, though, the number of successful species declined by 6 percent for every one degree centigrade increase. Most could not grow at mammalian temperatures. Those that did well in hotter conditions were often from warm-blooded sources.

Dr. Casadevall noted that the current study covered thousands of fungal strains and made use of a computerized database of the Utrecht collection. In the past, this type of research would have required retrieving this information manually, which Dr. Casadevall noted would have been a very time-consuming task.

“This was possible only because we could use bioinformatic tools to analyze the records in the culture collection,” he said. “There is no way to do a study like this without such technology given the enormous numbers of samples and the labor involved.”

The results of the study, he added, could help explain why mammals maintain a seemingly energy-wasteful lifestyle requiring a great deal of food. By contrast, reptiles need only eat once a day or even less often.

“The payoff, however, may be that mammals are much more resistant to soil and plant-borne fungal pathogens than are reptiles and other cold-blooded vertebrates,” said Dr. Casadevall.

This stronger immunity to fungi could explain why mammals rose to dominance after the dinosaur extinction event 65 million years ago. Indeed, the fungal bloom that occurred then may be one reason for the extinction of dinosaurs, a possibility outlined in a 2004 Fungal Genetics and Biology paper from Dr. Casadevall. (http://www.einstein.yu.edu/home/newsArchive.asp?id=63)

The research paper, “Vertebrate Endothermy Restricts Most Fungi as Potential Pathogens,” appeared in the October 13 online edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

About Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is one of the nation’s premier centers for research, medical education and clinical investigation. It is home to 2,775 faculty members, 625 M.D. students, 225 Ph.D. students, 125 students in the combined M.D./Ph.D. program, and 380 postdoctoral research fellows. In 2008, Einstein received more than $130 million in support from the NIH. This includes the funding of major research centers at Einstein in diabetes, cancer, liver disease, and AIDS. Other areas where the College of Medicine is concentrating its efforts include developmental brain research, neuroscience, cardiac disease, and initiatives to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities. Through its extensive affiliation network involving eight hospitals and medical centers in the Bronx, Manhattan and Long Island – which includes Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Einstein – the College of Medicine runs one of the largest post-graduate medical training programs in the United States, offering approximately 150 residency programs to more than 2,500 physicians in training.

Deirdre Branley | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.einstein.yu.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht An experimental Alzheimer's drug reverses genetic changes thought to spur the disease
04.05.2016 | Rockefeller University

nachricht Research points to a new treatment for pancreatic cancer
04.05.2016 | Purdue University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Sei mit STARS4ALL dabei, wenn Merkur vor die Sonne wandert

2012 war es die Venus, in diesem Jahr ist der Planet Merkur dran, vor der Sonne zu passieren. Für fast acht Stunden werden wir am 9. Mai 2016 die Möglichkeit haben, den Planeten Merkur als kleinen schwarzen Punkt auf der Oberfläche der Sonne durchziehen zu sehen. Das EU-Projekt STARS4ALL, an dem auch das IGB beteiligt ist, wird in Zusammenarbeit mit www.sky-live.tv das Phänomen von Teneriffa und von Island aus live übertragen. STARS4ALL bietet dazu Bildungsmaterial für Schüler an.

Am 9. Mai 2016, um die Mittagszeit, wird der Planet Merkur anfangen, die Scheibe der Sonne zu kreuzen; eine Reise, welche über sieben Stunden dauern wird.

Im Focus: MICROSCOPE sendet

Am Montag, 2. Mai 2016, erreichte die Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler vom Zentrum für angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation (ZARM) der Universität Bremen die erste Erfolgsmeldung von ihrem Forschungs-Satelliten. Per Videoübertragung waren sie zugeschaltet, als die französischen Kollegen das Experiment an Bord von MICROSCOPE (MICRO Satellite à traînée Compensée pour l'Observation du Principe d'Equivalence) initialisierten und das Messinstrument die ersten Testdaten übermittelte. Damit ist der wichtigste Meilenstein der Testphase erreicht, bevor sich herausstellt, ob Einsteins Relativitätstheorie auch nach dieser Satellitenmission noch Bestand haben wird.

“#TSAGE @onera_fr is on. The test masses have been released and servo looped!!!! Great all green“ lautet die Twitter-Nachricht der französischen Partner, die...

Im Focus: Genauester Spiegel der Welt bei European XFEL in Hamburg eingetroffen

Der vermutlich präziseste Spiegel der Welt ist bei European XFEL in der Metropolregion Hamburg eingetroffen. Der 95 Zentimeter lange Spiegel ist ein wichtiges Bauteil des Röntgenlasers, der 2017 in Betrieb gehen soll. Auf den ersten Blick sieht er einem normalen Spiegel durchaus ähnlich, ist jedoch extrem flach und glatt. Die größten Unebenheiten auf seiner Oberfläche haben eine Dimension von gerade einmal einem Nanometer, einem milliardstel Meter. Diese Präzision entspräche einer 40 Kilometer langen Straße, deren maximale Unebenheit gerade einmal so groß ist wie der Durchmesser eines Haars.

Der Röntgenspiegel ist der erste von mehreren, die an unterschiedlichen Stellen der Anlage zum Spiegeln und Filtern des Röntgenlaserstrahls eingebaut werden....

Im Focus: Erste Filmaufnahmen von Kernporen

Mithilfe eines extrem schnellen und präzisen Rasterkraftmikroskops haben Forscher der Universität Basel erstmals «lebendige» Kernporenkomplexe bei der Arbeit gefilmt. Kernporen sind molekulare Maschinen, die den Verkehr in und aus dem Zellkern kontrollieren. In ihrem kürzlich in «Nature Nanotechnology» publizierten Artikel erklären die Forscher, wie bewegliche «Tentakeln» in der Pore die Passage von unerwünschten Molekülen verhindern.

Das Rasterkraftmikroskop (AFM) ist kein Mikroskop zum Durchschauen. Es tastet wie ein Blinder mit seinen Fingern die Oberflächen mit einer extrem feinen Spitze...

Im Focus: Nuclear Pores Captured on Film

Using an ultra fast-scanning atomic force microscope, a team of researchers from the University of Basel has filmed “living” nuclear pore complexes at work for the first time. Nuclear pores are molecular machines that control the traffic entering or exiting the cell nucleus. In their article published in Nature Nanotechnology, the researchers explain how the passage of unwanted molecules is prevented by rapidly moving molecular “tentacles” inside the pore.

Using high-speed AFM, Roderick Lim, Argovia Professor at the Biozentrum and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute of the University of Basel, has not only directly...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Diabetes Kongress in Berlin beginnt heute

04.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

UFW-Fachtagung im Vorzeichen von Big Data und Industrie 4.0

03.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

analytica conference 2016 in München - Foodomics, mehr als nur ein Modebegriff?

03.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Beim Laden von Lithium-Luft-Akkus entsteht hochreaktiver Singulett-Sauerstoff

04.05.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Sei mit STARS4ALL dabei, wenn Merkur vor die Sonne wandert

04.05.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Mehr als eine mechanische Barriere - Epithelzellen kämpfen aktiv gegen das Grippevirus

04.05.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie