Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

IBS and bloating: When the gut microbiota gets out of balance

10.03.2014

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) belongs to the most widespread diseases in Western countries, causing up to sixty per cent of the workload of gastrointestinal physicians.

One of the most frequent symptoms of IBS is bloating, which reduces quality of life considerably as patients perceive it as particularly bothersome. For quite a long time, IBS was believed to be a primarily psychological condition.

"Contrary to this view, recent findings suggest that IBS is linked to clearly detectable gut microbiota alterations. Additionally, bloating can be related to specific kinds of diet, thus opening up promising paths towards an efficient disease management," says Professor Giovanni Barbara (University of Bologna, Italy).

This was one of the topics presented at the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Miami, FL, USA. On March 8-9, 2014, internationally leading experts discussed the latest advances in gut microbiota research and its impact on health.

... mehr zu:
»AGA »Exchange »Health »IBS »function »healthy »pain

IBS is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, causing several symptoms, which include abdominal pain, bowel movements that cause discomfort, and — in nearly all patients — bloating. IBS affects up to 20 percent of the population in Western countries. This condition represents up to 10 percent of the workload of family physicians and up to 60 per cent of that of gastroenterology practitioners. Within the range of IBS troubles, it is bloating that bothers patients most.

A microbiota-based condition

For quite a long time, not only bloating, but IBS in general was frequently perceived as a mainly psychological condition, mostly affecting young, predominantly female and anxious patients with no detectable abnormalities in their bowels. Consequently, the disease burden was often attributed to an imaginary disorder, and the treatment was far from satisfactory.

"Thanks to new diagnostic insights and a rapidly growing knowledge about the role and function of the microbial communities living inside our guts, our view on IBS and its causes has changed considerably," says Prof. Barbara, President of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility (ESNM). According to him, there is a lot of evidence showing that IBS is associated with an imbalanced composition of the gut microbiota. This means that the system of checks and balances between beneficial and potentially harmful bacteria, which characterizes a healthy gut microbiota, is disturbed in IBS patients.

"Probably the best example of this interaction is the discovery that IBS symptoms develop in up to 10 percent of previously healthy subjects after a single episode of gastroenteritis caused by an infection through bacterial pathogens like Salmonella, Shighella or Campylobacter, which can severely disrupt the microbiota balance," says Prof. Barbara. An additional problem results from the fact that not only infections, but also the antibiotics that are used as a remedy, may increase the risk for IBS, as they, too, can alter the gut microbiota in a negative way.

Nutrition is key

Another important factor is nutrition. Food that is rich in carbohydrates, particularly fiber, tends to produce larger amounts of gas than a diet without these ingredients. In some individuals, this might lead to repeated bloating and flatulence. The potentially negative impact of this kind of nutrition applies in particular to individuals who already suffer from IBS. Recent studies show that such a "flatulogenic" diet (for example, bread, cereals and pastries made of whole wheat, and beans, soy beans, corn, peas, Brussels' sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, celery, onions, leek, garlic, artichokes, figs, peaches, grapes and prunes) induces profound changes in the microbiota of IBS patients, thus prolonging and increasing the symptoms. However, at the same time, the gut microbiota of healthy subjects remained stable and unaffected by this kind of diet.1

"On the other hand, we now know for sure that diets containing low fiber content improve these symptoms significantly. Recent research results suggest that, compared to a normal Western diet, a diet low in so-called FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) reduces symptoms of IBS, including bloating, pain and passage of wind," says Prof. Barbara.

Another interesting observation Prof. Barbara points to is that those IBS patients who have several clear-cut gut symptoms have also more profound changes in their gut microbiota, as compared to other patients whose bowel physiology is less disturbed, but instead combined with mood disorders. This suggests that the troubles of the second group are more socially grounded and mood-related, whereas the condition of the patients belonging to the first group is predominantly physiologically based — IBS proper, so to speak.

What further developments can doctors and patients expect? "It is amazing to see how quickly gut microbiota research has gained center stage within gastroenterology in the course of the past few years," says Prof. Barbara. "This is due to its crucial role not only for IBS, but for gastrointestinal health in general. In order to further improve diagnosis and treatment, we have to identify more of the various functions of the intestinal bacteria. With regard to clinical applications, bacterial functions are even more important than their types."

###

The microbial communities that reside in the human gut and their impact on human health and disease are one of the most exciting new areas of research today. To address the most recent advances in this rapidly developing field, scientists and health-care professionals from all over the world came together at the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Miami, Florida, USA, on March 8-9, 2014. The meeting was hosted by the Gut Microbiota & Health Section of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility (ESNM) and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute, with the support of Danone.

1 Manichanh C, Eck A, Varela E, Roca J, Clemente JC, Gonzalez A, et al. Anal gas evacuation and colonic microbiota in patients with flatulence: effect of diet. Gut. 2013 Jun 13. PubMed PMID: 23766444. Epub 2013/06/15. Eng.

About the Gut Microbiota For Health Experts Exchange website

The http://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com Experts Exchange, provided by the Gut Microbiota & Health Section of ESNM, is an online platform for health-care professionals, scientists, and other people interested in the field. Thanks to being an open, independent and participatory medium, this digital service enables a scientific debate in the field of gut microbiota.

Connected to http://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com, the Twitter account @GMFHx, animated by experts, for experts from the medical and scientific community, actively contributes to the online exchanges about the gut microbiota. Follow @GMFHx on Twitter. You can follow the Twitter coverage of the event using #GMFH2014

About the Gut Microbiota & Health Section of ESNM

ESNM stands for the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, a member of United European Gastroenterology (UEG). The mission of the ESNM is to defend the interests of all professionals in Europe involved in the study of neurobiology and pathophysiology of gastrointestinal function. The Gut Microbiota & Health Section was set up to increase recognition of the links between the gut microbiota and human health, to spread knowledge and to raise interest in the subject. The Gut Microbiota & Health Section is open to professionals, researchers, and practitioners from all fields related to gut microbiota and health. http://www.esnm.eu/gut_health/gut_micro_health.php?navId=68

About the AGA

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programmes of the organisation. http://www.gastro.org

About Danone and Gut Microbiota for Health

Danone's conviction is that food plays an essential role in human health namely through the impact that the gut microbiota may have on health. That is why Danone supports the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit and Experts Exchange web platform with the aim to encourage research and increase knowledge in this promising area, in line with its mission to "bring health through food to as many people as possible". http://www.danone.com

Aimee Frank | EurekAlert!

Weitere Berichte zu: AGA Exchange Health IBS function healthy pain

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Aktuelle Therapiepfade und Studienübersicht zur CLL
20.10.2017 | Kompetenznetz Maligne Lymphome e.V.

nachricht Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt
18.10.2017 | Universität Bern

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Hochfeldmagnet am BER II: Einblick in eine versteckte Ordnung

Seit dreißig Jahren gibt eine bestimmte Uranverbindung der Forschung Rätsel auf. Obwohl die Kristallstruktur einfach ist, versteht niemand, was beim Abkühlen unter eine bestimmte Temperatur genau passiert. Offenbar entsteht eine so genannte „versteckte Ordnung“, deren Natur völlig unklar ist. Nun haben Physiker erstmals diese versteckte Ordnung näher charakterisiert und auf mikroskopischer Skala untersucht. Dazu nutzten sie den Hochfeldmagneten am HZB, der Neutronenexperimente unter extrem hohen magnetischen Feldern ermöglicht.

Kristalle aus den Elementen Uran, Ruthenium, Rhodium und Silizium haben eine geometrisch einfache Struktur und sollten keine Geheimnisse mehr bergen. Doch das...

Im Focus: Schmetterlingsflügel inspiriert Photovoltaik: Absorption lässt sich um bis zu 200 Prozent steigern

Sonnenlicht, das von Solarzellen reflektiert wird, geht als ungenutzte Energie verloren. Die Flügel des Schmetterlings „Gewöhnliche Rose“ (Pachliopta aristolochiae) zeichnen sich durch Nanostrukturen aus, kleinste Löcher, die Licht über ein breites Spektrum deutlich besser absorbieren als glatte Oberflächen. Forschern am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ist es nun gelungen, diese Nanostrukturen auf Solarzellen zu übertragen und deren Licht-Absorptionsrate so um bis zu 200 Prozent zu steigern. Ihre Ergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler nun im Fachmagazin Science Advances. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700232

„Der von uns untersuchte Schmetterling hat eine augenscheinliche Besonderheit: Er ist extrem dunkelschwarz. Das liegt daran, dass er für eine optimale...

Im Focus: Schnelle individualisierte Therapiewahl durch Sortierung von Biomolekülen und Zellen mit Licht

Im Blut zirkulierende Biomoleküle und Zellen sind Träger diagnostischer Information, deren Analyse hochwirksame, individuelle Therapien ermöglichen. Um diese Information zu erschließen, haben Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Lasertechnik ILT ein Mikrochip-basiertes Diagnosegerät entwickelt: Der »AnaLighter« analysiert und sortiert klinisch relevante Biomoleküle und Zellen in einer Blutprobe mit Licht. Dadurch können Frühdiagnosen beispielsweise von Tumor- sowie Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen gestellt und patientenindividuelle Therapien eingeleitet werden. Experten des Fraunhofer ILT stellen diese Technologie vom 13.–16. November auf der COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf vor.

Der »AnaLighter« ist ein kompaktes Diagnosegerät zum Sortieren von Zellen und Biomolekülen. Sein technologischer Kern basiert auf einem optisch schaltbaren...

Im Focus: Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt

Eine gemeinsame Studie der Universität Bern und des Inselspitals Bern zeigt, dass spezielle Bindegewebszellen, die in normalen Blutgefässen die Wände abdichten, bei Lungenkrebs nicht mehr richtig funktionieren. Zusätzlich unterdrücken sie die immunologische Bekämpfung des Tumors. Die Resultate legen nahe, dass diese Zellen ein neues Ziel für die Immuntherapie gegen Lungenkarzinome sein könnten.

Lungenkarzinome sind die häufigste Krebsform weltweit. Jährlich werden 1.8 Millionen Neudiagnosen gestellt; und 2016 starben 1.6 Millionen Menschen an der...

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Das Immunsystem in Extremsituationen

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die jungen forschungsstarken Unis Europas tagen in Ulm - YERUN Tagung in Ulm

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Bauphysiktagung der TU Kaiserslautern befasst sich mit energieeffizienten Gebäuden

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Forscher finden Hinweise auf verknotete Chromosomen im Erbgut

20.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Saugmaschinen machen Waschwässer von Binnenschiffen sauberer

20.10.2017 | Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz

Strukturbiologieforschung in Berlin: DFG bewilligt Mittel für neue Hochleistungsmikroskope

20.10.2017 | Förderungen Preise