Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

High altitude climbers at risk for brain bleeds

28.11.2012
New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research shows that mountain climbers who experience a certain type of high altitude sickness have traces of bleeding in the brain years after the initial incident, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a severe and often fatal condition that can affect mountain climbers, hikers, skiers and travelers at high altitudes—typically above 7,000 feet, or 2,300 meters.

HACE results from swelling of brain tissue due to leakage of fluids from the capillaries. Symptoms include headache, loss of coordination and decreasing levels of consciousness.

"HACE is a life-threatening condition," said Michael Knauth, M.D., Ph.D., from the University Medical Center's Department of Neuroradiology in Goettingen, Germany. "It usually happens in a hostile environment where neither help nor proper diagnostic tools are available."

Dr. Knauth and colleagues at the University Hospitals in Goettingen and Heidelberg, Germany, compared brain MRI findings among four groups of mountaineers: climbers with well documented episodes of HACE; climbers with a history of high altitude illness; climbers with a history of severe acute mountain sickness (AMS); and climbers with a history of isolated high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a life-threatening accumulation of fluid in the lungs that occurs at high altitudes. Two neuroradiologists assessed the brain MRI findings without knowing the status of the mountaineers and assigned a score based on the number and location of any microhemorrhages.

"In most cases, these microhemorrhages are so small that they are only visible with a special MRI technique called susceptibility-weighted imaging," Dr. Knauth said. "With this technique, the microhemorrhages are depicted as little black spots."

The MRI results showed brain microhemorrhages almost exclusively in HACE survivors. Of the 10 climbers with a history of HACE, eight had evidence of microhemorrhages on MRI. The other two had uncertain results. Only two of the remaining 26 climbers were positive for microhemorrhages.

"It was previously thought that HACE did not leave any traces in the brains of survivors," Dr. Knauth said. "Our studies show that this is not the case. For several years after, microhemorrhages or microbleeds are visible in the brains of HACE survivors."

Survivors of the most clinically severe cases of HACE had the most prominent evidence of microhemorrhages on MRI. The bleeds were found predominantly in the corpus callosum, the thick band of nerve fibers that connects the right and left halves of the brain, and showed a characteristic distribution different from other vascular diseases like vasculitis, or blood vessel inflammation.

"The distribution of microhemorrhages is a new and sensitive MRI sign of HACE and can be detected years after HACE," Dr. Knauth said. "We will further analyze our clinical and MRI data on patients with acute mountain sickness, which is thought to be a precursor of HACE."

In the meantime, Dr. Knauth does not think HACE survivors need to give up climbing.

"We cannot give such a strong recommendation," he said. "However, mountaineers who have already experienced HACE once should acclimatize to the altitude very slowly."

Coauthors are Kai Kallenberg, M.D., Peter Bartsch, M.D., and Kai Schommer, M.D.

Note: Copies of RSNA 2012 news releases and electronic images will be available online at RSNA.org/press12 beginning Monday, Nov. 26.

RSNA is an association of more than 50,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists, promoting excellence in patient care and health care delivery through education, research and technologic innovation. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill.

Editor's note: The data in these releases may differ from those in the published abstract and those actually presented at the meeting, as researchers continue to update their data right up until the meeting. To ensure you are using the most up-to-date information, please call the RSNA Newsroom at 1-312-949-3233.

For patient-friendly information on MRI of the brain, visit RadiologyInfo.org.

Linda Brooks | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rsna.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
11.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Topologische Isolatoren: Neuer Phasenübergang entdeckt

Physiker des HZB haben an BESSY II Materialien untersucht, die zu den topologischen Isolatoren gehören. Dabei entdeckten sie einen neuen Phasenübergang zwischen zwei unterschiedlichen topologischen Phasen. Eine dieser Phasen ist ferroelektrisch: das bedeutet, dass sich im Material spontan eine elektrische Polarisation ausbildet, die sich durch ein äußeres elektrisches Feld umschalten lässt. Dieses Ergebnis könnte neue Anwendungen wie das Schalten zwischen unterschiedlichen Leitfähigkeiten ermöglichen.

Topologische Isolatoren zeichnen sich dadurch aus, dass sie an ihren Oberflächen Strom sehr gut leiten, während sie im Innern Isolatoren sind. Zu dieser neuen...

Im Focus: Smarte Sensoren für effiziente Prozesse

Materialfehler im Endprodukt können in vielen Industriebereichen zu frühzeitigem Versagen führen und den sicheren Gebrauch der Erzeugnisse massiv beeinträchtigen. Eine Schlüsselrolle im Rahmen der Qualitätssicherung kommt daher intelligenten, zerstörungsfreien Sensorsystemen zu, die es erlauben, Bauteile schnell und kostengünstig zu prüfen, ohne das Material selbst zu beschädigen oder die Oberfläche zu verändern. Experten des Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken präsentieren vom 7. bis 10. November 2017 auf der Blechexpo in Stuttgart zwei Exponate, die eine schnelle, zuverlässige und automatisierte Materialcharakterisierung und Fehlerbestimmung ermöglichen (Halle 5, Stand 5306).

Bei Verwendung zeitaufwändiger zerstörender Prüfverfahren zieht die Qualitätsprüfung durch die Beschädigung oder Zerstörung der Produkte enorme Kosten nach...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - Dezember 2017

17.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Intelligente Messmethoden für die Bauwerkssicherheit: Fachtagung „Messen im Bauwesen“ am 14.11.2017

17.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Meeresbiologe Mark E. Hay zu Gast bei den "Noblen Gesprächen" am Beutenberg Campus in Jena

16.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

17.10.2017 | Informationstechnologie

Pflanzen gegen Staunässe schützen

17.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Den Trends der Umweltbranche auf der Spur

17.10.2017 | Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz