Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Got food allergies? Thanks to UCLA, you can test your meal on the spot using a cell phone

13.12.2012
Are you allergic to peanuts and worried there might be some in that cookie? Now you can find out using a rather unlikely source: your cell phone.

A team of researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed a lightweight device called the iTube, which attaches to a common cell phone to detect allergens in food samples. The iTube attachment uses the cell phone's built-in camera, along with an accompanying smart-phone application that runs a test with the same high level of sensitivity a laboratory would.


Left: The iTube platform, which utilizes colorimetric assays and a smart phone-based digital reader. Right: A screen capture of the iTube App.

Food allergies are an emerging public concern, affecting as many as 8 percent of young children and 2 percent of adults. Allergic reactions can be severe and even life-threatening. And while consumer-protection laws regulate the labeling of ingredients in pre-packaged foods, cross-contaminations can still occur during processing, manufacturing and transportation.

Although several products that detect allergens in foods are currently available, they are complex and require bulky equipment, making them ill-suited for use in public settings, according to the UCLA researchers.
The iTube was developed to address these issues, said Aydogan Ozcan, leader of the research team and a UCLA associate professor of electrical engineering and bioengineering. Weighing less than two ounces, the attachment analyzes a test tube–based allergen-concentration test known as a colorimetric assay.

To test for allergens, food samples are initially ground up and mixed in a test tube with hot water and an extraction solvent; this mixture is allowed to set for several minutes. Then, following a step-by-step procedure, the prepared sample is mixed with a series of other reactive testing liquids. The entire preparation takes roughly 20 minutes. When the sample is ready, it is measured optically for allergen concentration through the iTube platform, using the cell phone's camera and a smart application running on the phone.

The kit digitally converts raw images from the cell-phone camera into concentration measurements detected in the food samples. And beyond just a "yes" or "no" answer as to whether allergens are present, the test can also quantify how much of an allergen is in a sample, in parts per million.

The iTube platform can test for a variety of allergens, including peanuts, almonds, eggs, gluten and hazelnuts, Ozcan said.

The UCLA team successfully tested the iTube using commercially available cookies, analyzing the samples to determine if they had any harmful amount of peanuts, a potential allergen. Their research was recently published online in the peer-reviewed journal Lab on a Chip and will be featured in a forthcoming print issue of the journal.

Other authors of the research included graduate student and lead author Ahmet F. Coskun and undergraduate students Justin Wong, Delaram Khodadadi, Richie Nagi and Andrew Tey, all of whom are members of the Ozcan BioPhotonics Laboratory at UCLA. Ozcan is also a member of the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA.

"We envision that this cell phone–based allergen testing platform could be very valuable, especially for parents, as well as for schools, restaurants and other public settings," Ozcan said. "Once successfully deployed in these settings, the big amount of data — as a function of both location and time — that this platform will continuously generate would indeed be priceless for consumers, food manufacturers, policymakers and researchers, among others."

Allergen-testing results of various food products, tagged with a time and location stamp, can be uploaded directly from cell phones to iTube servers to create a personalized testing archive, which could provide additional resources for allergic individuals around the world. A statistical allergy database, coupled with geographic information, could be useful for future food-related policies — for example in restaurants, food production and for consumer protection, the researchers said.

The Ozcan BioPhotonics Lab is funded by the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Army Research Office Young Investigator Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award and the National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award.

For more information on the Ozcan BioPhotonics Research Group, visit http://innovate.ee.ucla.edu and http://biogames.ee.ucla.edu.

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, established in 1945, offers 28 academic and professional degree programs and has an enrollment of more than 5,000 students. The school's distinguished faculty are leading research to address many of the critical challenges of the 21st century, including renewable energy, clean water, health care, wireless sensing and networking, and cybersecurity. Ranked among the top 10 engineering schools at public universities nationwide, the school is home to nine multimillion-dollar interdisciplinary research centers in wireless sensor systems, wireless health, nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, renewable energy, customized computing, the smart grid, and the Internet, all funded by federal and private agencies and individual donors.

(www.engineer.ucla.edu | www.twitter.com/uclaengineering)

Matthew Chin | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucla.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticle versus cancer
21.07.2016 | Lomonosov Moscow State University

nachricht Titanium + gold = new gold standard for artificial joints
21.07.2016 | Rice University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forschen in 15 Kilometern Höhe - Einsatz des Flugzeuges HALO wird weiter gefördert

Das moderne Höhen-Forschungsflugzeug HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) wird auch in Zukunft für Projekte zur Atmosphären- und Erdsystemforschung eingesetzt werden können: Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) bewilligte jetzt Fördergelder von mehr als 11 Millionen Euro für die nächste Phase des HALO Schwerpunktprogramms (SPP 1294) in den kommenden drei Jahren. Die Universität Leipzig ist neben der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der Technischen Universität Dresden federführend bei diesem DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm.

Die Universität Leipzig wird von der Fördersumme knapp 6 Millionen Euro zur Durchführung von zwei Forschungsprojekten mit HALO sowie zur Deckung der hohen...

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Rekord in der Hochdruckforschung: 1 Terapascal erstmals erreicht und überschritten

Einem internationalen Forschungsteam um Prof. Dr. Natalia Dubrovinskaia und Prof. Dr. Leonid Dubrovinsky von der Universität Bayreuth ist es erstmals gelungen, im Labor einen Druck von 1 Terapascal (= 1.000.000.000.000 Pascal) zu erzeugen. Dieser Druck ist dreimal höher als der Druck, der im Zentrum der Erde herrscht. Die in 'Science Advances' veröffentlichte Studie eröffnet neue Forschungsmöglichkeiten für die Physik und Chemie der Festkörper, die Materialwissenschaft, die Geophysik und die Astrophysik.

Extreme Drücke und Temperaturen, die im Labor mit hoher Präzision erzeugt und kontrolliert werden, sind ideale Voraussetzungen für die Physik, Chemie und...

Im Focus: Graphen von der Rolle: Serienfertigung von Elektronik aus 2D-Nanomaterialien

Graphen, Kohlenstoff in zweidimensionaler Struktur, wird seit seiner Entdeckung im Jahr 2004 als ein möglicher Werkstoff der Zukunft gehandelt: Sein geringes Gewicht, die extreme Festigkeit, vor allem aber seine hohe thermische und elektrische Leitfähigkeit wecken Hoffnungen, Graphen bald für vollkommen neue Geräte und Technologien einsetzen zu können. Einen ersten Schritt gehen jetzt die Forscher im EU-Forschungsprojekt »HEA2D«: Ziel ist es, das 2D-Nanomaterial von einer Kupferfolie durch ein Rolle-zu-Rolle-Verfahren auf Kunststofffolien und -bauteile zu übertragen. Auf diese Weise soll eine Serienfertigung elektronischer und opto-elektronischer Komponenten auf Graphenbasis möglich werden.

Besonders interessiert an hochleistungsfähiger Elektronik aus 2D-Materialien ist die Automobilindustrie, die diese in Schaltern mit transparenten Leiterbahnen,...

Im Focus: Menschen können einzelnes Photon sehen

Forscher am Wiener Institut für Molekulare Pathologie (IMP) und an der Rockefeller University in New York wiesen erstmals nach, dass Menschen ein einzelnes Photon wahrnehmen können. Für ihre Experimente verwendeten sie eine Quanten-Lichtquelle und kombinierten sie mit einem ausgeklügelten psycho-physikalischen Ansatz. Das Wissenschaftsjournal “Nature Communications” veröffentlicht die Ergebnisse in seiner aktuellen Ausgabe.

Trotz zahreicher Studien, die seit über siebig Jahren zu diesem Thema durchgeführt wurden, konnte die absolute Untergrenze der menschlichen Sehfähigkeit bisher...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Das neue Präventionsgesetz aktiv gestalten

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Kamera für unsichtbare Felder

22.07.2016 | Physik Astronomie

3-D-Analyse von Materialien: Saarbrücker Forscher erhält renommierten US-Preis für sein Lebenswerk

22.07.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Signale der Hirnflüssigkeit steuern das Verhalten von Stammzellen im Gehirn

22.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie