Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New cell type developed for possible treatment of Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases

08.11.2012
UCI discovery accelerates efforts at Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center
UC Irvine researchers have created a new stem cell-derived cell type with unique promise for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Edwin Monuki of UCI’s Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, developmental & cell biology graduate student Momoko Watanabe and colleagues developed these cells — called choroid plexus epithelial cells — from existing mouse and human embryonic stem cell lines.

CPECs are critical for proper functioning of the choroid plexus, the tissue in the brain that produces cerebrospinal fluid. Among their various roles, CPECs make CSF and remove metabolic waste and foreign substances from the fluid and brain.

In neurodegenerative diseases, the choroid plexus and CPECs age prematurely, resulting in reduced CSF formation and decreased ability to flush out such debris as the plaque-forming proteins that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s. Transplant studies have provided proof of concept for CPEC-based therapies. However, such therapies have been hindered by the inability to expand or generate CPECs in culture.

“Our method is promising, because for the first time we can use stem cells to create large amounts of these epithelial cells, which could be utilized in different ways to treat neurodegenerative diseases,” said Monuki, an associate professor of pathology & laboratory medicine and developmental & cell biology at UCI.

The study appears in today’s issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

To create the new cells, Monuki and his colleagues coaxed embryonic stem cells to differentiate into immature neural stem cells. They then developed the immature cells into CPECs capable of being delivered to a patient’s choroid plexus.

These cells could be part of neurodegenerative disease treatments in at least three ways, Monuki said. First, they’re able to increase the production of CSF to help flush out plaque-causing proteins from brain tissue and limit disease progression. Second, CPEC “superpumps” could be designed to transport high levels of therapeutic compounds to the CSF, brain and spinal cord. Third, these cells can be used to screen and optimize drugs that improve choroid plexus function.

Monuki said the next steps are to develop an effective drug screening system and to conduct proof-of-concept studies to see how these CPECs affect the brain in mouse models of Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s and pediatric diseases.

Young-Jin Kang, Sanket Meghpara, Kimbley Lau, Chi-Yeh Chung and Jaymin Kathiriya of UCI and Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis of the Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York contributed to the study, which received support from the National Institutes of Health (grant NS064587), the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, UCI’s Institute for Clinical & Translational Science and UCI’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Led by Chancellor Michael Drake since 2005, UCI is among the most dynamic campuses in the University of California system, with nearly 28,000 undergraduate and graduate students, 1,100 faculty and 9,000 staff. Orange County’s second-largest employer, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $4 billion. For more UCI news, visit www.today.uci.edu.

News Radio: UCI maintains on campus an ISDN line for conducting interviews with its faculty and experts. Use of this line is available for a fee to radio news programs/stations that wish to interview UCI faculty and experts. Use of the ISDN line is subject to availability and approval by the university.

Media Contact
Tom Vasich
University Communications
949-824-6455
tmvasich@uci.edu

Tom Vasich | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uci.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Using DNA origami to build nanodevices of the future
31.08.2015 | Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University

nachricht An ounce of prevention: Research advances on 'scourge' of transplant wards
28.08.2015 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Elektrofahrzeuge kabellos laden und entladen

Über ein kabelloses Ladesystem können Elektroautos künftig nicht nur tanken, sondern die Energie ins Stromnetz zurückspeisen. Auf diese Weise helfen sie das Netz zu stabilisieren. Das kostengünstige Ladesystem erreicht hohe Wirkungsgrade – über den vollen Leistungsbereich von 400 Watt bis 3,6 Kilowatt. Die Abstände zwischen Auto und Ladespule können bis zu 20 Zentimeter be- tragen. Auf der Internationalen Automobil Ausstellung IAA in Frankfurt stellen Fraunhofer-Forscher den Prototyp vom 15. bis 18. September 2015 vor (Halle 4, Stand D33).

Es regnet in Strömen. Wer jetzt ein dickes unhandliches Kabel zwischen Elektrofahrzeug und Ladesäule einstecken muss, wird patschnass. Doch es nützt nichts,...

Im Focus: Increasingly severe disturbances weaken world's temperate forests

Longer, more severe, and hotter droughts and a myriad of other threats, including diseases and more extensive and severe wildfires, are threatening to transform some of the world's temperate forests, a new study published in Science has found. Without informed management, some forests could convert to shrublands or grasslands within the coming decades.

"While we have been trying to manage for resilience of 20th century conditions, we realize now that we must prepare for transformations and attempt to ease...

Im Focus: Meeresinseln als Heimat einmaliger Pflanzenarten

Warum leben in manchen Ökosystemen auffallend viele, in anderen Ökosystemen nur wenige Pflanzenarten? Wie kommt es, dass einige Arten jeweils nur in einer bestimmten, klar abgrenzbaren Region der Erde zuhause sind? Mit diesen Fragen hat sich Dr. Manuel Steinbauer in einer Reihe wissenschaftlicher Studien an der Universität Bayreuth befasst. Für seine Forschungsarbeiten wird der Bayreuther Ökologe, der zurzeit als Postdoc an der dänischen Universität Aarhus forscht, mit dem diesjährigen Wilhelm Pfeffer-Preis der Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft (DBG) ausgezeichnet. Der Preis ist mit 2.500 Euro dotiert.

Wenn es darum geht, den Gründen für die Verbreitung pflanzlicher Arten auf die Spur zu kommen und theoretische Erklärungsansätze zu überprüfen, sind...

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

Im Focus: Optische Schalter - Lernen mit Licht

Einem deutsch-französischen Team ist es gelungen, einen lichtempfindlichen Schalter für Nervenzellen zu entwickeln. Dies ermöglicht neue Einblicke in die Funktionsweise von Gedächtnis und Lernen, aber auch in die Entstehung von Krankheiten.

Lernen ist nur möglich, weil die Verknüpfungen zwischen den Nervenzellen im Gehirn fortwährend umgebaut werden: Je häufiger bestimmte Reizübertragungswege...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Frankfurter Hochhausfassadentage 2015: Frankfurt UAS veranstaltet Symposium und Hochhausführung

31.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Erreger unter Superlupen – Aufbruch in unsichtbare Welten

31.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Fehlermeldungen des Gehirns auf der Spur

31.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Fehlgeleitete Galileo-Satelliten für Forschungsmission freigegeben

31.08.2015 | Geowissenschaften

Frankfurter Hochhausfassadentage 2015: Frankfurt UAS veranstaltet Symposium und Hochhausführung

31.08.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Siemens-Lösungen unterstützen Diagnose und Therapie kardiovaskulärer Erkrankungen

31.08.2015 | Messenachrichten