Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Building healthy bones takes guts

15.02.2013
In what could be an early step toward new treatments for people with osteoporosis, scientists at Michigan State University report that a natural probiotic supplement can help male mice produce healthier bones.
Interestingly, the same can’t be said for female mice, the researchers report in the Journal of Cellular Physiology.

“We know that inflammation in the gut can cause bone loss, though it’s unclear exactly why,” said lead author Laura McCabe, a professor in MSU’s departments of Physiology and Radiology. “The neat thing we found is that a probiotic can enhance bone density.”

Probiotics are microorganisms that can help balance the immune system. For the study, the researchers fed the mice Lactobacillus reuteri, a probiotic known to reduce inflammation, a sometimes harmful effect of the body’s immune response to infection.

“Through food fermentation, we’ve been eating bacteria that we classify as probiotics for thousands of years,” said co-author Robert Britton, associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. “There’s evidence that this bacterium as a species has co-evolved with humans. It’s indigenous to our intestinal tracts and is something that, if missing, might cause problems.”

In the study, the male mice showed a significant increase in bone density after four weeks of treatment. There was no such effect when the researchers repeated the experiment with female mice, an anomaly they’re now investigating.

By 2020, half of all Americans over 50 are expected to have low bone density or osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. About one in two women and one in four men over 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis.

Drugs to prevent bone loss in osteoporosis patients are already in wide use, but over the long term they can disrupt the natural remodeling of bone tissue and could potentially have negative side effects that include unusual bone fractures and joint and muscle pain.

McCabe and Britton are quick to point out that this line of research is in its early stages and that results in mice don’t always translate to humans. But they’re hopeful the new study could point the way toward osteoporosis drugs that aren’t saddled with such side effects, especially for people who lose bone density from an early age because of another chronic condition.

“People tend to think of osteoporosis as just affecting postmenopausal women, but what they don’t realize is that it can occur with other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and Type 1 diabetes,” she said. “You don’t want to put your child on medications that reduce bone remodeling for the rest of their life, so something natural could be useful for long-term treatment of bone loss that begins at childhood.”

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and MSU. Research assistants Regina Irwin and Laura Schaefer co-authored the paper.

Andy McGlashen | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.msu.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Punctuating messages encoded in human genome with transposable elements
04.08.2015 | Aelan Cell Technologies

nachricht Real-time imaging of lung lesions during surgery helps localize tumors and improve precision
30.07.2015 | American Association for Thoracic Surgery

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kleine Löcher, große Wirkung: Aktives Elastomerlager reduziert Schwingungen

Wo große Bewegungen ausgeglichen werden müssen, sind Elastomere in ihrem Element. Sie federn passiv Stöße bei Fahrzeugen ab und reduzieren Schwingungen in Maschinen. Aber sie können noch mehr als das, wie Forscher des Fraunhofer LBF zeigen konnten. Sie haben diese elastischen Komponenten smarter gemacht und ihnen beigebracht, sich aktiv zu verformen. Dazu nutzt das Institut dielektrische Elastomere (DE). Das sind weiche Materialien, die sich unter hohen elektrischen Spannungen verformen, und das prädestiniert sie für den Aufbau von Aktoren. Gegenüber Piezoaktoren haben sie den Vorteil, vergleichsweise große Dehnungen bei geringeren Kräften zu erreichen.

Diese Fähigkeit haben die Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlässigkeit LBF genutzt und ein Konzept für DE-Aktoren...

Im Focus: Greenhouse gases' millennia-long ocean legacy

Continuing current carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean. These...

Im Focus: Kosten sparen beim Bau von Flugzeugturbinen

Verdichterscheiben für Flugzeugturbinen werden aus einem Materialstück herausgefräst. Bei der Bearbeitung fangen die Schaufeln an zu schwingen. Ein neuartiges Spannsystem steigert die Dämpfung der Schaufeln nun auf mehr als das 400-fache. Es lassen sich bis zu 5000 Euro Kosten bei der Fertigung einsparen.

Mal eben schnell in den Urlaub jetten oder für ein langes Wochenende nach Rom, Paris oder Madrid fliegen? Der Flugverkehr steigt, insbesondere der...

Im Focus: Gletscher verlieren mehr Eis als je zuvor

Der Gletscherschwund im ersten Jahrzehnt des 21. Jahrhunderts erreicht einen historischen Rekordwert seit Messbeginn. Das Schmelzen der Gletscher ist ein globales Phänomen und selbst ohne weiteren Klimawandel werden sie zusätzlich an Eis verlieren. Dies belegt die neueste Studie des World Glacier Monitoring Services unter der Leitung der Universität Zürich.

Seit über 120 Jahren sammelt der World Glacier Monitoring Service, mit heutigem Sitz an der Universität Zürich, weltweite Daten zu Gletscherveränderungen....

Im Focus: Glaciers melt faster than ever

Glacier decline in the first decade of the 21st century has reached a historical record, since the onset of direct observations. Glacier melt is a global phenomenon and will continue even without further climate change. This is shown in the latest study by the World Glacier Monitoring Service under the lead of the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

The World Glacier Monitoring Service, domiciled at the University of Zurich, has compiled worldwide data on glacier changes for more than 120 years. Together...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Managementkonferenz

04.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Tagung "Intelligente Beschichtungen für Außenanwendungen" in Dresden

03.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

MS Wissenschaft in Stuttgart: Fraunhofer zeigt Chancen im Ländle auf

03.08.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Siemens modernisiert Großteil des belgischen Eisenbahnnetzes

04.08.2015 | Verkehr Logistik

Wegweisende Konzepte rund ums Automatisierte Fahren und innovative Fahrzeuge gesucht

04.08.2015 | Verkehr Logistik

Mit Hightech und Honigtöpfen gegen Hacker

04.08.2015 | Informationstechnologie