Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

BPA shown to disrupt thyroid function in pregnant animals and offspring

14.11.2012
New study uses animal model similar to humans and shows BPA can affect thyroid function

In utero exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) can be associated with decreased thyroid function in newborn sheep, according to a recent study accepted for publication in Endocrinology, a journal of The Endocrine Society. Hypothyroidism is characterized by poor mental and physical performance in human adults and in children can result in cognitive impairment and failure to grow normally.

BPA, a major molecule used in the plastic industry, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor that could exert deleterious effects on human health. Most investigations have focused on reproductive functions, but there is evidence that BPA might have negative effects on other endocrine systems including thyroid function. The current study used sheep, a relevant model for human pregnancy and thyroid regulation and ontogeny, and analyzed the internal exposures of the fetuses and their mothers to BPA and determined to what extent those exposures may be associated with thyroid disruption.

"Our study is the first to show that BPA can alter thyroid function of pregnant animals and their offspring in a long-gestation species with similar regulation of thyroid function as humans," said Catherine Viguié, PhD, of Toxalim, Research Centre in Food Toxicology in Toulouse, France and lead author of the study. "Because of the potential consequences of maternal/fetal thyroid disruption on neural and cognitive development, we think that our study warrants the need for further investigations on the effect of BPA on thyroid function."

This study was conducted on adult ewes that had multiple pregnancies before being included in the experiment. Some of the pregnant ewes received daily subcutaneous injections of BPA while the remainder were allocated to the control group. Blood samples were taken from jugular blood, amniotic fluid, placenta samples and cord blood to determine levels of BPA, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine. Results showed that maternal and fetal exposure to BPA was associated with disruption of thyroid function of both the pregnant ewes throughout pregnancy and the newborns as characterized by a decrease in circulating thyroxine levels.

"BPA concentrations in the mother blood in this experiment were fluctuating between injections from 15 to 1 time the highest blood levels reported in pregnant women in the literature," notes Viguié. "As a consequence, although this study clearly indicates that BPA has the potential to alter thyroid function in living pregnant animals and their offspring, it cannot be considered as fully conclusive in terms of risk for human health in the actual conditions of exposure of human populations."

"In other words, although our study clearly indicates that BPA-induced thyroid disruption is possible, it does not indicate how probable such a disruption is to occur in real conditions," added Viguié. "Thus, the main merit of our work is to encourage others, including epidemiologists, to scrutinize and qualify carefully such a probability."

Other researchers working on the study include: Séverine Collet, Véronique Gayrard, Nicole Picard-Hagen, Sylvie Puel, Béatrice Roques, Pierre-Louis Toutain and Marlène Lacroix of Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Toxalim, and the Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse (ENVT), Université de Toulouse in France.

The article, "Maternal and fetal exposure to bisphenol A is associated to alterations of thyroid function in pregnant ewes and their newborn lambs," appears in the January 2013 issue of Endocrinology.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society's membership consists of over 15,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at www.endo-society.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

Aaron Lohr | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.endo-society.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tumor surroundings are shown to affect progression of different cancer subtypes
28.05.2015 | Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

nachricht "Hidden" fragrance compound can cause contact allergy
27.05.2015 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wie Solarzellen helfen, Knochenbrüche zu finden

FAU-Forscher verwenden neues Material für Röntgendetektoren

Nicht um Sonnenlicht geht es ihnen, sondern um Röntgenstrahlen: Wissenschaftler der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) haben zusammen mit...

Im Focus: Festkörper-Photonik ermöglicht extrem kurzwellige UV-Strahlung

Mit ultrakurzen Laserpulsen haben Wissenschaftler aus dem Labor für Attosekundenphysik in dünnen dielektrischen Schichten EUV-Strahlung erzeugt und die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen untersucht.

Das Jahr 1961, die Erfindung des Lasers lag erst kurz zurück, markierte den Beginn der nichtlinearen Optik und Photonik. Denn erstmals war es Wissenschaftlern...

Im Focus: Solid-state photonics goes extreme ultraviolet

Using ultrashort laser pulses, scientists in Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have demonstrated the emission of extreme ultraviolet radiation from thin dielectric films and have investigated the underlying mechanisms.

In 1961, only shortly after the invention of the first laser, scientists exposed silicon dioxide crystals (also known as quartz) to an intense ruby laser to...

Im Focus: Szenario 2050: Ein Wurmloch in Big Apple

Andy ist Physiker und wohnt in New York. Obwohl er schon seit fünf Jahren im Big Apple arbeitet, ist ihm die Stadt immer noch fremd – zu laut, zu hektisch, zu schmutzig. Wie soll das in Zukunft weitergehen? Die Antwort erfährt er prompt – und am eigenen Leib.

„New York – die Stadt, die niemals schläft.“ Lieber Franky Boy Sinatra, ich bin ganz bei Dir. Schon 1977 hattest du mit deinem Song ganz recht. Einen wichtigen...

Im Focus: Auf der Suche nach Leben in ausserirdischen Ozeanen

Grosse Ehre für Nicolas Thomas von der Universität Bern: Der Forscher wurde zum Mitglied des Kamerateams der NASA-Mission «Europa Clipper» ernannt. Mit ihrer Hilfe soll die Frage beantwortet werden, ob es in den Ozeanen des Jupiter-Mondes «Europa» Leben gibt.

Gibt es Leben im All? Antworten auf diese Frage erhofft sich die US-Weltraumbehörde NASA von der Mission «Europa Clipper». Das Ziel der in der Planungsphase...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

13. Koblenzer eLearning Tage

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Tour Eucor 2015: mehr als 700 Kilometer durch drei Länder

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Deutsches Klima-Konsortium zu den Perspektiven für die Klimaforschung bis 2025

28.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Siemens erstmals erfolgreich mit H-Klasse-Gasturbinen in Mexiko

28.05.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Daimler hat die größte CAD-Software Umstellung der letzten Jahrzehnte erfolgreich abgeschlossen

28.05.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Zwei Hormone für den Pollen

28.05.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie