Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Hunter-gatherers ate lean cuts

26.03.2002


Wild meat healthier than farmed cattle.



Wild meats gnawed by ancient hunters contain healthier fats than modern farmed cattle. This finding backs the idea that a palaeolithic diet is the key to good health.

Fifteen thousand years ago, cheeseburgers and chicken wings weren’t on the menu. Before the advent of agriculture, humans ate whatever meat and fish they could catch, plus seeds and plants that they gathered.


Humans were healthier for it, claims Lauren Cordain of Colorado State University in Fort Collins. He and his colleagues have shown that meat from wild elk, deer and antelope contain more beneficial types of fat than meat from today’s grain-fed cattle1.

Reverting to our ancestor’s diet might help to fight the global spread of obesity and associated diseases, Cordain thinks. "We should try and raise our meat so it emulates wild meat," he says.

Hunter eats best

Cordain is one of several researchers who recommend the palaeolithic diet - one that mimics that of the hunter-gatherers.

This rules out farmed foods such as dairy products, refined cereals, added fats and salt. Staples are instead lean meat, fish, fresh fruit and vegetables. Prize cuts are the oily brain and bone marrow of a kill. Unlike many greasy foods today, these are rich in healthier fats.

Palaeodiet advocates think that humans evolved to eat and live as hunter-gatherers did, and have not had time to adapt to the modern lifestyle of factory foods and sloth. "We believe there’s a discordance between environmental conditions we were selected for and those we live in now," says Cordain.

The theory is partly based on studies of contemporary hunter-gatherer societies. Staffan Lindeberg of Lund University in Sweden, for example, found that islanders in Papua New Guinea who eat yams, fruit, fish and coconut rarely suffer from heart disease. "The best diet for us now would be something similar to this," he says.

Conveniently, the palaeodiet fits fairly well with standard dietary advice. How closely it represents the ancestral menu, however, is disputed.

Existing hunter-gatherer societies do not necessarily represent past ones, argues anthropologist Stanley Ulijaszek of the University of Oxford, UK. Past populations living in different parts of the world had very different diets - Inuits might have eaten meat virtually exclusively, others may have lived mainly on vegetables.

But even though the exact proportions cannot be specified, the principle of eliminating agricultural products is nonetheless sound, argues Lindeberg. He is starting to test whether the regime can reduce the incidence of Western killers such as heart disease and diabetes.

Wannabe hunter-gatherers will have to do more than choose lean steak, however. "You have to exercise like our ancestors too," points out Barry Bogin, who studies anthoropology and obesity at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Wild at heart

Cordain and his team compared the muscle, brain, bone marrow and fat of wild animals with those of cattle. A wild steak has 2 per cent total fat, as opposed to the 5-7 per cent in lean beef, they found. Wild tissues also contain more omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in oily fish and have been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease.

Meat from pasture-grazed cattle resembled wild meat more closely than did meat from cows that were intensively raised on grains such as corn and sorghum. But some argue that less intensive farming techniques will not produce sufficient meat to feed the world’s population. "There’s no way you can support six billion people on that kind of diet," says Bogin.

References
  1. Cordain, L. et al. Fatty acid analysis of wild ruminant tissues: evolutionary implications for reducting diet-related chronic disease. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56, 181 - 191, (2002).


HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt
18.10.2017 | Universität Bern

nachricht Aromatherapie bei COPD
12.05.2015 | Airnergy AG

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Schnelle individualisierte Therapiewahl durch Sortierung von Biomolekülen und Zellen mit Licht

Im Blut zirkulierende Biomoleküle und Zellen sind Träger diagnostischer Information, deren Analyse hochwirksame, individuelle Therapien ermöglichen. Um diese Information zu erschließen, haben Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Lasertechnik ILT ein Mikrochip-basiertes Diagnosegerät entwickelt: Der »AnaLighter« analysiert und sortiert klinisch relevante Biomoleküle und Zellen in einer Blutprobe mit Licht. Dadurch können Frühdiagnosen beispielsweise von Tumor- sowie Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen gestellt und patientenindividuelle Therapien eingeleitet werden. Experten des Fraunhofer ILT stellen diese Technologie vom 13.–16. November auf der COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf vor.

Der »AnaLighter« ist ein kompaktes Diagnosegerät zum Sortieren von Zellen und Biomolekülen. Sein technologischer Kern basiert auf einem optisch schaltbaren...

Im Focus: Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt

Eine gemeinsame Studie der Universität Bern und des Inselspitals Bern zeigt, dass spezielle Bindegewebszellen, die in normalen Blutgefässen die Wände abdichten, bei Lungenkrebs nicht mehr richtig funktionieren. Zusätzlich unterdrücken sie die immunologische Bekämpfung des Tumors. Die Resultate legen nahe, dass diese Zellen ein neues Ziel für die Immuntherapie gegen Lungenkarzinome sein könnten.

Lungenkarzinome sind die häufigste Krebsform weltweit. Jährlich werden 1.8 Millionen Neudiagnosen gestellt; und 2016 starben 1.6 Millionen Menschen an der...

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Mobilität 4.0: Konferenz an der Jacobs University

18.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Smart MES 2017: die Fertigung der Zukunft

18.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - Dezember 2017

17.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Schnelle individualisierte Therapiewahl durch Sortierung von Biomolekülen und Zellen mit Licht

18.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Biokunststoffe könnten auch in Traktoren die Richtung angeben

18.10.2017 | Messenachrichten

»ILIGHTS«-Studie gestartet: Licht soll Wohlbefinden von Schichtarbeitern verbessern

18.10.2017 | Energie und Elektrotechnik