Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Hunter-gatherers ate lean cuts

26.03.2002


Wild meat healthier than farmed cattle.



Wild meats gnawed by ancient hunters contain healthier fats than modern farmed cattle. This finding backs the idea that a palaeolithic diet is the key to good health.

Fifteen thousand years ago, cheeseburgers and chicken wings weren’t on the menu. Before the advent of agriculture, humans ate whatever meat and fish they could catch, plus seeds and plants that they gathered.


Humans were healthier for it, claims Lauren Cordain of Colorado State University in Fort Collins. He and his colleagues have shown that meat from wild elk, deer and antelope contain more beneficial types of fat than meat from today’s grain-fed cattle1.

Reverting to our ancestor’s diet might help to fight the global spread of obesity and associated diseases, Cordain thinks. "We should try and raise our meat so it emulates wild meat," he says.

Hunter eats best

Cordain is one of several researchers who recommend the palaeolithic diet - one that mimics that of the hunter-gatherers.

This rules out farmed foods such as dairy products, refined cereals, added fats and salt. Staples are instead lean meat, fish, fresh fruit and vegetables. Prize cuts are the oily brain and bone marrow of a kill. Unlike many greasy foods today, these are rich in healthier fats.

Palaeodiet advocates think that humans evolved to eat and live as hunter-gatherers did, and have not had time to adapt to the modern lifestyle of factory foods and sloth. "We believe there’s a discordance between environmental conditions we were selected for and those we live in now," says Cordain.

The theory is partly based on studies of contemporary hunter-gatherer societies. Staffan Lindeberg of Lund University in Sweden, for example, found that islanders in Papua New Guinea who eat yams, fruit, fish and coconut rarely suffer from heart disease. "The best diet for us now would be something similar to this," he says.

Conveniently, the palaeodiet fits fairly well with standard dietary advice. How closely it represents the ancestral menu, however, is disputed.

Existing hunter-gatherer societies do not necessarily represent past ones, argues anthropologist Stanley Ulijaszek of the University of Oxford, UK. Past populations living in different parts of the world had very different diets - Inuits might have eaten meat virtually exclusively, others may have lived mainly on vegetables.

But even though the exact proportions cannot be specified, the principle of eliminating agricultural products is nonetheless sound, argues Lindeberg. He is starting to test whether the regime can reduce the incidence of Western killers such as heart disease and diabetes.

Wannabe hunter-gatherers will have to do more than choose lean steak, however. "You have to exercise like our ancestors too," points out Barry Bogin, who studies anthoropology and obesity at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Wild at heart

Cordain and his team compared the muscle, brain, bone marrow and fat of wild animals with those of cattle. A wild steak has 2 per cent total fat, as opposed to the 5-7 per cent in lean beef, they found. Wild tissues also contain more omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in oily fish and have been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease.

Meat from pasture-grazed cattle resembled wild meat more closely than did meat from cows that were intensively raised on grains such as corn and sorghum. But some argue that less intensive farming techniques will not produce sufficient meat to feed the world’s population. "There’s no way you can support six billion people on that kind of diet," says Bogin.

References
  1. Cordain, L. et al. Fatty acid analysis of wild ruminant tissues: evolutionary implications for reducting diet-related chronic disease. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56, 181 - 191, (2002).


HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Entschlüsselung von Kommunikationswegen zwischen Tumor- und Immunzellen beim Eierstockkrebs
06.12.2016 | Wilhelm Sander-Stiftung

nachricht Tempo-Daten für das „Navi“ im Kopf
06.12.2016 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Gravitationswellen als Sensor für Dunkle Materie

Die mit der Entdeckung von Gravitationswellen entstandene neue Disziplin der Gravitationswellen-Astronomie bekommt eine weitere Aufgabe: die Suche nach Dunkler Materie. Diese könnte aus einem Bose-Einstein-Kondensat sehr leichter Teilchen bestehen. Wie Rechnungen zeigen, würden Gravitationswellen gebremst, wenn sie durch derartige Dunkle Materie laufen. Dies führt zu einer Verspätung von Gravitationswellen relativ zu Licht, die bereits mit den heutigen Detektoren messbar sein sollte.

Im Universum muss es gut fünfmal mehr unsichtbare als sichtbare Materie geben. Woraus diese Dunkle Materie besteht, ist immer noch unbekannt. Die...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Wie sich Zellen gegen Salmonellen verteidigen

Bioinformatiker der Goethe-Universität haben das erste mathematische Modell für einen zentralen Verteidigungsmechanismus der Zelle gegen das Bakterium Salmonella entwickelt. Sie können ihren experimentell arbeitenden Kollegen damit wertvolle Anregungen zur Aufklärung der beteiligten Signalwege geben.

Jedes Jahr sind Salmonellen weltweit für Millionen von Infektionen und tausende Todesfälle verantwortlich. Die Körperzellen können sich aber gegen die...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Greifswalder Forscher dringen mit superauflösendem Mikroskop in zellulären Mikrokosmos ein

Das Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie weiht am Montag, 05.12.2016, mit einem wissenschaftlichen Symposium das erste Superresolution-Mikroskop in Greifswald ein. Das Forschungsmikroskop wurde von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) und dem Land Mecklenburg-Vorpommern finanziert. Nun können die Greifswalder Wissenschaftler Strukturen bis zu einer Größe von einigen Millionstel Millimetern mittels Laserlicht sichtbar machen.

Weit über hundert Jahre lang galt die von Ernst Abbe 1873 publizierte Theorie zur Auflösungsgrenze von Lichtmikroskopen als ein in Stein gemeißeltes Gesetz....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Wie aus reinen Daten ein verständliches Bild entsteht

05.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Von „Coopetition“ bis „Digitale Union“ – Die Fertigungsindustrien im digitalen Wandel

02.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Experten diskutieren Perspektiven schrumpfender Regionen

01.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Weiterbildung zu statistischen Methoden in der Versuchsplanung und -auswertung

06.12.2016 | Seminare Workshops

Bund fördert Entwicklung sicherer Schnellladetechnik für Hochleistungsbatterien mit 2,5 Millionen

06.12.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Innovationen für eine nachhaltige Forstwirtschaft

06.12.2016 | Agrar- Forstwissenschaften