Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Smallpox, big problem?


The smallpox virus: an epidemic could be devastating.

Smallpox would spread rapidly through an unprotected world.

If smallpox were to return, the disease would spread as fast as it did before vaccination, a new model suggests1. Swift detection and rapid intervention would be essential to control an outbreak.

The end of vaccination and the loss of natural immunity mean the effects of a smallpox epidemic could be devastating. This is despite the fact that about half the people in the West have already been vaccinated against the virus.

"The predicted scale of an epidemic would increase disproportionately over time, especially in the earlier stages," says Steve Leach at the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research in Porton Down, UK.

The results give a gloomier prognosis than another recent smallpox model by researchers at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta2. This concluded that the United States has enough vaccine to control a smallpox outbreak.

Gone but not forgotten

Fear of bioterrorism has put smallpox - officially eradicated in 1979 - back at the top of public health agendas. Leach and his colleague Raymond Gani scoured historical records of smallpox outbreaks to estimate how fast the disease would spread in today’s population.

They analysed smallpox epidemics before vaccination, such as in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1721, and after vaccination, such as in London in the twentieth century. They also estimated the degree of natural immunity due to previous exposure to the virus.

For each outbreak they estimated the average number of secondary infections that each smallpox case caused.

They found that each case of smallpox will probably lead to between four and six cases - but as many as 10-12 at the beginning of an outbreak before the disease is detected. Leach and Gani’s numbers could be especially useful to disaster planners in these initial stages.

These figures are similar to transmission rates in the English town of Burford in 1758, where the population was largely susceptible to the disease. "They had not experienced a smallpox outbreak for some considerable time," says Leach. About 14% of the population of Burford died from smallpox that year.

It’s good to put firm figures on the rate at which smallpox would spread, says Jaques Valleron, an epidemiologist at the St Antoine Institute for Health Research in Paris.

But, he argues, the quality of disease surveillance and the distribution of vaccine stocks would be far more important to controlling an outbreak than theoretical knowledge. "If there were a biowar with smallpox, the main problems would be largely practical," Valleron says.

The recent CDC study, unlike Leach’s, took logistical factors and response rates into account. But the CDC’s rosier picture might result from its having ignored the natural immunity that protected past populations, says Leach. This might lead us to underestimate the measures needed to control an epidemic, he says.


  1. Gani, R. & Leach, S. Transmission potential of smallpox in contemporary populations. Nature, 414, 748 - 751, (2001).
  2. Meltzer, M. I., Damon, I., LeDuc, J. W. & Millar, J. D. Modelling potential responses to smallpox as a bioterrorist weapon. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 7, 959 - 969, (2001).

TOM CLARKE | © Nature News Service
Weitere Informationen:

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Dickdarmkrebs: Krebssignale blockieren
22.03.2018 | Deutsche Krebshilfe

nachricht Mit Letermovir lebensbedrohlichen Cytomegalievirus-Infektionen vorbeugen
21.03.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Würzburg

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forscher entdecken neues Anti-Krebs-Protein

Ein internationales Forscherteam hat ein neues Anti-Krebs-Protein entdeckt. Das Protein namens LHPP verhindert, dass sich Krebszellen in der Leber ungebremst vermehren. Zudem eignet es sich als Biomarker für die Diagnose und Prognose von Leberzellkrebs. Dies berichten Forscher unter der Leitung von Prof. Michael N. Hall vom Biozentrum der Universität Basel in «Nature».

Die Häufigkeit von Leberkrebs, auch bekannt als Leberzellkarzinom, nimmt stetig zu. In der Schweiz hat sich die Zahl der Erkrankungen in den letzten zwanzig...

Im Focus: Researchers Discover New Anti-Cancer Protein

An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Prof. Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in “Nature” that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.

The incidence of liver cancer, also known as hepatocellular carcinoma, is steadily increasing. In the last twenty years, the number of cases has almost doubled...

Im Focus: LifeTime – ein visionärer Vorschlag für ein EU-Flagschiff

Zuverlässig vorherzusagen, wann eine Krankheit ausbricht oder wie sie verläuft, erscheint wie ein Traum. Ein europäisches Konsortium will ihn Wirklichkeit werden lassen und dabei vor allem neue Technologien der Einzelzellbiologie nutzen. Führende Forscherinnen und Forscher haben daher einen Antrag für ein FET-Flagschiff mit dem Namen LifeTime eingereicht.

Nachdem das Humangenomprojekt 2001 abgeschlossen war, haben Wissenschaft und Medien das Genom als „Buch des Lebens“ bezeichnet. Darin könne man nachlesen, wie...

Im Focus: Forscher des Fraunhofer FHR begleiten Wiedereintritt der chinesischen Raumstation Tiangong-1

Die chinesische Raumstation Tiangong-1 wird in wenigen Wochen in die Erdatmosphäre eintreten und zu einem großen Teil verglühen. Dabei können auch Trümmerteile den Erdboden erreichen. Tiangong-1 kreist unkontrolliert und mit ca. 29 000 km/h um die Erde. Die Wiedereintrittsprognose kann derzeit nur im Bereich von mehreren Tagen angegeben werden. Die Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer FHR in Wachtberg bei Bonn beobachten Tiangong-1 bereits seit Wochen mit ihrem TIRA (Tracking and Imaging Radar) System, einem der leistungsfähigsten Radare zur Weltraumbeobachtung weltweit, um das nationale Weltraumlagezentrum und die ESA mit ihrer Expertise bei den Wiedereintrittsprognosen zu unterstützen.

Nach Verlust des Funkkontakts mit Tiangong-1 im Jahr 2016 ist es aufgrund der niedrigen Bahnhöhe unausweichlich, dass die chinesische Raumstation in die...

Im Focus: Researchers at Fraunhofer monitor re-entry of Chinese space station Tiangong-1

In just a few weeks from now, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere where it will to a large extent burn up. It is possible that some debris will reach the Earth's surface. Tiangong-1 is orbiting the Earth uncontrolled at a speed of approx. 29,000 km/h.Currently the prognosis relating to the time of impact currently lies within a window of several days. The scientists at Fraunhofer FHR have already been monitoring Tiangong-1 for a number of weeks with their TIRA system, one of the most powerful space observation radars in the world, with a view to supporting the German Space Situational Awareness Center and the ESA with their re-entry forecasts.

Following the loss of radio contact with Tiangong-1 in 2016 and due to the low orbital height, it is now inevitable that the Chinese space station will...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



Industrie & Wirtschaft

Hybrid-elektrisch angetriebene Verkehrsflugzeuge – Zukunft oder Fiktion?

20.03.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Konferenz zur virtuellen Realität kommt nach Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Veranstaltungen zur Digitalisierung in der Weiterbildung

19.03.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Stabile Biradikale erzeugt

22.03.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Nord-Süd-Kooperation im Kampf gegen Tuberkulose

22.03.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Kommunikation per Kalziumwelle

22.03.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics