Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Nuclear weapon blasts tumours

16.11.2001


Radioactive reactions could blast cancers cells from within.
© Photodisc / NSU


Actinium-225 lasts long enough to target tumours.


A miniature radioactive reaction wipes out cancer cells

A tiny nuclear bomb planted inside cancer cells blows them apart. US researchers are turning nuclear waste into potent weapons to target tumours.

Currently, the radiation used to kill cancerous cells is difficult to aim and can hit surrounding healthy tissue. Using antibodies that recognize cancer proteins and are taken up into cells, researchers at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York are sneaking radioactivity directly into cancerous cells1.



The team attaches the radioactive element actinium-225 to the antibodies. This unstable atom decays to release high-energy alpha particles, a potent but short-range form of radiation that kills only a few surrounding cells. Cancerous mice injected with the combination often survive longer, the group shows, and their tumours shrink.

"This approach is exciting," says Paul Carter, who works on antibody targeting at Immunex Corporation in Seattle, Washington. Actinium-225 is particularly potent as it makes a quadruple hit: decay triggers a chain reaction that releases four alpha particles. So the therapy would work at low doses, reducing side-effects. In contrast, targeted toxic chemicals can require thousands of molecules to kill a cell.

The radiation also kills neighbouring cells, which is advantageous for penetrating tumours. But it may harm healthy tissue, says Carter. This effect is "very short-range and hopefully beneficial," he adds.

Nuclear power

Finding a radioactive isotope that lasts long enough has stalled the development of targeted radiotherapy, explains Michael Zalutsky of the Duke University Medical Centre in Durham. Only two others, bismuth-213 and astatine-211 have been tried. Both have short half-lives, so have to be made and used within 46 minutes or 7 hours, respectively - otherwise they decay too much before they reach the tumour.

Actinium-225 has a 10-day half life. "You could ship it all over the world," says Zalutsky. "It looks very effective." He is pursuing clinical trials with astatine-211 on brain tumours.

The isotopes are extracted from stockpiles of nuclear waste, of which there is no shortage. David Scheinberg, leader of the Sloan-Kettering team, calls the recycling "our swords into ploughshares programme".

As to how this approach stacks up among the arsenal of treatments being developed to fight cancer, "time and ultimately clinical trials will tell", says Carter. Scheinberg hopes to start human trials within the next few months.

References
  1. McDevitt, M.R. et al. Tumour therapy with targeted atomic nanogenerators. Science, 294, 1537 - 1540, (2001).

    HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service
    Weitere Informationen:
    http://www.nature.com/nsu/011122/011122-2.html

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Lymphdrüsenkrebs programmiert Immunzellen zur Förderung des eigenen Wachstums um
22.02.2018 | Wilhelm Sander-Stiftung

nachricht Forscher entdecken neuen Signalweg zur Herzmuskelverdickung
22.02.2018 | Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

Mit Hilfe einer neuen Lasertechnologie haben es Physiker vom Labor für Attosekundenphysik der LMU und des MPQ geschafft, Attosekunden-Lichtblitze mit hoher Intensität und Photonenenergie zu produzieren. Damit konnten sie erstmals die Interaktion mehrere Photonen in einem Attosekundenpuls mit Elektronen aus einer inneren atomaren Schale beobachten konnten.

Wer die ultraschnelle Bewegung von Elektronen in inneren atomaren Schalen beobachten möchte, der benötigt ultrakurze und intensive Lichtblitze bei genügend...

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

Eine Gruppe von Forschern um Andrea Cavalleri am Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie (MPSD) in Hamburg hat eine Methode demonstriert, die es erlaubt die interatomaren Kräfte eines Festkörpers detailliert auszumessen. Ihr Artikel Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, nun online in Nature veröffentlich, erläutert, wie Terahertz-Laserpulse die Atome eines Festkörpers zu extrem hohen Auslenkungen treiben können.

Die zeitaufgelöste Messung der sehr unkonventionellen atomaren Bewegungen, die einer Anregung mit extrem starken Lichtpulsen folgen, ermöglichte es der...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Verlässliche Quantencomputer entwickeln

Internationalem Forschungsteam gelingt wichtiger Schritt auf dem Weg zur Lösung von Zertifizierungsproblemen

Quantencomputer sollen künftig algorithmische Probleme lösen, die selbst die größten klassischen Superrechner überfordern. Doch wie lässt sich prüfen, dass der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Von festen Körpern und Philosophen

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Spannungsfeld Elektromobilität

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2018

21.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

23.02.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Wirt oder Gast? Proteomik gibt neue Aufschlüsse über Reaktion von Rifforganismen auf Umweltstress

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Wie Zellen unterschiedlich auf Stress reagieren

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics