Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Fat is not a hedonist issue

12.11.2001


Scientists are trying to work out how fat fits into our genes
© Corbis


Thinness is more than a matter of taste.

Greasy sausage roll or juicy apple? Our choice of snacks cannot be explained by a taste for fat, nutrition researchers now suggest. By hunting down the genetic secrets of the skinny, they hope to help those prone to piling on the pounds.

Some lucky people munch chips and chocolate and never gain an ounce. Their choice of diet is not down to fondness for fatty flavours, say appetite researchers John Blundell and John Cooling of the University of Leeds1.



The duo compared two lean but extreme dietary groups: one usually eat fatty meat and dairy foods, the other consume more cereals, bread, fruit and vegetables. Asked to rate the taste of solutions ranging from skimmed milk (0.1% fat) to double cream (48%), both groups were indifferent to the creamier choice.

The study suggests that it is habits and social expectations - the subjects were all students - rather than a trick of the taste buds that have people heading for a fry-up at lunchtime. Blundell admits, however, that a real meal also has texture and shape. "It’s still possible that they get more enjoyment from a meat pie," he says.

Thin on the ground

Exactly how the enviable beanpoles of the population eat without gaining weight has made them the focus of a pan-European obesity study. "They have an underlying ability to handle a mass of fat," says project head Julian Mercer of the Rowlett Research Institute in Aberdeen, UK.

The study hopes to identify the genes and proteins that render the eternally thin resistant to weight gain. These might include enzymes involved in storing and breaking down fat. These leads could be used to identify genetic variations that make others susceptible to obesity.

Like screening for breast cancer, people with a predisposition to weight gain could be spotted early and targeted with diets, advice or drugs. With proper diagnosis and treatment, obesity could lose some of its social stigma, hopes Mercer, and be controlled like any other disease.

A changing environment, rather than changing genes, is to blame for the current obesity epidemic in the developed world. Our penchant for sweet and fatty foods probably evolved to save our ancestors from starvation. But in the modern, inactive and food-saturated world, some people’s genetic background is making this predilection a problem.

Encouraging people to change their diet and lifestyle in order to lose weight has proved difficult. "There is no evidence on a population level that it’s working," says obesity researcher Ian Macdonald of Nottingham University, UK, hence the shift of focus to genetics.

Studying those who ignore dietary advice but are seemingly immune to the consequences is an interesting approach to pinpointing genetic susceptibilities, Macdonald thinks. But, he points out, Blundell and Cooling’s slim students may simply be more active then average. Once stuck behind a desk, they too might succumb to middle-age spread. "I’d wage a modest bet on it," he says.

References

  1. Cooling, J. & Blundell, J. E. High-fat and low-fat phenotypes: habitual eating of high- and low-fat foods not related to taste preference for fat. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 55, 1016 - 1021, (2001).


HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Aromatherapie bei COPD
12.05.2015 | Airnergy AG

nachricht Chronische Wunden können heilen
16.10.2017 | Universitätsklinik der Ruhr-Universität Bochum - Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW Bad Oeynhausen

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smarte Sensoren für effiziente Prozesse

Materialfehler im Endprodukt können in vielen Industriebereichen zu frühzeitigem Versagen führen und den sicheren Gebrauch der Erzeugnisse massiv beeinträchtigen. Eine Schlüsselrolle im Rahmen der Qualitätssicherung kommt daher intelligenten, zerstörungsfreien Sensorsystemen zu, die es erlauben, Bauteile schnell und kostengünstig zu prüfen, ohne das Material selbst zu beschädigen oder die Oberfläche zu verändern. Experten des Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken präsentieren vom 7. bis 10. November 2017 auf der Blechexpo in Stuttgart zwei Exponate, die eine schnelle, zuverlässige und automatisierte Materialcharakterisierung und Fehlerbestimmung ermöglichen (Halle 5, Stand 5306).

Bei Verwendung zeitaufwändiger zerstörender Prüfverfahren zieht die Qualitätsprüfung durch die Beschädigung oder Zerstörung der Produkte enorme Kosten nach...

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Kalte Moleküle auf Kollisionskurs

Mit einer neuen Kühlmethode gelingt Wissenschaftlern am MPQ die Beobachtung von Stößen in einem dichten Strahl aus kalten und langsamen dipolaren Molekülen.

Wie verlaufen chemische Reaktionen bei extrem tiefen Temperaturen? Um diese Frage zu beantworten, benötigt man molekulare Proben, die gleichzeitig kalt, dicht...

Im Focus: Astronomen entdecken ungewöhnliche spindelförmige Galaxien

Galaxien als majestätische, rotierende Sternscheiben? Nicht bei den spindelförmigen Galaxien, die von Athanasia Tsatsi (Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie) und ihren Kollegen untersucht wurden. Mit Hilfe der CALIFA-Umfrage fanden die Astronomen heraus, dass diese schlanken Galaxien, die sich um ihre Längsachse drehen, weitaus häufiger sind als bisher angenommen. Mit den neuen Daten konnten die Astronomen außerdem ein Modell dafür entwickeln, wie die spindelförmigen Galaxien aus einer speziellen Art von Verschmelzung zweier Spiralgalaxien entstehen. Die Ergebnisse wurden in der Zeitschrift Astronomy & Astrophysics veröffentlicht.

Wenn die meisten Menschen an Galaxien denken, dürften sie an majestätische Spiralgalaxien wie die unserer Heimatgalaxie denken, der Milchstraße: Milliarden von...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Meeresbiologe Mark E. Hay zu Gast bei den "Noblen Gesprächen" am Beutenberg Campus in Jena

16.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

bionection 2017 erstmals in Thüringen: Biotech-Spitzenforschung trifft in Jena auf Weltmarktführer

13.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Tagung „Energieeffiziente Abluftreinigung“ zeigt, wie man durch Luftreinhaltemaßnahmen profitieren kann

13.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

ESO-Teleskope beobachten erstes Licht einer Gravitationswellen-Quelle

16.10.2017 | Physik Astronomie

Was läuft schief beim Noonan-Syndrom? – Grundlagen der neuronalen Fehlfunktion entdeckt

16.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Gewebe mit Hilfe von Stammzellen regenerieren

16.10.2017 | Förderungen Preise