Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Fat is not a hedonist issue

12.11.2001


Scientists are trying to work out how fat fits into our genes
© Corbis


Thinness is more than a matter of taste.

Greasy sausage roll or juicy apple? Our choice of snacks cannot be explained by a taste for fat, nutrition researchers now suggest. By hunting down the genetic secrets of the skinny, they hope to help those prone to piling on the pounds.

Some lucky people munch chips and chocolate and never gain an ounce. Their choice of diet is not down to fondness for fatty flavours, say appetite researchers John Blundell and John Cooling of the University of Leeds1.



The duo compared two lean but extreme dietary groups: one usually eat fatty meat and dairy foods, the other consume more cereals, bread, fruit and vegetables. Asked to rate the taste of solutions ranging from skimmed milk (0.1% fat) to double cream (48%), both groups were indifferent to the creamier choice.

The study suggests that it is habits and social expectations - the subjects were all students - rather than a trick of the taste buds that have people heading for a fry-up at lunchtime. Blundell admits, however, that a real meal also has texture and shape. "It’s still possible that they get more enjoyment from a meat pie," he says.

Thin on the ground

Exactly how the enviable beanpoles of the population eat without gaining weight has made them the focus of a pan-European obesity study. "They have an underlying ability to handle a mass of fat," says project head Julian Mercer of the Rowlett Research Institute in Aberdeen, UK.

The study hopes to identify the genes and proteins that render the eternally thin resistant to weight gain. These might include enzymes involved in storing and breaking down fat. These leads could be used to identify genetic variations that make others susceptible to obesity.

Like screening for breast cancer, people with a predisposition to weight gain could be spotted early and targeted with diets, advice or drugs. With proper diagnosis and treatment, obesity could lose some of its social stigma, hopes Mercer, and be controlled like any other disease.

A changing environment, rather than changing genes, is to blame for the current obesity epidemic in the developed world. Our penchant for sweet and fatty foods probably evolved to save our ancestors from starvation. But in the modern, inactive and food-saturated world, some people’s genetic background is making this predilection a problem.

Encouraging people to change their diet and lifestyle in order to lose weight has proved difficult. "There is no evidence on a population level that it’s working," says obesity researcher Ian Macdonald of Nottingham University, UK, hence the shift of focus to genetics.

Studying those who ignore dietary advice but are seemingly immune to the consequences is an interesting approach to pinpointing genetic susceptibilities, Macdonald thinks. But, he points out, Blundell and Cooling’s slim students may simply be more active then average. Once stuck behind a desk, they too might succumb to middle-age spread. "I’d wage a modest bet on it," he says.

References

  1. Cooling, J. & Blundell, J. E. High-fat and low-fat phenotypes: habitual eating of high- and low-fat foods not related to taste preference for fat. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 55, 1016 - 1021, (2001).


HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Wachablösung im Immunsystem: wie Dendritische Zellen ihre Bewaffnung an Mastzellen übergeben
16.11.2017 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

nachricht Wie Lungenkrebs zur Entstehung von Lungenhochdruck führt
16.11.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kleine Strukturen – große Wirkung

Innovative Schutzschicht für geringen Verbrauch künftiger Rolls-Royce Flugtriebwerke entwickelt

Gemeinsam mit Rolls-Royce Deutschland hat das Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS im Rahmen von zwei Vorhaben aus dem...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: Transparente Beschichtung für Alltagsanwendungen

Sport- und Outdoorbekleidung, die Wasser und Schmutz abweist, oder Windschutzscheiben, an denen kein Wasser kondensiert – viele alltägliche Produkte können von stark wasserabweisenden Beschichtungen profitieren. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) haben Forscher um Dr. Bastian E. Rapp einen Werkstoff für solche Beschichtungen entwickelt, der sowohl transparent als auch abriebfest ist: „Fluoropor“, einen fluorierten Polymerschaum mit durchgehender Nano-/Mikrostruktur. Sie stellen ihn in Nature Scientific Reports vor. (DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-15287-8)

In der Natur ist das Phänomen vor allem bei Lotuspflanzen bekannt: Wassertropfen perlen von der Blattoberfläche einfach ab. Diesen Lotuseffekt ahmen...

Im Focus: Ultrakalte chemische Prozesse: Physikern gelingt beispiellose Vermessung auf Quantenniveau

Wissenschaftler um den Ulmer Physikprofessor Johannes Hecker Denschlag haben chemische Prozesse mit einer beispiellosen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau vermessen. Bei ihrer wissenschaftlichen Arbeit kombinierten die Forscher Theorie und Experiment und können so erstmals die Produktzustandsverteilung über alle Quantenzustände hinweg - unmittelbar nach der Molekülbildung - nachvollziehen. Die Forscher haben ihre Erkenntnisse in der renommierten Fachzeitschrift "Science" publiziert. Durch die Ergebnisse wird ein tieferes Verständnis zunehmend komplexer chemischer Reaktionen möglich, das zukünftig genutzt werden kann, um Reaktionsprozesse auf Quantenniveau zu steuern.

Einer deutsch-amerikanischen Forschergruppe ist es gelungen, chemische Prozesse mit einer nie dagewesenen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau zu vermessen. Dadurch...

Im Focus: Leoniden 2017: Sternschnuppen im Anflug?

Gemeinsame Pressemitteilung der Vereinigung der Sternfreunde und des Hauses der Astronomie in Heidelberg

Die Sternschnuppen der Leoniden sind in diesem Jahr gut zu beobachten, da kein Mondlicht stört. Experten sagen für die Nächte vom 16. auf den 17. und vom 17....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

IfBB bei 12th European Bioplastics Conference mit dabei: neue Marktzahlen, neue Forschungsthemen

22.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Zahnimplantate: Forschungsergebnisse und ihre Konsequenzen – 31. Kongress der DGI

22.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Tagung widmet sich dem Thema Autonomes Fahren

21.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Bakterien als Schrittmacher des Darms

22.11.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Ozeanversauerung schädigt Miesmuscheln im Frühstadium

22.11.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Die gefrorenen Küsten der Arktis: Ein Lebensraum schmilzt davon

22.11.2017 | Geowissenschaften