Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Fat is not a hedonist issue

12.11.2001


Scientists are trying to work out how fat fits into our genes
© Corbis


Thinness is more than a matter of taste.

Greasy sausage roll or juicy apple? Our choice of snacks cannot be explained by a taste for fat, nutrition researchers now suggest. By hunting down the genetic secrets of the skinny, they hope to help those prone to piling on the pounds.

Some lucky people munch chips and chocolate and never gain an ounce. Their choice of diet is not down to fondness for fatty flavours, say appetite researchers John Blundell and John Cooling of the University of Leeds1.



The duo compared two lean but extreme dietary groups: one usually eat fatty meat and dairy foods, the other consume more cereals, bread, fruit and vegetables. Asked to rate the taste of solutions ranging from skimmed milk (0.1% fat) to double cream (48%), both groups were indifferent to the creamier choice.

The study suggests that it is habits and social expectations - the subjects were all students - rather than a trick of the taste buds that have people heading for a fry-up at lunchtime. Blundell admits, however, that a real meal also has texture and shape. "It’s still possible that they get more enjoyment from a meat pie," he says.

Thin on the ground

Exactly how the enviable beanpoles of the population eat without gaining weight has made them the focus of a pan-European obesity study. "They have an underlying ability to handle a mass of fat," says project head Julian Mercer of the Rowlett Research Institute in Aberdeen, UK.

The study hopes to identify the genes and proteins that render the eternally thin resistant to weight gain. These might include enzymes involved in storing and breaking down fat. These leads could be used to identify genetic variations that make others susceptible to obesity.

Like screening for breast cancer, people with a predisposition to weight gain could be spotted early and targeted with diets, advice or drugs. With proper diagnosis and treatment, obesity could lose some of its social stigma, hopes Mercer, and be controlled like any other disease.

A changing environment, rather than changing genes, is to blame for the current obesity epidemic in the developed world. Our penchant for sweet and fatty foods probably evolved to save our ancestors from starvation. But in the modern, inactive and food-saturated world, some people’s genetic background is making this predilection a problem.

Encouraging people to change their diet and lifestyle in order to lose weight has proved difficult. "There is no evidence on a population level that it’s working," says obesity researcher Ian Macdonald of Nottingham University, UK, hence the shift of focus to genetics.

Studying those who ignore dietary advice but are seemingly immune to the consequences is an interesting approach to pinpointing genetic susceptibilities, Macdonald thinks. But, he points out, Blundell and Cooling’s slim students may simply be more active then average. Once stuck behind a desk, they too might succumb to middle-age spread. "I’d wage a modest bet on it," he says.

References

  1. Cooling, J. & Blundell, J. E. High-fat and low-fat phenotypes: habitual eating of high- and low-fat foods not related to taste preference for fat. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 55, 1016 - 1021, (2001).


HELEN PEARSON | © Nature News Service

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Allergieforschung: Weltweit erstes automatisches Pollennetz in Bayern am Start
28.09.2016 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Maßgeschneiderte Strategie gegen Glioblastome
26.09.2016 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-Ever 3D Printed Excavator Project Advances Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing R&D

Heavy construction machinery is the focus of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s latest advance in additive manufacturing research. With industry partners and university students, ORNL researchers are designing and producing the world’s first 3D printed excavator, a prototype that will leverage large-scale AM technologies and explore the feasibility of printing with metal alloys.

Increasing the size and speed of metal-based 3D printing techniques, using low-cost alloys like steel and aluminum, could create new industrial applications...

Im Focus: Zielsichere Roboter im Mikromaßstab

Dank einer halbseitigen Beschichtung mit Kohlenstoff lassen sich Mikroschwimmer durch Licht antreiben und steuern

Manche Bakterien zieht es zum Licht, andere in die Dunkelheit. Den einen ermöglicht dieses phototaktische Verhalten, die Sonnenenergie möglichst effizient für...

Im Focus: Experimentalphysik - Protonenstrahlung nach explosiver Vorarbeit

LMU-Physiker haben mit Nanopartikeln und Laserlicht Protonenstrahlung produziert. Sie könnte künftig neue Wege in der Strahlungsmedizin eröffnen und bei der Tumorbekämpfung helfen.

Stark gebündeltes Licht entwickelt eine enorme Kraft. Ein Team um Professor Jörg Schreiber vom Lehrstuhl für Experimentalphysik - Medizinische Physik der LMU...

Im Focus: Der perfekte Sonnensturm

Ein geomagnetischer Sturm hat sich als Glücksfall für die Wissenschaft erwiesen. Jahrzehnte rätselte die Forschung, wie hoch energetische Partikel, die auf die Magnetosphäre der Erde treffen, wieder verschwinden. Jetzt hat Yuri Shprits vom Deutschen GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ und der Universität Potsdam mit einem internationalen Team eine Erklärung gefunden: Entscheidend für den Verlust an Teilchen ist, wie schnell die Partikel sind. Shprits: „Das hilft uns auch, Prozesse auf der Sonne, auf anderen Planeten und sogar in fernen Galaxien zu verstehen.“ Er fügt hinzu: „Die Studie wird uns überdies helfen, das ‚Weltraumwetter‘ besser vorherzusagen und damit wertvolle Satelliten zu schützen.“

Ein geomagnetischer Sturm am 17. Januar 2013 hat sich als Glücksfall für die Wissenschaft erwiesen. Der Sonnensturm ermöglichte einzigartige Beobachtungen, die...

Im Focus: New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of light metals.
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart have now developed two new process variants that will considerably expand the areas of application for friction stir welding.
Technologie-Lizenz-Büro (TLB) GmbH supports the University of Stuttgart in patenting and marketing its innovations.

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Smart Glasses Experience Day

30.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Einzug von Industrie 4.0 und Digitalisierung im Südwesten - Innovationstag der SmartFactoryKL

30.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

"Physics of Cancer" - Forscher diskutieren über biomechanische Eigenschaften von Krebszellen

30.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Smart Glasses Experience Day

30.09.2016 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Materialkompetenz für den Leichtbau: Fraunhofer IMWS präsentiert neue Lösungen auf der K-Messe

30.09.2016 | Messenachrichten

Vom Rollstuhl auf das Liegerad – Mit Funktioneller Elektrostimulation zum Cybathlon

30.09.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik