Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Studies show Tim-3 proteins key to immune responses

31.10.2003


The discovery that a protein present only on the surface of a select group of T-cells functions to inhibit aggressive immune responses could have important implications for organ transplant patients and patients with autoimmune diseases, and could prove equally relevant in the development of vaccines for the treatment of cancer, drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV infections and other viral diseases. The findings from animal studies at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) are described in two separate papers in the November 2003 issue of Nature Immunology.



Known as Tim-3 (T cell immunoglobulin domain, mucin domain), the proteins in question are found on the surface of TH1-helper type T cells, which when activated become the body’s first line of defense against foreign microbes.

... mehr zu:
»BIDMC »BWH »PhD »TH1


"Activated TH1-type helper T cells both participate in and help orchestrate the attack on cells bearing proteins, thereby guarding against infection," explains Terry Strom, MD, Chief of Immunology at BIDMC and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "Nature gave us these cells as a critical defense against microbes."

However, he adds, these same T-cell responses must always be carefully balanced -- left unchecked, they can become overly aggressive, leading to inflammatory tissue injury and resultant autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar problems develop among transplant patients when T-cells mount unnecessary defenses against their new organs, leading to organ rejection.

The two Nature Immunology papers, by senior authors Strom and BWH immunologist Vijay Kuchroo, DVM, PhD, found, for the first time, that Tim-3 proteins selectively serve as "checkpoints" for the immune system, helping to keep activated TH1 T-cell responses under control. Kuchroo is Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

"Knowing that these proteins are not found on the surface of either [non-activated] resting T-cells or on activated T-cells other than TH1 helper cells, we hypothesized that Tim-3 served to limit and control ongoing TH1-dependent immune responses," explains Strom. "The particular pattern of Tim-3 expression that was found in these two studies suggests that it plays a key role in squelching activation of TH1 T-cells. Nature must have wanted us to have such a mechanism so that once you have created immunity, you have a timely means of ’turning off’ the immune attack," he adds.

Strom and his colleagues looked at autoimmune diabetes in mice, a condition known to be caused by a TH1 response against insulin-producing cells. In a mouse model of tissue transplants, they found that mice with no Tim-3 rapidly rejected the transplants, despite receiving treatments that normally ensured transplant survival. Likewise, in their paper, Kuchroo and colleagues demonstrated that Tim-3 deficiency prevented mice from acquiring a state of "immune tolerance," which can normally be attained by administering high doses of protein.

"This clearly shows that one of the primary functions of the Tim-3 molecule is not only to regulate the expansion of TH1 cells, but also to regulate induction of tolerance in these cells," explains Kuchroo. "The method to block the Tim-3/Tim-3L interaction with the soluble Tim-3Ig, though not useful for autoimmunity, may prove very useful in enhancing anti-tumor immunity and anti-microbial immunity." Strom adds that the new findings suggest two important ways in which the Tim-3 pathway could be harnessed: First, by enhancing the Tim-3 signal, the response of TH1 cells could be diminished, thereby creating immune tolerance, and squelching the development of autoimmune diseases or preventing organ rejection.

And second, by blocking the Tim-3 pathway, TH1 responses could be amplified, thereby helping the immune system mount a more vigorous attack against foreign microbes or tumor cells, which could prove to be an important application when used in vaccine development, for example.

"From a therapeutic perspective, the implications of these new findings are intriguing," says Strom.

The Strom study was funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Center for Islet Transplantation at Harvard Medical School; the Kuchroo study was funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the National Institutes of Health.

Co-authors of the Strom paper include lead investigator Alberto Sanchez-Fueyo, MD, Christoph Domenig, MD, and Xin Xiao Zheng, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Jane Tian, Dominic Picarella, Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, PhD, and Anthony Coyle, PhD, of Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Mass.; Catherine Sabotos, MSc, and Vijay Kuchroo, DVM, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Natasha Manlongat of Hammersmith College, London; and Orissa Bender and Thomas Kamradt of Deutsches Rheumaforschungs Zentrum, Berlin. Co-authors of the Kuchroo paper, in addition to Catherine Sabotos, MSc, include BWH researchers Sumone Chakravarti, PhD, Eugene Cha, BA, and Anna Shubart, PhD; and Gordon Freeman of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.


Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is a major patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School, ranking third in National Institutes of Health funding among independent hospitals nationwide. The medical center is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center and is a founding member of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. BIDMC is the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital is a 725-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners Healthcare System, an integrated health care delivery network. Internationally recognized as a leading academic health care institution, BWH is committed to excellence in patient care, medical research, and the training and education of health care professionals. The hospital’s preeminence in all aspects of clinical care is coupled with its strength in medical research. A leading recipient of research grants from the National Institutes of Health, BWH conducts internationally acclaimed clinical, basic, and epidemiological studies.

CONTACT: Bonnie Prescott, BIDMC 617-667-7306; bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
Amy Dayton, BWH, 617-534-1600

Bonnie Prescott | EurekAlert!
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.bidmc.harvard.edu/

Weitere Berichte zu: BIDMC BWH PhD TH1

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Medizin Gesundheit:

nachricht Neuer Ansatz gegen Gastritis
10.08.2017 | Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

nachricht Wenn Schimmelpilze das Auge zerstören
10.08.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Medizin Gesundheit >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Unterwasserroboter soll nach einem Jahr in der arktischen Tiefsee auftauchen

Am Dienstag, den 22. August wird das Forschungsschiff Polarstern im norwegischen Tromsø zu einer besonderen Expedition in die Arktis starten: Der autonome Unterwasserroboter TRAMPER soll nach einem Jahr Einsatzzeit am arktischen Tiefseeboden auftauchen. Dieses Gerät und weitere robotische Systeme, die Tiefsee- und Weltraumforscher im Rahmen der Helmholtz-Allianz ROBEX gemeinsam entwickelt haben, werden nun knapp drei Wochen lang unter Realbedingungen getestet. ROBEX hat das Ziel, neue Technologien für die Erkundung schwer erreichbarer Gebiete mit extremen Umweltbedingungen zu entwickeln.

„Auftauchen wird der TRAMPER“, sagt Dr. Frank Wenzhöfer vom Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI) selbstbewusst. Der...

Im Focus: Mit Barcodes der Zellentwicklung auf der Spur

Darüber, wie sich Blutzellen entwickeln, existieren verschiedene Auffassungen – sie basieren jedoch fast ausschließlich auf Experimenten, die lediglich Momentaufnahmen widerspiegeln. Wissenschaftler des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums stellen nun im Fachjournal Nature eine neue Technik vor, mit der sich das Geschehen dynamisch erfassen lässt: Mithilfe eines „Zufallsgenerators“ versehen sie Blutstammzellen mit genetischen Barcodes und können so verfolgen, welche Zelltypen aus der Stammzelle hervorgehen. Diese Technik erlaubt künftig völlig neue Einblicke in die Entwicklung unterschiedlicher Gewebe sowie in die Krebsentstehung.

Wie entsteht die Vielzahl verschiedener Zelltypen im Blut? Diese Frage beschäftigt Wissenschaftler schon lange. Nach der klassischen Vorstellung fächern sich...

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Forscher entwickeln maisförmigen Arzneimittel-Transporter zum Inhalieren

Er sieht aus wie ein Maiskolben, ist winzig wie ein Bakterium und kann einen Wirkstoff direkt in die Lungenzellen liefern: Das zylinderförmige Vehikel für Arzneistoffe, das Pharmazeuten der Universität des Saarlandes entwickelt haben, kann inhaliert werden. Professor Marc Schneider und sein Team machen sich dabei die körpereigene Abwehr zunutze: Makrophagen, die Fresszellen des Immunsystems, fressen den gesundheitlich unbedenklichen „Nano-Mais“ und setzen dabei den in ihm enthaltenen Wirkstoff frei. Bei ihrer Forschung arbeiteten die Pharmazeuten mit Forschern der Medizinischen Fakultät der Saar-Uni, des Leibniz-Instituts für Neue Materialien und der Universität Marburg zusammen Ihre Forschungsergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Healthcare Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700478

Ein Medikament wirkt nur, wenn es dort ankommt, wo es wirken soll. Wird ein Mittel inhaliert, muss der Wirkstoff in der Lunge zuerst die Hindernisse...

Im Focus: Exotische Quantenzustände: Physiker erzeugen erstmals optische „Töpfe" für ein Super-Photon

Physikern der Universität Bonn ist es gelungen, optische Mulden und komplexere Muster zu erzeugen, in die das Licht eines Bose-Einstein-Kondensates fließt. Die Herstellung solch sehr verlustarmer Strukturen für Licht ist eine Voraussetzung für komplexe Schaltkreise für Licht, beispielsweise für die Quanteninformationsverarbeitung einer neuen Computergeneration. Die Wissenschaftler stellen nun ihre Ergebnisse im Fachjournal „Nature Photonics“ vor.

Lichtteilchen (Photonen) kommen als winzige, unteilbare Portionen vor. Viele Tausend dieser Licht-Portionen lassen sich zu einem einzigen Super-Photon...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

European Conference on Eye Movements: Internationale Tagung an der Bergischen Universität Wuppertal

18.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Einblicke ins menschliche Denken

17.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Eröffnung der INC.worX-Erlebniswelt während der Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement-Tagung 2017

16.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Karte der Zellkraftwerke

18.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Chronische Infektionen aushebeln: Ein neuer Wirkstoff auf dem Weg in die Entwicklung

18.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Computer mit Köpfchen

18.08.2017 | Informationstechnologie