Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

A solution to sinusitis from the sea

19.02.2013
A team of scientists and surgeons from Newcastle are developing a new nasal spray from a marine microbe to help clear chronic sinusitis.

They are using an enzyme isolated from a marine bacterium Bacillus licheniformis found on the surface of seaweed which the scientists at Newcastle University were originally researching for the purpose of cleaning the hulls of ships.

Publishing in PLOS ONE, they describe how in many cases of chronic sinusitis the bacteria form a biofilm, a slimy protective barrier which can protect them from sprays or antibiotics. In vitro experiments showed that the enzyme, called NucB dispersed 58% of biofilms.

Dr Nicholas Jakubovics of Newcastle University said: "In effect, the enzyme breaks down the extracellular DNA, which is acting like a glue to hold the cells to the surface of the sinuses. In the lab, NucB cleared over half of the organisms we tested."

Sinusitis with or without polyps is one of the most common reasons people go to their GP and affects more than 10% of adults in the UK and Europe. Mr Mohamed Reda Elbadawey, Consultant of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Freeman Hospital – part of the Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – was prompted to contact the Newcastle University researchers after a student patient mentioned a lecture on the discovery of NucB and they are now working together to explore its medical potential.

Mr Elbadawey said: "Sinusitis is all too common and a huge burden on the NHS. For many people, symptoms include a blocked nose, nasal discharge or congestion, recurrent headaches, loss of the sense of smell and facial pain. While steroid nasal sprays and antibiotics can help some people, for the patients I see, they have not been effective and these patients have to undergo the stress of surgery. If we can develop an alternative we could benefit thousands of patients a year."

In the research, the team collected mucous and sinus biopsy samples from 20 different patients and isolated between two and six different species of bacteria from each individual. 24 different strains were investigated in the laboratory and all produced biofilms containing significant amounts of extracellular DNA. Biofilms formed by 14 strains were disrupted by treatment with the novel bacterial deoxyribonuclease, NucB.

When under threat, bacteria shield themselves in a slimy protective barrier. This slimy layer, known as a biofilm, is made up of bacteria held together by a web of extracellular DNA which adheres the bacteria to each other and to a solid surface – in this case in the lining of the sinuses. The biofilm protects the bacteria from attack by antibiotics and makes it very difficult to clear them from the sinuses.

In previous studies of the marine bacterium Bacillus licheniformis, Newcastle University scientists led by marine microbiologist Professor Grant Burgess found that when the bacteria want to move on, they release an enzyme which breaks down the external DNA, breaking up the biofilm and releasing the bacteria from the web. When the enzyme NucB was purified and added to other biofilms it quickly dissolved the slime exposing the bacterial cells, leaving them vulnerable.

The team's next step is to further test and develop the product and they are looking to set up collaboration with industry.

Karen Bidewell | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig von diesen teuren Medikamenten profitieren, wird intensiv an deren Verbesserung gearbeitet. Forschern um Prof. Thomas Valerius an der Christian Albrechts Universität Kiel gelang es nun, innovative Antikörper mit verbesserter Wirkung zu entwickeln.

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig...

Im Focus: Durchbruch mit einer Kette aus Goldatomen

Einem internationalen Physikerteam mit Konstanzer Beteiligung gelang im Bereich der Nanophysik ein entscheidender Durchbruch zum besseren Verständnis des Wärmetransportes

Einem internationalen Physikerteam mit Konstanzer Beteiligung gelang im Bereich der Nanophysik ein entscheidender Durchbruch zum besseren Verständnis des...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: Hoch wirksamer Malaria-Impfstoff erfolgreich getestet

Tübinger Wissenschaftler erreichen Impfschutz von bis zu 100 Prozent – Lebendimpfstoff unter kontrollierten Bedingungen eingesetzt

Tübinger Wissenschaftler erreichen Impfschutz von bis zu 100 Prozent – Lebendimpfstoff unter kontrollierten Bedingungen eingesetzt

Im Focus: Sensoren mit Adlerblick

Stuttgarter Forscher stellen extrem leistungsfähiges Linsensystem her

Adleraugen sind extrem scharf und sehen sowohl nach vorne, als auch zur Seite gut – Eigenschaften, die man auch beim autonomen Fahren gerne hätte. Physiker der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Die Welt der keramischen Werkstoffe - 4. März 2017

20.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Schwerstverletzungen verstehen und heilen

20.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

ANIM in Wien mit 1.330 Teilnehmern gestartet

17.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

20.02.2017 | Medizin Gesundheit

Multikristalline Siliciumsolarzelle mit 21,9 % Wirkungsgrad – Weltrekord zurück am Fraunhofer ISE

20.02.2017 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Wie Viren ihren Lebenszyklus mit begrenzten Mitteln effektiv sicherstellen

20.02.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie