Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Polymer Membranes with Molecular-sized Channels That Assemble Themselves

12.01.2011
Many futurists envision a world in which polymer membranes with molecular-sized channels are used to capture carbon, produce solar-based fuels, or desalinate sea water, among many other functions. This will require methods by which such membranes can be readily fabricated in bulk quantities. A technique representing a significant first step down that road has now been successfully demonstrated.

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley have developed a solution-based method for inducing the self-assembly of flexible polymer membranes with highly aligned subnanometer channels. Fully compatible with commercial membrane-fabrication processes, this new technique is believed to be the first example of organic nanotubes fabricated into a functional membrane over macroscopic distances.

“We’ve used nanotube-forming cyclic peptides and block co-polymers to demonstrate a directed co-assembly technique for fabricating subnanometer porous membranes over macroscopic distances,” says Ting Xu, a polymer scientist who led this project. “This technique should enable us to generate porous thin films in the future where the size and shape of the channels can be tailored by the molecular structure of the organic nanotubes.”

Ting Xu holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley's Departments of Materials Sciences and Engineering, and Chemistry. (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Public Affairs)

Xu, who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and the University of California Berkeley’s Departments of Materials Sciences and Engineering, and Chemistry, is the lead author of a paper describing this work, which has been published in the journal ACS Nano. The paper is titled “Subnanometer Porous Thin Films by the Co-assembly of Nanotube Subunits and Block Copolymers.”

Co-authoring the paper with Xu were Nana Zhao, Feng Ren, Rami Hourani, Ming Tsang Lee, Jessica Shu, Samuel Mao, and Brett Helms, who is with the Molecular Foundry, a DOE nanoscience center hosted at Berkeley Lab.

Channeled membranes are one of nature’s most clever and important inventions. Membranes perforated with subnanometer channels line the exterior and interior of a biological cell, controlling – by virtue of size – the transport of essential molecules and ions into, through, and out of the cell. This same approach holds enormous potential for a wide range of human technologies, but the challenge has been finding a cost-effective means of orienting vertically-aligned subnanometer channels over macroscopic distances on flexible substrates.

“Obtaining molecular level control over the pore size, shape, and surface chemistry of channels in polymer membranes has been investigated across many disciplines but has remained a critical bottleneck,” Xu says. “Composite films have been fabricated using pre-formed carbon nanotubes and the field is making rapid progess, however, it still presents a challenge to orient pre-formed nanotubes normal to the film surface over macroscopic distances.”

Schematic drawing depicts process by which a polymer is tethered to cyclic peptides (8CP)then blended with block copolymers (BCPs) to make a membrane permeated with subnanometer channels in the form of organic nanotubes.

For their subnanometer channels, Xu and her research group used the organic nanotubes naturally formed by cyclic peptides – polypeptide protein chains that connect at either end to make a circle. Unlike pre-formed carbon nanotubes, these organic nanotubes are “reversible,” which means their size and orientation can be easily modified during the fabrication process. For the membrane, Xu and her collaborators used block copolymers – long sequences or “blocks” of one type of monomer molecule bound to blocks of another type of monomer molecule. Just as cyclic peptides self-assemble into nanotubes, block copolymers self-assemble into well-defined arrays of nanostructures over macroscopic distances. A polymer covalently linked to the cyclic peptide was used as a “mediator” to bind together these two self-assembling systems

“The polymer conjugate is the key,” Xu says. “It controls the interface between the cyclic peptides and the block copolymers and synchronizes their self-assembly. The result is that nanotube channels only grow within the framework of the polymer membrane. When you can make everything work together this way, the process really becomes very simple.”

Xu and her colleagues were able to fabricate subnanometer porous membranes measuring several centimeters across and featuring high-density arrays of channels. The channels were tested via gas transport measurements of carbon dioxide and neopentane. These tests confirmed that permeance was higher for the smaller carbon dioxide molecules than for the larger molecules of neopentane. The next step will be to use this technique to make thicker membranes.

“Theoretically, there are no size limitations for our technique so there should be no problem in making membranes over large area,” Xu says. “We’re excited because we believe this demonstrates the feasibility of synchronizing multiple self-assembly processes by tailoring secondary interactions between individual components. Our work opens a new avenue to achieving hierarchical structures in a multicomponent system simultaneously, which in turn should help overcome the bottleneck to achieving functional materials using a bottom-up approach.”

This research was supported by DOE’s Office of Science and by the U.S. Army Research Office. Measurements were carried out on beamlines at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source and at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory managed by the University of California for the DOE Office of Science. Berkeley Lab provides solutions to the world’s most urgent scientific challenges including sustainable energy, climate change, human health, and a better understanding of matter and force in the universe. It is a world leader in improving our lives through team science, advanced computing, and innovative technology. Visit our at www.lbl.gov

Additional Information

For more information on the research of Ting Xu, visit her Website at http://www.mse.berkeley.edu/groups/xu/index.htm

A copy of the paper in ACS Nano paper “Subnanometer Porous Thin Films by the Co-assembly of Nanotube Subunits and Block Copolymers” is available at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn103083t

Lynn Yarris | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.lbl.gov

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer
20.10.2017 | Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

nachricht Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds
20.10.2017 | Lomonosov Moscow State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Hochfeldmagnet am BER II: Einblick in eine versteckte Ordnung

Seit dreißig Jahren gibt eine bestimmte Uranverbindung der Forschung Rätsel auf. Obwohl die Kristallstruktur einfach ist, versteht niemand, was beim Abkühlen unter eine bestimmte Temperatur genau passiert. Offenbar entsteht eine so genannte „versteckte Ordnung“, deren Natur völlig unklar ist. Nun haben Physiker erstmals diese versteckte Ordnung näher charakterisiert und auf mikroskopischer Skala untersucht. Dazu nutzten sie den Hochfeldmagneten am HZB, der Neutronenexperimente unter extrem hohen magnetischen Feldern ermöglicht.

Kristalle aus den Elementen Uran, Ruthenium, Rhodium und Silizium haben eine geometrisch einfache Struktur und sollten keine Geheimnisse mehr bergen. Doch das...

Im Focus: Schmetterlingsflügel inspiriert Photovoltaik: Absorption lässt sich um bis zu 200 Prozent steigern

Sonnenlicht, das von Solarzellen reflektiert wird, geht als ungenutzte Energie verloren. Die Flügel des Schmetterlings „Gewöhnliche Rose“ (Pachliopta aristolochiae) zeichnen sich durch Nanostrukturen aus, kleinste Löcher, die Licht über ein breites Spektrum deutlich besser absorbieren als glatte Oberflächen. Forschern am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ist es nun gelungen, diese Nanostrukturen auf Solarzellen zu übertragen und deren Licht-Absorptionsrate so um bis zu 200 Prozent zu steigern. Ihre Ergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler nun im Fachmagazin Science Advances. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700232

„Der von uns untersuchte Schmetterling hat eine augenscheinliche Besonderheit: Er ist extrem dunkelschwarz. Das liegt daran, dass er für eine optimale...

Im Focus: Schnelle individualisierte Therapiewahl durch Sortierung von Biomolekülen und Zellen mit Licht

Im Blut zirkulierende Biomoleküle und Zellen sind Träger diagnostischer Information, deren Analyse hochwirksame, individuelle Therapien ermöglichen. Um diese Information zu erschließen, haben Wissenschaftler des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Lasertechnik ILT ein Mikrochip-basiertes Diagnosegerät entwickelt: Der »AnaLighter« analysiert und sortiert klinisch relevante Biomoleküle und Zellen in einer Blutprobe mit Licht. Dadurch können Frühdiagnosen beispielsweise von Tumor- sowie Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen gestellt und patientenindividuelle Therapien eingeleitet werden. Experten des Fraunhofer ILT stellen diese Technologie vom 13.–16. November auf der COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf vor.

Der »AnaLighter« ist ein kompaktes Diagnosegerät zum Sortieren von Zellen und Biomolekülen. Sein technologischer Kern basiert auf einem optisch schaltbaren...

Im Focus: Neue Möglichkeiten für die Immuntherapie beim Lungenkrebs entdeckt

Eine gemeinsame Studie der Universität Bern und des Inselspitals Bern zeigt, dass spezielle Bindegewebszellen, die in normalen Blutgefässen die Wände abdichten, bei Lungenkrebs nicht mehr richtig funktionieren. Zusätzlich unterdrücken sie die immunologische Bekämpfung des Tumors. Die Resultate legen nahe, dass diese Zellen ein neues Ziel für die Immuntherapie gegen Lungenkarzinome sein könnten.

Lungenkarzinome sind die häufigste Krebsform weltweit. Jährlich werden 1.8 Millionen Neudiagnosen gestellt; und 2016 starben 1.6 Millionen Menschen an der...

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Das Immunsystem in Extremsituationen

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die jungen forschungsstarken Unis Europas tagen in Ulm - YERUN Tagung in Ulm

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Bauphysiktagung der TU Kaiserslautern befasst sich mit energieeffizienten Gebäuden

19.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Forscher finden Hinweise auf verknotete Chromosomen im Erbgut

20.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Saugmaschinen machen Waschwässer von Binnenschiffen sauberer

20.10.2017 | Ökologie Umwelt- Naturschutz

Strukturbiologieforschung in Berlin: DFG bewilligt Mittel für neue Hochleistungsmikroskope

20.10.2017 | Förderungen Preise