Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Methane-powered laptops may be closer than you think

24.11.2010
Materials scientists unveil tiny, low-temperature methane fuel cells
Making fuel cells practical and affordable will not happen overnight. It may, however, not take much longer.

With advances in nanostructured devices, lower operating temperatures, and the use of an abundant fuel source and cheaper materials, a group of researchers led by Shriram Ramanathan at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are increasingly optimistic about the commercial viability of the technology.

Ramanathan, an expert and innovator in the development of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), says they may, in fact, soon become the go-to technology for those on the go.

Electrochemical fuel cells have long been viewed as a potential eco-friendly alternative to fossil fuels—especially as most SOFCs leave behind little more than water as waste.

The obstacles to using SOFCs to charge laptops and phones or drive the next generation of cars and trucks have remained reliability, temperature, and cost.

Fuel cells operate by converting chemical energy (from hydrogen or a hydrocarbon fuel such as methane) into an electric current. Oxygen ions travel from the cathode through the electrolyte toward the anode, where they oxidize the fuel to produce a current of electrons back toward the cathode.

That may seem simple enough in principle, but until now, SOFCs have been more suited for the laboratory rather than the office or garage. In two studies appearing in the Journal of Power Sources this month, Ramanathan's team reported several critical advances in SOFC technology that may quicken their pace to market.

In the first paper, Ramanathan's group demonstrated stable and functional all-ceramic thin-film SOFCs that do not contain any platinum.

In thin-film SOFCs, the electrolyte is reduced to a hundredth or even a thousandth of its usual scale, using densely packed layers of special ceramic films, each just nanometers in thickness. These micro-SOFCs usually incorporate platinum electrodes, but they can be expensive and unreliable.

"If you use porous metal electrodes," explains Ramanathan, "they tend to be inherently unstable over long periods of time. They start to agglomerate and create open circuits in the fuel cells."

Ramanathan's platinum-free micro-SOFC eliminates this problem, resulting in a win-win: lower cost and higher reliability.

In a second paper published this month, the team demonstrated a methane-fueled micro-SOFC operating at less than 500° Celsius, a feat that is relatively rare in the field.

Traditional SOFCs have been operating at about 800�°C, but such high temperatures are only practical for stationary power generation. In short, using them to power up a smartphone mid-commute is not feasible.

In recent years, materials scientists have been working to reduce the required operating temperature to about 300�°C, a range Ramanathan calls the "sweet spot."

Moreover, when fuel cells operate at lower temperatures, material reliability is less critical—allowing, for example, the use of less expensive ceramics and metallic interconnects—and the start-up time can be shorter.

"Low temperature is a holy grail in this field," says Ramanathan. "If you can realize high-performance solid-oxide fuel cells that operate in the 300�°C range, you can use them in transportation vehicles and portable electronics, and with different types of fuels."

The use of methane, an abundant and cheap natural gas, in the team's SOFC was also of note. Until recently, hydrogen has been the primary fuel for SOFCs. Pure hydrogen, however, requires a greater amount of processing.

"It's expensive to make pure hydrogen," says Ramanathan, "and that severely limits the range of applications."

As methane begins to take over as the fuel of choice, the advances in temperature, reliability, and affordability should continue to reinforce each other.

"Future research at SEAS will explore new types of catalysts for methane SOFCs, with the goal of identifying affordable, earth-abundant materials that can help lower the operating temperature even further," adds Ramanathan.

Fuel cell research at SEAS is funded by the same NSF grant that enabled the "Robobees" project led by Robert J. Wood, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Wood and Ramanathan hope that micro-SOFCs will provide the tiny power source necessary to get the flying robots off the ground.

Ramanathan's co-authors on the papers were Bo Kuai Lai, a Research Associate at SEAS, and Ph.D. candidate Kian Kerman '14.

Caroline Perry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.harvard.edu

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected
21.02.2018 | North Carolina State University

nachricht Hidden talents: Converting heat into electricity with pencil and paper
20.02.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Innovation im Leichtbaubereich: Belastbares Sandwich aus Aramid und Carbon

Die Entwicklung von Leichtbaustrukturen ist eines der zentralen Zukunftsthemen unserer Gesellschaft. Besonders in der Luftfahrtindustrie und in anderen Transportbereichen sind Leichtbaustrukturen gefragt. Sie ermöglichen Energieeinsparungen und reduzieren den Ressourcenverbrauch bei Treibstoffen und Material. Zum Einsatz kommen dabei Verbundmaterialien in der so genannten Sandwich-Bauweise. Diese bestehen aus zwei dünnen, steifen und hochfesten Deckschichten mit einer dazwischen liegenden dicken, vergleichsweise leichten und weichen Mittelschicht, dem Sandwich-Kern.

Aramidpapier ist ein etabliertes Material für solche Sandwichkerne. Sein mechanisches Strukturversagen ist jedoch noch unzureichend erforscht: Bislang fehlten...

Im Focus: Die Brücke, die sich dehnen kann

Brücken verformen sich, daher baut man normalerweise Dehnfugen ein. An der TU Wien wurde eine Technik entwickelt, die ohne Fugen auskommt und dadurch viel Geld und Aufwand spart.

Wer im Auto mit flottem Tempo über eine Brücke fährt, spürt es sofort: Meist rumpelt man am Anfang und am Ende der Brücke über eine Dehnfuge, die dort...

Im Focus: Eine Frage der Dynamik

Die meisten Ionenkanäle lassen nur eine ganz bestimmte Sorte von Ionen passieren, zum Beispiel Natrium- oder Kaliumionen. Daneben gibt es jedoch eine Reihe von Kanälen, die für beide Ionensorten durchlässig sind. Wie den Eiweißmolekülen das gelingt, hat jetzt ein Team um die Wissenschaftlerin Han Sun (FMP) und die Arbeitsgruppe von Adam Lange (FMP) herausgefunden. Solche nicht-selektiven Kanäle besäßen anders als die selektiven eine dynamische Struktur ihres Selektivitätsfilters, berichten die FMP-Forscher im Fachblatt Nature Communications. Dieser Filter könne zwei unterschiedliche Formen ausbilden, die jeweils nur eine der beiden Ionensorten passieren lassen.

Ionenkanäle sind für den Organismus von herausragender Bedeutung. Wenn zum Beispiel Sinnesreize wahrgenommen, ans Gehirn weitergeleitet und dort verarbeitet...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Erste integrierte Schaltkreise (IC) aus Plastik

Erstmals ist es einem Forscherteam am Max-Planck-Institut (MPI) für Polymerforschung in Mainz gelungen, einen integrierten Schaltkreis (IC) aus einer monomolekularen Schicht eines Halbleiterpolymers herzustellen. Dies erfolgte in einem sogenannten Bottom-Up-Ansatz durch einen selbstanordnenden Aufbau.

In diesem selbstanordnenden Aufbauprozess ordnen sich die Halbleiterpolymere als geordnete monomolekulare Schicht in einem Transistor an. Transistoren sind...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2018

21.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Tag der Seltenen Erkrankungen – Deutsche Leberstiftung informiert über seltene Lebererkrankungen

21.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Digitalisierung auf dem Prüfstand: Hochkarätige Konferenz zu Empowerment in der agilen Arbeitswelt

20.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Kameratechnologie in Fahrzeugen: Bilddaten latenzarm komprimiert

21.02.2018 | Messenachrichten

Mit grüner Chemie gegen Malaria

21.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Periimplantitis: BMBF fördert zahnärztliches Verbund-Projekt mit 1,1 Millionen Euro

21.02.2018 | Förderungen Preise

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics