Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Bioinspired fibers change color when stretched

29.01.2013
Color-tunable photonic fibers mimic the fruit of the “bastard hogberry” plant
A team of materials scientists at Harvard University and the University of Exeter, UK, have invented a new fiber that changes color when stretched. Inspired by nature, the researchers identified and replicated the unique structural elements that create the bright iridescent blue color of a tropical plant’s fruit.

The multilayered fiber, described today in the journal Advanced Materials, could lend itself to the creation of smart fabrics that visibly react to heat or pressure.

“Our new fiber is based on a structure we found in nature, and through clever engineering we’ve taken its capabilities a step further,” says lead author Mathias Kolle, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). “The plant, of course, cannot change color. By combining its structure with an elastic material, however, we’ve created an artificial version that passes through a full rainbow of colors as it’s stretched.”
Since the evolution of the first eye on Earth more than 500 million years ago, the success of many organisms has relied upon the way they interact with light and color, making them useful models for the creation of new materials. For seeds and fruit in particular, bright color is thought to have evolved to attract the agents of seed dispersal, especially birds.

The fruit of the South American tropical plant, Margaritaria nobilis, commonly called “bastard hogberry,” is an intriguing example of this adaptation. The ultra-bright blue fruit, which is low in nutritious content, mimics a more fleshy and nutritious competitor. Deceived birds eat the fruit and ultimately release its seeds over a wide geographic area.

“The fruit of this bastard hogberry plant was scientifically delightful to pick,” says principal investigator Peter Vukusic, Associate Professor in Natural Photonics at the University of Exeter. “The light-manipulating architecture its surface layer presents, which has evolved to serve a specific biological function, has inspired an extremely useful and interesting technological design.”

Vukusic and his collaborators at Harvard studied the structural origin of the seed’s vibrant color. They discovered that the upper cells in the seed’s skin contain a curved, repeating pattern, which creates color through the interference of light waves. (A similar mechanism is responsible for the bright colors of soap bubbles.) The team’s analysis revealed that multiple layers of cells in the seed coat are each made up of a cylindrically layered architecture with high regularity on the nano- scale.

The team replicated the key structural elements of the fruit to create flexible, stretchable and color-changing photonic fibers using an innovative roll-up mechanism perfected in the Harvard laboratories.

“For our artificial structure, we cut down the complexity of the fruit to just its key elements,” explains Kolle. “We use very thin fibers and wrap a polymer bilayer around them. That gives us the refractive index contrast, the right number of layers, and the curved, cylindrical cross-section that we need to produce these vivid colors.”

The researchers say that the process could be scaled up and developed to suit industrial production.
“Our fiber-rolling technique allows the use of a wide range of materials, especially elastic ones, with the color-tuning range exceeding by an order of magnitude anything that has been reported for thermally drawn fibers,” says coauthor Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at Harvard SEAS, and Kolle’s adviser. Aizenberg is also Director of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard and a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.

The fibers’ superior mechanical properties, combined with their demonstrated color brilliance and tunability, make them very versatile. For instance, the fibers can be wound to coat complex shapes. Because the fibers change color under strain, the technology could lend itself to smart sports textiles that change color in areas of muscle tension, or that sense when an object is placed under strain as a result of heat.

Additional coauthors included Alfred Lethbridge at the University of Exeter, Moritz Kreysing at Ludwig Maximilians University (Germany), and Jeremy B. Baumberg, Professor of Nanophotonics at the University of Cambridge (UK).

This research was supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and through a postdoctoral research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The researchers also benefited from facilities at the Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems, which is part of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard also contributed to this research.

Caroline Perry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.seas.harvard.edu
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news-events/press-releases/bioinspired-fibers-change-color-when-stretched

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht The stacked colour sensor
16.11.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

nachricht Counterfeits and product piracy can be prevented by security features, such as printed 3-D microstructures
16.11.2017 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrakalte chemische Prozesse: Physikern gelingt beispiellose Vermessung auf Quantenniveau

Wissenschaftler um den Ulmer Physikprofessor Johannes Hecker Denschlag haben chemische Prozesse mit einer beispiellosen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau vermessen. Bei ihrer wissenschaftlichen Arbeit kombinierten die Forscher Theorie und Experiment und können so erstmals die Produktzustandsverteilung über alle Quantenzustände hinweg - unmittelbar nach der Molekülbildung - nachvollziehen. Die Forscher haben ihre Erkenntnisse in der renommierten Fachzeitschrift "Science" publiziert. Durch die Ergebnisse wird ein tieferes Verständnis zunehmend komplexer chemischer Reaktionen möglich, das zukünftig genutzt werden kann, um Reaktionsprozesse auf Quantenniveau zu steuern.

Einer deutsch-amerikanischen Forschergruppe ist es gelungen, chemische Prozesse mit einer nie dagewesenen Auflösung auf Quantenniveau zu vermessen. Dadurch...

Im Focus: Leoniden 2017: Sternschnuppen im Anflug?

Gemeinsame Pressemitteilung der Vereinigung der Sternfreunde und des Hauses der Astronomie in Heidelberg

Die Sternschnuppen der Leoniden sind in diesem Jahr gut zu beobachten, da kein Mondlicht stört. Experten sagen für die Nächte vom 16. auf den 17. und vom 17....

Im Focus: «Kosmische Schlange» lässt die Struktur von fernen Galaxien erkennen

Die Entstehung von Sternen in fernen Galaxien ist noch weitgehend unerforscht. Astronomen der Universität Genf konnten nun erstmals ein sechs Milliarden Lichtjahre entferntes Sternensystem genauer beobachten – und damit frühere Simulationen der Universität Zürich stützen. Ein spezieller Effekt ermöglicht mehrfach reflektierte Bilder, die sich wie eine Schlange durch den Kosmos ziehen.

Heute wissen Astronomen ziemlich genau, wie sich Sterne in der jüngsten kosmischen Vergangenheit gebildet haben. Aber gelten diese Gesetzmässigkeiten auch für...

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Pflanzenvielfalt von Wäldern aus der Luft abbilden

Produktivität und Stabilität von Waldökosystemen hängen stark von der funktionalen Vielfalt der Pflanzengemeinschaften ab. UZH-Forschenden gelang es, die Pflanzenvielfalt von Wäldern durch Fernerkundung mit Flugzeugen in verschiedenen Massstäben zu messen und zu kartieren – von einzelnen Bäumen bis hin zu ganzen Artengemeinschaften. Die neue Methode ebnet den Weg, um zukünftig die globale Pflanzendiversität aus der Luft und aus dem All zu überwachen.

Ökologische Studien zeigen, dass die Pflanzenvielfalt zentral ist für das Funktionieren von Ökosys-temen. Wälder mit einer höheren funktionalen Vielfalt –...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Technologievorsprung durch Textiltechnik

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Roboter für ein gesundes Altern: „European Robotics Week 2017“ an der Frankfurt UAS

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Börse für Zukunftstechnologien – Leichtbautag Stade bringt Unternehmen branchenübergreifend zusammen

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Technologievorsprung durch Textiltechnik

17.11.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

IHP präsentiert sich auf der productronica 2017

17.11.2017 | Messenachrichten

Roboter schafft den Salto rückwärts

17.11.2017 | Innovative Produkte