Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

MIT sleuths discover quick way to new materials

29.11.2005


In work that could radically change how engineers search for new materials, MIT researchers have developed a way to test the mechanical properties of almost 600 different materials in a matter of days - a task that would have taken weeks using conventional techniques.



The new process could lead to the faster identification of dental implants that don’t crack, tank armor that’s more resistant to missiles, and other materials dependent on mechanical properties like stiffness and toughness.

... mehr zu:
»Department »Engineering »Vliet


The trick? The team, led by Assistant Professor Krystyn J. Van Vliet of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, miniaturized the process.

Van Vliet, MSE graduate student Catherine A. Tweedie, research associate Daniel G. Anderson of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute Professor Robert Langer describe the work in the cover story of the November issue of Advanced Materials.

In 2004 Anderson, Langer and a colleague reported using robotic technology to deposit more than 1,700 spots of biomaterial (roughly 500 different materials in triplicate) on a glass slide measuring only 25 millimeters wide by 75 millimeters long. Twenty such slides, or microarrays, could be made in a single day.

The arrays were then used to determine which materials were most conducive to the growth and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. (See web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/celltest.html.)

Enter Van Vliet, whose lab studies how the mechanical properties of a surface affect cells growing on that surface. Curious as to whether the Langer team had probed the mechanical properties of the biomaterials, she contacted Langer, who introduced her to Anderson.

And what began as an isolated question turned into a collaboration with wider implications.

Together the researchers showed that the mechanical properties of each biomaterial could indeed be determined - and quickly - by combining the arrays with nanoindentation, a technique key to Van Vliet’s work.

In nanoindentation a hard, small probe is pressed into a more compliant material, to depths many times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. By measuring the force applied and how deeply the probe penetrates the material, scientists can learn a great deal about the material’s mechanical properties.

"The spots of material Dan was making had diameters about three times that of a human hair, a scale perfect for nanoindenation," Van Vliet said. So the team created new arrays of roughly 600 unique polymers. "Each dot was a combination of two different monomers, or building blocks, so we could map out the effects of the percentage of each monomer on the properties of the material," Van Vliet said. And in 24 hours Tweedie, using the nanoindenter, had that data in hand.

It would have taken many weeks to analyze that many materials using traditional techniques, which involve "the serial process of bulk-material synthesis, batch-sample preparation, and individual-sample testing," the team writes in Advanced Materials. Further, Anderson explained, many materials have been discovered when a scientist thinks about what the perfect properties of a material should be, and then invents it. "But that can take lots of time," he said.

Enter combinatorial libraries. "Instead of trying to engineer perfect materials, let’s make thousands at the smallest scale we can, and see if we can find some materials with unexpected or interesting properties," Anderson said.

Tweedie notes that even in this first "proof of principle" experiment there were some surprises. For example, she said, "the stiffness of certain polymers depended more on the combination of monomers used (how much of A and B) rather than the structure of each monomer, with certain combinations resulting in very compliant polymers. These were very large, unanticipated changes in mechanical properties that could then be optimized further in a subset of combinations."

Describing the collaboration that brought about these results, Van Vliet concluded: "It’s really made both [of our groups] think in different ways about what we’re doing."

Elizabeth Thomson | Massachusetts Institute of Techn
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.mit.edu

Weitere Berichte zu: Department Engineering Vliet

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Materialwissenschaften:

nachricht Fraunhofer IMWS entwickelt biobasierte Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunde für Leichtbau-Anwendungen
23.04.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Mikrostruktur von Werkstoffen und Systemen IMWS

nachricht Ein Wimpernschlag vom Isolator zum Metall
17.04.2018 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Materialwissenschaften >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Why we need erasable MRI scans

New technology could allow an MRI contrast agent to 'blink off,' helping doctors diagnose disease

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE und teamtechnik bringen leitfähiges Kleben für Siliciumsolarzellen zu Industriereife

Das Kleben der Zellverbinder von Hocheffizienz-Solarzellen im industriellen Maßstab ist laut dem Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE und dem Anlagenhersteller teamtechnik marktreif. Als Ergebnis des gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekts »KleVer« ist die Klebetechnologie inzwischen so weit ausgereift, dass sie als alternative Verschaltungstechnologie zum weit verbreiteten Weichlöten angewendet werden kann. Durch die im Vergleich zum Löten wesentlich niedrigeren Prozesstemperaturen können vor allem temperatursensitive Hocheffizienzzellen schonend und materialsparend verschaltet werden.

Dabei ist der Durchsatz in der industriellen Produktion nur geringfügig niedriger als beim Verlöten der Zellen. Die Zuverlässigkeit der Klebeverbindung wurde...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: Innovatives 3D-Druckverfahren für die Raumfahrt

Auf der Hannover Messe 2018 präsentiert die Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), wie Astronauten in Zukunft Werkzeug oder Ersatzteile per 3D-Druck in der Schwerelosigkeit selbst herstellen können. So können Gewicht und damit auch Transportkosten für Weltraummissionen deutlich reduziert werden. Besucherinnen und Besucher können das innovative additive Fertigungsverfahren auf der Messe live erleben.

Pulverbasierte additive Fertigung unter Schwerelosigkeit heißt das Projekt, bei dem ein Bauteil durch Aufbringen von Pulverschichten und selektivem...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: IWS-Ingenieure formen moderne Alu-Bauteile für zukünftige Flugzeuge

Mit Unterdruck zum Leichtbau-Flugzeug

Ingenieure des Fraunhofer-Instituts für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS) in Dresden haben in Kooperation mit Industriepartnern ein innovatives Verfahren...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Konferenz »Encoding Cultures. Leben mit intelligenten Maschinen« | 27. & 28.04.2018 ZKM | Karlsruhe

26.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Konferenz zur Marktentwicklung von Gigabitnetzen in Deutschland

26.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

infernum-Tag 2018: Digitalisierung und Nachhaltigkeit

24.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Weltrekord an der Uni Paderborn: Optische Datenübertragung mit 128 Gigabits pro Sekunde

26.04.2018 | Informationstechnologie

Multifunktionaler Mikroschwimmer transportiert Fracht und zerstört sich selbst

26.04.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Berner Mars-Kamera liefert erste farbige Bilder vom Mars

26.04.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics