Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Switchable adhesion principle enables damage-free handling of sensitive devices even in vacuum

19.01.2015

The researchers from the INM will be presenting their new Gecomer® technology at the International Nanotechnology Exhibition and Conference nano tech 2015, Tokyo, Japan.

Components with highly sensitive surfaces are used in automotive, semiconductor and display technologies as well as for complex optical lens systems. During the production process, these parts are transferred in between many process steps.


Switchable adhesion principle enables damage-free handling of sensitive devices.

Copyright: Uwe Bellhäuser, only free within this information

Each pick-up and release with conventional gripping systems involves the risk of either contamination of the surfaces with residues from transportation adhesives, or damaging due to mechanical gripping. Suction cup systems diminish residues, but fail in a vacuum or on rough surfaces.

Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for New Materials (INM) enhanced the Gecko adhesion principle such that adhesion can be switched on and off in vacuum.

"Artificially produced microscopic pillars, so-called gecko structures, adhere to various items. By manipulating these pillars, the adhesion can be switched off. Thus, items can be lifted and quickly released," explains Karsten Moh from the Program Division Functional Microstructures. "This technique is particularly interesting in vacuum, as suction cups fail here," says Moh.

Parts can, for example, be handled in a deposition chamber. With the currently developed adhesion system, objects with smooth surfaces can be lifted and released, having a weight of approximately 100 grams per square centimeter (ca.1.4 lbs per square inch)." In our test runs, the system has proved successful even after 100,000 runs", says the upscaling expert Moh.

The development group is now working on the gripping of objects with rough or curved surfaces without leaving residues. "Then, we could also move glass lenses without damaging them in the production process," says Moh. Therefore the investigators focus their work on testing the influence of different triggers like light, magnetic field, electric field or changes in temperature.

From January 28 to 30, the researchers of the INM will present this and further results at the German Pavilion, Booth 5J-21. At the German Pavilion, the Association of German Engineers (VDI) will concentrate the expertise of all German exhibitors at the nano tech Exhibition. The German Pavilion is supported by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).

An oral presentation on „Materials and Processing for functionalized Surfaces“. will take place at the Main Theater, Hall 5, on January 29, German Day.

Your contacts at the Booth:
Dr. Karsten Moh
Dr. Thomas Müller
Mareike Frensemeier

Your expert at the INM:
Prof. Eduard Arzt
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Functional Microstructures
Phone: +49681-9300-500
eduard.arzt@inm-gmbh.de

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological applications and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbruecken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 195 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.inm-gmbh.de/en
http://www.nanotech-tokyo.german-pavilion.com/content/en/home/home.php

Dr. Carola Jung | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Maschinenbau:

nachricht Flüssiger Wasserstoff im freien Fall
05.12.2016 | Zentrum für angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation (ZARM)

nachricht IPH entwickelt Prüfstand für angetriebene Tragrollen
29.11.2016 | IPH - Institut für Integrierte Produktion Hannover gGmbH

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Maschinenbau >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Poröse kristalline Materialien: TU Graz-Forscher zeigt Methode zum gezielten Wachstum

Mikroporöse Kristalle (MOFs) bergen große Potentiale für die funktionalen Materialien der Zukunft. Paolo Falcaro von der TU Graz et al zeigen in Nature Materials, wie man MOFs gezielt im großen Maßstab wachsen lässt.

„Metal-organic frameworks“ (MOFs) genannte poröse Kristalle bestehen aus metallischen Knotenpunkten mit organischen Molekülen als Verbindungselemente. Dank...

Im Focus: Gravitationswellen als Sensor für Dunkle Materie

Die mit der Entdeckung von Gravitationswellen entstandene neue Disziplin der Gravitationswellen-Astronomie bekommt eine weitere Aufgabe: die Suche nach Dunkler Materie. Diese könnte aus einem Bose-Einstein-Kondensat sehr leichter Teilchen bestehen. Wie Rechnungen zeigen, würden Gravitationswellen gebremst, wenn sie durch derartige Dunkle Materie laufen. Dies führt zu einer Verspätung von Gravitationswellen relativ zu Licht, die bereits mit den heutigen Detektoren messbar sein sollte.

Im Universum muss es gut fünfmal mehr unsichtbare als sichtbare Materie geben. Woraus diese Dunkle Materie besteht, ist immer noch unbekannt. Die...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Wie sich Zellen gegen Salmonellen verteidigen

Bioinformatiker der Goethe-Universität haben das erste mathematische Modell für einen zentralen Verteidigungsmechanismus der Zelle gegen das Bakterium Salmonella entwickelt. Sie können ihren experimentell arbeitenden Kollegen damit wertvolle Anregungen zur Aufklärung der beteiligten Signalwege geben.

Jedes Jahr sind Salmonellen weltweit für Millionen von Infektionen und tausende Todesfälle verantwortlich. Die Körperzellen können sich aber gegen die...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

NRW Nano-Konferenz in Münster

07.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Wie aus reinen Daten ein verständliches Bild entsteht

05.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Von „Coopetition“ bis „Digitale Union“ – Die Fertigungsindustrien im digitalen Wandel

02.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Das Universum enthält weniger Materie als gedacht

07.12.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Partnerschaft auf Abstand: tiefgekühlte Helium-Moleküle

07.12.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Bakterien aus dem Blut «ziehen»

07.12.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie