Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New sensor cable enables remote monitoring of miles of perimeter fen

27.03.2013
Airports, nuclear power stations, industrial and research sites, or even your own garden – there are many places that need to be protected against unauthorized access, and often protection is required 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Up until now, the sheer length of the perimeter to be protected and the high costs involved made this sort of protection impossible at many sites. Working in collaboration with a number of companies, research scientists at Saarland University have developed a new type of surveillance technology that enables extended perimeters to be monitored and protected at low cost.


Scientists from Saarland University have developed a special sensor technique to keep safety fence under surveillance. Foto: GBA-Panek GmbH

The new technology is based on magnetometers (magnetic field sensors) that can be incorporated within smart cables of essentially any length. These cables can themselves be installed into fencing or roadways.

The research team is presenting its innovative technology at the major international technology fair Hannover Messe from April 8th to April 12th (Stand C 40, Hall 2 ‒ Saarland Research and Innovation Stand).

If an intruder wants to gain access to a secure industrial site, he first has to overcome some sort of physical barrier, typically a fence. If he climbs the fence or cuts the links he will, unavoidably, cause a vibrational disturbance, which will disclose his position to the novel detection system that has been developed by Uwe Hartmann, Professor for Experimental Physics at Saarland University, and research assistant Haibin Gao. No matter how small the disturbance, each movement of the fence influences the Earth's magnetic field and these changes are detected by the system's tiny, highly sensitive magnetometers.

The magnetometer probes are arranged within the cable like beads on a necklace and the cable is incorporated either permanently or temporarily into the fence. The cable can also be buried in the ground, in which case it responds to any changes in the magnetic field above it. The tiny probes form part of a bus communication network and immediately report any physical disturbance or change including information on where the vibration occurred and whether or not the change in the magnetic field was caused by a human intruder.
The researchers need to be able to exclude false alarms triggered by wind, animals or some other harmless cause. This they do by using complex algorithms to analyse the signals generated by the individual sensors. These algorithms are currently being developed and refined in order to unambiguously distinguish natural disturbances from the disturbances caused by a human intruder.

“The smart sensor cable does not require any major conversion work to be carried out before it can be used, and makes barbed wire and camera surveillance superfluous,” says Professor Hartmann. “The system does not record any personal data. The sensors report only the information that is needed for protecting property or for monitoring, say, rail traffic: Has a disturbance occurred? If it has, where did it occur and was it caused by human interference? No other information about the person is recorded,” explains Hartmann.

The prototype of the “Vibromag Cable” that Uwe Hartmann and his team developed in conjunction with St. Ingbert-based company Votronic Technology GmbH is now to be developed to production standard. This is the objective of a new project starting in August 2013 in which the Saarbrücken physicists will be teaming up with three partner companies, each of which became aware of the new technology at the 2012 Hannover Messe. The three companies are: Sensitec GmbH, based in Mainz and Lahnau (www.sensitec.com), Listec GmbH from Isen (www.listec-gmbh.com), and GBA-Panek GmbH whose headquarters are in Kahla, south of Jena (www.gba-panek.de).

The Saarland Research and Innovation stand at Hannover Messe is organized by Saarland University's Contact Centre for Technology Transfer (KWT).

For further information, please contact:
Prof. Dr. Uwe Hartmann, Nanostructure Research and Nanotechnology Group,
Department of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, Germany
Tel.: +49 (0)681 302-3799 or -3798; E-mail: u.hartmann@mx.uni-saarland.de
Press photographs are available at www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos and can be used at no charge. Please read and comply with the conditions of use.

Note for radio journalists: Studio-quality telephone interviews can be conducted with researchers at Saarland University using broadcast audio IP codec technology (IP direct dial or via the ARD node 106813020001). Interview requests should be addressed to the university’s Press and Public Relations Office (+49 (0)681 302-3610).

Melanie Löw | Universität des Saarlandes
Further information:
http://www.uni-saarland.de

More articles from HANNOVER MESSE:

nachricht Measurement of components in 3D under water
01.04.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF

nachricht Artificial hand able to respond sensitively thanks to muscles made from smart metal wires
24.03.2015 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from HANNOVER MESSE >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Vollmond-Dreierlei am 31. Januar 2018

Am 31. Januar 2018 fallen zum ersten Mal seit dem 30. Dezember 1982 "Supermond" (ein Vollmond in Erdnähe), "Blutmond" (eine totale Mondfinsternis) und "Blue Moon" (ein zweiter Vollmond im Kalendermonat) zusammen - Beobachter im deutschen Sprachraum verpassen allerdings die sichtbaren Phasen der Mondfinsternis.

Nach den letzten drei Vollmonden am 4. November 2017, 3. Dezember 2017 und 2. Januar 2018 ist auch der bevorstehende Vollmond am 31. Januar 2018 ein...

Im Focus: Maschinelles Lernen im Quantenlabor

Auf dem Weg zum intelligenten Labor präsentieren Physiker der Universitäten Innsbruck und Wien ein lernfähiges Programm, das eigenständig Quantenexperimente entwirft. In ersten Versuchen hat das System selbständig experimentelle Techniken (wieder)entdeckt, die heute in modernen quantenoptischen Labors Standard sind. Dies zeigt, dass Maschinen in Zukunft auch eine kreativ unterstützende Rolle in der Forschung einnehmen könnten.

In unseren Taschen stecken Smartphones, auf den Straßen fahren intelligente Autos, Experimente im Forschungslabor aber werden immer noch ausschließlich von...

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Fliegen wird smarter – Kommunikationssystem LYRA im Lufthansa FlyingLab

• Prototypen-Test im Lufthansa FlyingLab
• LYRA Connect ist eine von drei ausgewählten Innovationen
• Bessere Kommunikation zwischen Kabinencrew und Passagieren

Die Zukunft des Fliegens beginnt jetzt: Mehrere Monate haben die Finalisten des Mode- und Technologiewettbewerbs „Telekom Fashion Fusion & Lufthansa FlyingLab“...

Im Focus: Ein Atom dünn: Physiker messen erstmals mechanische Eigenschaften zweidimensionaler Materialien

Die dünnsten heute herstellbaren Materialien haben eine Dicke von einem Atom. Sie zeigen völlig neue Eigenschaften und sind zweidimensional – bisher bekannte Materialien sind dreidimensional aufgebaut. Um sie herstellen und handhaben zu können, liegen sie bislang als Film auf dreidimensionalen Materialien auf. Erstmals ist es Physikern der Universität des Saarlandes um Uwe Hartmann jetzt mit Forschern vom Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gelungen, die mechanischen Eigenschaften von freitragenden Membranen atomar dünner Materialien zu charakterisieren. Die Messungen erfolgten mit dem Rastertunnelmikroskop an Graphen. Ihre Ergebnisse veröffentlichen die Forscher im Fachmagazin Nanoscale.

Zweidimensionale Materialien sind erst seit wenigen Jahren bekannt. Die Wissenschaftler André Geim und Konstantin Novoselov erhielten im Jahr 2010 den...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Veranstaltungen

15. BF21-Jahrestagung „Mobilität & Kfz-Versicherung im Fokus“

22.01.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Transferkonferenz Digitalisierung und Innovation

22.01.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Kongress Meditation und Wissenschaft

19.01.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

15. BF21-Jahrestagung „Mobilität & Kfz-Versicherung im Fokus“

22.01.2018 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Forschungsteam schafft neue Möglichkeiten für Medizin und Materialwissenschaft

22.01.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Ein Haus mit zwei Gesichtern

22.01.2018 | Architektur Bauwesen

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics