Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Hannover Messe: TCO inks allow direct printing of transparent conductor structures on film

31.03.2014

Transparent conducting oxides (TCO) are widely used as transparent electrodes or IR-reflective materials.

TCOs are normally produced using vacuum coating such as sputtering. At the INM, special TCO inks have been developed for the wet-chemical application of TCO layers to both solid and flexible substrates, such as plastic film.


TCO inks allow direct printing of transparent conductor structures on film.

Copyright: Uwe Bellhäuser, only free within this press release.

To do this, developers at the INM use TCO inks containing TCO nanoparticles and produced using wet chemistry processes. This method enables not only application to plastics and films but also, for the first time, direct printing of transparent conductor structures.

From 7 to 11 April 2014, the researchers of the INM will be presenting this and further results in Hall 2 at the stand C48 of the Hannover Messe in the context of the leading trade fair for R&D and Technology Transfer.

“We produce special nanoparticles from the transparent conducting oxides”, explains Peter William de Oliveira, Head of the Optical Materials Program Division. “By adding a solvent and a special binder, these modified TCO nanoparticles can be applied to the film directly by gravure printing as an “ink” using a printing plate”, he adds.

This process has a number of advantages. Gravure printing enables TCO layers to be printed cost-effectively in just one process step. As a result of UV curing at temperatures below 150°C, it is also possible to coat thin plastic films.

The binder fulfills a number of tasks here. It produces good adhesion of the TCO nanoparticles to the substrate and also increases the flexibility of the TCO layers. This means that the conductivity remains the same, even if the films become distorted - a clear advantage over current high-vacuum techniques such as sputtering.

“There is still potential here for further development”, explains physicist de Oliveira. “If we succeed in also making the binder conductive, conductivity as a whole will increase and the surface resistance will be further reduced.”

Coating on flexible film substrates is possible using the classic roll-to-roll process. Initial experiments on this at the INM are promising, and researchers are agreed that the use of structured rolls in future will mean that large, structured, conductive surfaces can also be printed cost-effectively and with a high output.

In addition to using TCO nanoparticles, developers at the INM are also working with the wet chemistry sol-gel process which is particularly suitable for temperature-stable substrates such as glass or ceramic. In this process, curing takes place at temperatures above 450°C. In addition to large-area substrates, more complex geometries such as pipes and moldings can also be coated.

“Here again, the advantage lies in the costs”, says the Head of the Program Division. With vacuum coating processes such as the sputter method, expensive high-vacuum apparatus and large TCO targets are needed for coating large areas; there is also the limited possibility of evenly coating curved substrates using this technique.

At the INM, too, the material of choice is predominantly indium tin oxide (ITO). Because of dwindling resources and the high price of the raw material indium, researchers at the INM are also increasingly testing alternative transparent oxides such as aluminum zinc oxide (AZO).

Contact:
Dr. Peter William de Oliveira
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Programme Division Optical Materials
Phone: +49681-9300-148
peter.oliveira@inm-gmbh.de

Your contact at the stand:
Dr. Thomas Müller
Dr. Michael Opsölder

The INM will also present its competence within various talks in Hall 2 at the Tech transfer stand.
* „Nanotechnology at the INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4. 2014, 10:15 - 10:30 a.m.
* „Nanotechnology in the Leibniz Network Nano“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4.2014, 12:00 - 12:15 p.m.
* „Nanoparticles for Optics and Electronics“, Dr. Peter William de Oliveira, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:00 - 11:10 a.m.
* „Nanomers - Highly structured integrated functional coatings for practical solutions in industrial applications“, Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:20 - 11:35 a.m.

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological applications and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbruecken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 195 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.inm-gmbh.de/en

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: INM Leibniz-Institut TCO Technology advantage indium nanoparticles plastic structures surfaces vacuum

More articles from HANNOVER MESSE:

nachricht Measurement of components in 3D under water
01.04.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF

nachricht Artificial hand able to respond sensitively thanks to muscles made from smart metal wires
24.03.2015 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from HANNOVER MESSE >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

An Bord einer Höhenforschungsrakete wurde erstmals im Weltraum eine Wolke ultrakalter Atome erzeugt. Damit gelang der MAIUS-Mission der Nachweis, dass quantenoptische Sensoren auch in rauen Umgebungen wie dem Weltraum eingesetzt werden können – eine Voraussetzung, um fundamentale Fragen der Wissenschaft beantworten zu können und ein Innovationstreiber für alltägliche Anwendungen.

Gemäß dem Einstein’schen Äquivalenzprinzip werden alle Körper, unabhängig von ihren sonstigen Eigenschaften, gleich stark durch die Gravitationskraft...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Mikrobe des Jahres 2017: Halobacterium salinarum - einzellige Urform des Sehens

Am 24. Januar 1917 stach Heinrich Klebahn mit einer Nadel in den verfärbten Belag eines gesalzenen Seefischs, übertrug ihn auf festen Nährboden – und entdeckte einige Wochen später rote Kolonien eines "Salzbakteriums". Heute heißt es Halobacterium salinarum und ist genau 100 Jahre später Mikrobe des Jahres 2017, gekürt von der Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie (VAAM). Halobacterium salinarum zählt zu den Archaeen, dem Reich von Mikroben, die zwar Bakterien ähneln, aber tatsächlich enger verwandt mit Pflanzen und Tieren sind.

Rot und salzig
Archaeen sind häufig an außergewöhnliche Lebensräume angepasst, beispielsweise heiße Quellen, extrem saure Gewässer oder – wie H. salinarum – an...

Im Focus: Innovatives Hochleistungsmaterial: Biofasern aus Florfliegenseide

Neuartige Biofasern aus einem Seidenprotein der Florfliege werden am Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung IAP gemeinsam mit der Firma AMSilk GmbH entwickelt. Die Forscher arbeiten daran, das Protein in großen Mengen biotechnologisch herzustellen. Als hochgradig biegesteife Faser soll das Material künftig zum Beispiel in Leichtbaukunststoffen für die Verkehrstechnik eingesetzt werden. Im Bereich Medizintechnik sind beispielsweise biokompatible Seidenbeschichtungen von Implantaten denkbar. Ein erstes Materialmuster präsentiert das Fraunhofer IAP auf der Internationalen Grünen Woche in Berlin vom 20.1. bis 29.1.2017 in Halle 4.2 am Stand 212.

Zum Schutz des Nachwuchses vor bodennahen Fressfeinden lagern Florfliegen ihre Eier auf der Unterseite von Blättern ab – auf der Spitze von stabilen seidenen...

Im Focus: Verkehrsstau im Nichts

Konstanzer Physiker verbuchen neue Erfolge bei der Vermessung des Quanten-Vakuums

An der Universität Konstanz ist ein weiterer bedeutender Schritt hin zu einem völlig neuen experimentellen Zugang zur Quantenphysik gelungen. Das Team um Prof....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Hybride Eisschutzsysteme – Lösungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Luftfahrt

23.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Mittelstand 4.0 – Mehrwerte durch Digitalisierung: Hintergründe, Beispiele, Lösungen

20.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Nachhaltige Wassernutzung in der Landwirtschaft Osteuropas und Zentralasiens

19.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Wie der Nordatlantik zum Wärmepirat wurde

23.01.2017 | Geowissenschaften

Immunabwehr ohne Kollateralschaden

23.01.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physik Astronomie