Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Hannover Messe: Predicting oil changes in industrial applications without interrupting operations

27.03.2014

Predictive maintenance of hard-to-access plants, no unnecessary oil changes, no unnecessary laboratory costs and less environmental impact.

These are just some of the benefits offered by a new system that can monitor the condition of lubricating oils, hydraulic oils and other fluids in industrial installations without interrupting ongoing operations.


Professor Andreas Schütze (left) and graduate engineer Eliseo Pignanelli (right) will be exhibiting the portable version of their measurement system at HANNOVER MESSE.

Photo credit: Oliver Dietze

The method was developed by engineers from Saarbrücken in collaboration with project partners. The compact sensor system is available as a portable unit or can be built into industrial plants, wind turbines and other machinery.

The system, which uses optical methods to measure the oil’s chemical makeup and the degree of particle loading, can also predict the best time for an oil change. The team of engineers led by Professor Andreas Schütze from Saarland University and ZeMA, the Centre for Mechatronics and Automation Technology in Saarbrücken, will be showcasing their work from April 7th to April 11th at the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand at HANNOVER MESSE (Hall 2, Stand C 48).

... more about:
»IP »Innovation »KWT »Technology »damage »measurement

Failing to change the oil at the right time can cause serious damage to machinery and equipment. A fact that is just as true for cars as it is for large industrial installations. Over time, a lubricating oil used to minimize friction, reduce wear and prevent overheating will become contaminated with fine metal dust and particles from abrasive processes.

The oil will also gradually oxidize. And the additives that help to optimize the oil’s properties also have only a finite lifetime. At some point, the oil will no longer be able to act as an effective lubricant. According to Professor Andreas Schütze, the key problem is that it is not obvious when exactly the oil needs changing. In the case of plants or installations that are difficult to reach – such as offshore wind turbines – the method adopted up to now has been either to take oil samples and have them examined in costly laboratory analyses or to simply change the oil at some regular interval.

“As a result, a great deal of effort is expended in changing oil that is still actually useable, which is costly for both the operator and the environment,” explains Professor Schütze.

In collaboration with partners from other universities and industry, Schütze’s team at the Lab for Measurement Technology and at ZeMA have developed a measurement system that can be integrated directly into industrial installations where it continuously measures and monitors oil ageing and degradation while the installation continues to operate. The data from the measurement system are currently transmitted by mobile radio communication so that analysis and assessment can be performed off-site.

A portable version of the system also exists. At HANNOVER MESSE, the engineers will be exhibiting a small case that contains all the equipment needed (from the measuring cell to the display unit) for on-site testing of the oil’s quality. “Our system allows us to identify and avert potential damage early on. We can predict when maintenance work will be needed and plant operators can plan accordingly,” explains Schütze. The method is also suitable for use with hydraulic systems. And the measurement system can test not only oils, but can also be used to monitor the condition of other fluids.

The methods developed by the engineers in Saarbrücken involve shining light into the liquid being monitored. In one case, light from a laser diode is scattered by any particles present in the oil or fluid. “Each different type of particle scatters the light in a particular way, causing more or less light to be measured in the various spatial directions. The scattered light is then recorded by photodiodes and the signals analysed.

The system allows us to distinguish between metal dust, other solid particles and air bubbles and to determine the concentration of each,” explains engineer Eliseo Pignanelli, who has been involved in refining the system. The second optical technique measures the absorption of infrared light by the fluid at specific wavelengths as it flows through the measurement system.

“This permits us to draw conclusions about the chemical state of the oil, because chemical changes to the oil will cause changes in the light spectrum that we record,” says Pignanelli. This spectroscopic analysis also enables the presence of water in the oil to be detected.

The team of engineers at Saarbrücken have been developing the system in a number of research projects, including the “FluidSens” and “NaMiFlu” projects that are collaborative efforts involving partners from academic institutions and from industry. Industrial partners include HYDAC Electronic GmbH in Gersweiler and EADS Deutschland GmbH (Innovation Works).

One of the main areas of research concerned optimizing the optical and mechanical properties of the nanostructured layers used in the microsensors and adapting them for use at high pressures. Working with ZeMA in Saarbrücken, the technology is now being developed into a market-ready product.

The research work has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the Saarland Ministry of Economics and Science and the European Regional Development Fund.

A press photograph is available at http://www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos and can be used at no charge.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Andreas Schütze, Tel.: +49 (0)681 302-4663, E-mail: schuetze@lmt.uni-saarland.de
Dipl.-Ing. Eliseo Pignanelli: Tel.: +49 (0)681 85 787 44, E-mail: e.pignanelli@lmt.uni-saarland.de
http://www.lmt.uni-saarland.de
From April 7–11, the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand (Hall 2, Stand C 48) at HANNOVER MESSE can be reached by calling +49 (0)681 302-68500 or +49 (0)162 2137298.

Note for radio journalists: Studio-quality telephone interviews can be conducted using broadcast audio IP codec technology (IP direct dial or via the ARD node 106813020001). Interview requests should be addressed to the university’s Press and Public Relations Office (+49 (0)681 302-64091 or -2601).

Background:
The Saarland Research and Innovation stand at HANNOVER MESSE is organized by Saarland University's Contact Centre for Technology Transfer (KWT). KWT is the central point of contact for companies interested in exploring opportunities for cooperation and collaboration with researchers at Saarland University. Saarland University is a member of the “EXIST” programme initiated by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy. The programme aims to improve the entrepreneurial environment at universities and research institutions and increase the number of technology- and knowledge-based business start-ups. http://www.uni-saarland.de/kwt

Saarland University, Saarland University of Applied Sciences (HTW) and industrial partners are working together at ZeMA in Saarbrücken to strengthen the fields of mechatrocnic engineering and industrial automation in Saarland and to promote technology transfer. ZeMA is home to a large number of industry-specific development projects and projects aiming to transform research findings into practical industrial applications.
http://www.zema.de/

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.lmt.uni-saarland.de
http://www.zema.de/

Claudia Ehrlich | Universität des Saarlandes

Further reports about: IP Innovation KWT Technology damage measurement

More articles from HANNOVER MESSE:

nachricht Measurement of components in 3D under water
01.04.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF

nachricht Artificial hand able to respond sensitively thanks to muscles made from smart metal wires
24.03.2015 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from HANNOVER MESSE >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Forscher spinnen künstliche Seide aus Kuhmolke

Ein schwedisch-deutsches Forscherteam hat bei DESY einen zentralen Prozess für die künstliche Produktion von Seide entschlüsselt. Mit Hilfe von intensivem Röntgenlicht konnten die Wissenschaftler beobachten, wie sich kleine Proteinstückchen – sogenannte Fibrillen – zu einem Faden verhaken. Dabei zeigte sich, dass die längsten Proteinfibrillen überraschenderweise als Ausgangsmaterial schlechter geeignet sind als Proteinfibrillen minderer Qualität. Das Team um Dr. Christofer Lendel und Dr. Fredrik Lundell von der Königlich-Technischen Hochschule (KTH) Stockholm stellt seine Ergebnisse in den „Proceedings“ der US-Akademie der Wissenschaften vor.

Seide ist ein begehrtes Material mit vielen erstaunlichen Eigenschaften: Sie ist ultraleicht, belastbarer als manches Metall und kann extrem elastisch sein....

Im Focus: Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

An Bord einer Höhenforschungsrakete wurde erstmals im Weltraum eine Wolke ultrakalter Atome erzeugt. Damit gelang der MAIUS-Mission der Nachweis, dass quantenoptische Sensoren auch in rauen Umgebungen wie dem Weltraum eingesetzt werden können – eine Voraussetzung, um fundamentale Fragen der Wissenschaft beantworten zu können und ein Innovationstreiber für alltägliche Anwendungen.

Gemäß dem Einstein’schen Äquivalenzprinzip werden alle Körper, unabhängig von ihren sonstigen Eigenschaften, gleich stark durch die Gravitationskraft...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Mikrobe des Jahres 2017: Halobacterium salinarum - einzellige Urform des Sehens

Am 24. Januar 1917 stach Heinrich Klebahn mit einer Nadel in den verfärbten Belag eines gesalzenen Seefischs, übertrug ihn auf festen Nährboden – und entdeckte einige Wochen später rote Kolonien eines "Salzbakteriums". Heute heißt es Halobacterium salinarum und ist genau 100 Jahre später Mikrobe des Jahres 2017, gekürt von der Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie (VAAM). Halobacterium salinarum zählt zu den Archaeen, dem Reich von Mikroben, die zwar Bakterien ähneln, aber tatsächlich enger verwandt mit Pflanzen und Tieren sind.

Rot und salzig
Archaeen sind häufig an außergewöhnliche Lebensräume angepasst, beispielsweise heiße Quellen, extrem saure Gewässer oder – wie H. salinarum – an...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Neuer Algorithmus in der Künstlichen Intelligenz

24.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Gehirn und Immunsystem beim Schlaganfall – Neueste Erkenntnisse zur Interaktion zweier Supersysteme

24.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Hybride Eisschutzsysteme – Lösungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Luftfahrt

23.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Im Interview mit Harald Holzer, Geschäftsführer der vitaliberty GmbH

24.01.2017 | Unternehmensmeldung

MAIUS-1 – erste Experimente mit ultrakalten Atomen im All

24.01.2017 | Physik Astronomie

European XFEL: Forscher können erste Vorschläge für Experimente einreichen

24.01.2017 | Physik Astronomie