Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Hannover Messe: New low friction coating allows grease-free lubrication and corrosion protection


Machine parts wear, if there is friction between their metal surfaces. Lubricants and functional oils help prevent this.

They attract dirt, debris and dust, and over time form lumps or become resinous. Machine parts then have to be intensively cleaned and regreased, which leads to more frequent maintenance, greater consumption of resources, polluting waste or machine breakdowns.

Grease-free lubrication and corrosion protection at once via spray coating.

Copyright: Uwe Bellhäuser, only free within this press release.

Researchers at the INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have now developed a functional coating which lubricates without grease and protects against corrosion at the same time. It is suitable as a coating for metals and metal alloys such as steel, aluminum or magnesium.

From 7 to 11 April 2014, the researchers of the INM will be presenting this and further results in Hall 2 at the stand C48 of the Hannover Messe in the context of the leading trade fair for R & D and Technology Transfer. This includes new developments of transparent and conducting layers, CIGS solar cells, antimicrobial coatings and corrosion protection coatings as well as printed electronics.

"The thing about our low friction coating is its composition and structure”, explains Carsten Becker-Willinger, Head of the Nanomers Program Division. “We have incorporated platelet-like solid lubricants and platelet-like particles in a binder. When this mixture is applied to a surface, it produces a well-ordered structure in which these various particles are arranged in a roof tile pattern”, he adds. This forms a so-called transfer film between the low friction coating and the object through which surfaces can slide with the minimum of friction.

“The particular mixture ratio means that our composite has a very low coefficient of friction. If we only used a solid lubricant, the coefficient of friction would be considerably higher”, says the chemist.

The roof tile structure not only provides low-friction sliding, it also acts as a barrier. This is a particular advantage because as a result the material also prevents moisture or salts penetrating metal surfaces, thus also protecting against corrosion. In a neutral salt spray context, the composite has a corrosion resistance of over 1000 hours on low-alloy steel.

The bonded coating can be applied using classic wet chemistry processes such as spraying or dipping. The roof tile structure forms by simple thermal curing without any further assistance in self-organization.

Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Nanomers
Phone: +49681-9300-196

Your contact at the stand:
Dr. Sabine Schmitz-Stöwe
Dr. Dirk Bentz

The INM will also present its competence within various talks in Hall 2 at the Tech transfer stand.
* „Nanotechnology at the INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4. 2014, 10:15 - 10:30 a.m.
* „Nanotechnology in the Leibniz Network Nano“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4.2014, 12:00 - 12:15 p.m.
* „Nanoparticles for Optics and Electronics“, Dr. Peter William de Oliveira, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:00 - 11:10 a.m.
* „Nanomers - Highly structured integrated functional coatings for practical solutions in industrial applications“, Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:20 - 11:35 a.m.

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological applications and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbruecken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 195 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from HANNOVER MESSE:

nachricht Measurement of components in 3D under water
01.04.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF

nachricht Artificial hand able to respond sensitively thanks to muscles made from smart metal wires
24.03.2015 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from HANNOVER MESSE >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Die Quanten-Schnüffelnase

Der Laser, der zugleich ein Detektor ist: An der TU Wien wurde ein mikroskopisch kleiner Sensor entwickelt, mit dem man gleichzeitig verschiedene Gase nachweisen kann.

Wir Menschen erschnüffeln unterschiedliche Gerüche und Düfte durch chemische Rezeptoren in unserer Nase. Doch für den technischen Nachweis von Gasen greift man...

Im Focus: „Molekül-Selfie“ enthüllt den Aufbruch einer chemischen Bindung

Wissenschaftlern des Institute of Photonic Sciences (Barcelona) ist es gelungen, die Position aller Atome eines Moleküls zu verfolgen während der Aufbruch einer der chemischen Bindungen ein einzelnes Proton freisetzt. Hierzu wurde ein am Heidelberger Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik entwickeltes Reaktionsmikroskop verwendet [Science, 21. Oktober 2016].

Man stelle sich vor, die einzelnen Atome eines Moleküls ließen sich während einer chemischen Reaktion beobachten: Wie sie sich umlagern, um eine neue Substanz...

Im Focus: Elektronik mit Licht beschleunigen

Wissenschaftler am MPQ haben mit ultrakurzen Laserpulsen die schnellsten jemals erzeugten elektrischen Ströme in Festkörpern gemessen. Die Elektronen führten in einer Sekunde achtmillionen Milliarden Schwingungen aus, ein absoluter Rekord für die Steuerung von Elektronen in Festkörpern.

Die Leistungsfähigkeit von modernen elektronischen Geräten wie Computern oder Mobilfunkgeräten wird durch die Geschwindigkeit bestimmt, mit der die...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Innovative Lösungen für multifunktionale Werkstoffe und effiziente kurze Prozessketten

IPF Dresden präsentiert sich im Science Campus der Kunststoffmesse 2016

Auf der weltgrößten Kunststoffmesse K 2016 vom 19. bis 26. Oktober 2016 in Düsseldorf präsentiert sich das Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e. V....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics

Experten treffen sich am 27. Oktober zum siebten „NORTH Regio Day on Infection“ in Braunschweig

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Sicherheit und Vertrauen in der vernetzten Welt

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Fachtagung „55. Heidelberger Grand Round“ mit internationalen Krebsexperten

20.10.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Die Quanten-Schnüffelnase

21.10.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Sterilkonnektoren der nächsten Generation

21.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Neuer Mechanismus hinter der Wirkung von Hautkrebs-Medikament Imiquimod entschlüsselt

21.10.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie