Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Electronic micro and conductor strips for touch screens in the one-step process: Photometallization

31.03.2014

Electronic conductor strips determine the operational capability of a number of devices and instruments such as in TFT screens on displays and touch screens or in transponders in RFID systems where structures with large conductor strips measuring several millimeters vary, the smallest structures measuring just a few micro- or nanometers.

Up to now, these conductor strips have been manufactured in different production stages, but researchers at the INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have developed a new process with which they can create macroscopic and microscopic conductor strips in a single production step.


Electronic micro and conductor strips via Photometallization.

Copyright: INM

From 7 to 11 April 2014, the researchers of the INM will be presenting this and further results in Hall 2 at the stand C48 of the Hannover Messe in the context of the leading trade fair for R & D and Technology Transfer. This includes new developments for CIGS thin film solar cells, corrosion protection coatings and low-friction coatings as well as antimicrobial coatings and TCO inks.

To produce these conductor strips, the developers give a substrate a photoactive layer consisting of metal oxide nanoparticles. “We then apply a colorless UV-stable silver complex”, explains Peter William de Oliveira, Head of the Optical Materials Program Division. By exposing this series of layers to light, the silver complex on the photoactive layer is broken down and the silver ions reduced to silver. This process offers a number of advantages, including the fact that it is rapid, flexible, low-cost and environmentally friendly.

As there is only one step of exposure to light followed by rinsing with water, production takes just a few minutes. Further process steps for post-treatment are not required; even heat treatment is quite unnecessary. Using this process, researchers at the INM are achieving layers up to 100 nanometers thick and a specific conductivity around a quarter of that of pure silver. Heat treatment at 120°C increases the conductivity to half that of silver.

This basic principle allows researchers at the INM to very individually apply conductor strips of different sizes to substrates such as glass or plastic. “There are three different options that we can use as required. “Writing” using a UV laser is particularly good for the first customized production and testing of a new conductor strip design, but this method is too time-consuming for mass production”, explains physicist de Oliveira.

Photomasks that are only UV-permeable at the desired positions can also be used for structuring. “The production of these masks is quite costly and has a high environmental impact. For a “semi-continuous process” they are particularly suitable for solid substrates such as glass”, says the materials expert, but they were not suitable for a potential roll-to-roll process because they are mainly composed of quartz glass and are not flexible.

The researchers are currently focusing their efforts on a third method using so-called transparent stamps. “These stamps mechanically displace the silver complex, and where there is no silver there is also no conductor strip”, in de Oliveira’s opinion. “So we can form structures measuring just a few micrometers. Since the stamps are made of a flexible polymer, we have here the possibility of arranging them on a roll. Because they are transparent, we are working on incorporating the UV source in the roll, so the first steps would be done for a roll-to-roll process”, the Head of the Program Division sums up. This has enabled conductor strip structures of different sizes to be produced on substrates such as polyethylene or polycarbonate film on a large scale.

Contact:
Dr. Peter William de Oliveira
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Optical Materials
Phone: +49681-9300-148
peter.oliveira@inm-gmbh.de
Your contact at the stand:
Dr. Thomas Müller
Dr. Michael Opsölder

The INM will also present its competence within various talks in Hall 2 at the Tech transfer stand.
* „Nanotechnology at the INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4. 2014, 10:15 - 10:30 a.m.
* „Nanotechnology in the Leibniz Network Nano“, Dr. Mario Quilitz, Monday, 7.4.2014, 12:00 - 12:15 p.m.
* „Nanoparticles for Optics and Electronics“, Dr. Peter William de Oliveira, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:00 - 11:10 a.m.
* „Nanomers - Highly structured integrated functional coatings for practical solutions in industrial applications“, Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger, Tuesday, 8.4.2014, 11:20 - 11:35 a.m.

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological applications and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbruecken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 195 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.inm-gmbh.de/en

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from HANNOVER MESSE:

nachricht Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes
06.02.2018 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

nachricht Measurement of components in 3D under water
01.04.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF

All articles from HANNOVER MESSE >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

Mit Hilfe einer neuen Lasertechnologie haben es Physiker vom Labor für Attosekundenphysik der LMU und des MPQ geschafft, Attosekunden-Lichtblitze mit hoher Intensität und Photonenenergie zu produzieren. Damit konnten sie erstmals die Interaktion mehrere Photonen in einem Attosekundenpuls mit Elektronen aus einer inneren atomaren Schale beobachten konnten.

Wer die ultraschnelle Bewegung von Elektronen in inneren atomaren Schalen beobachten möchte, der benötigt ultrakurze und intensive Lichtblitze bei genügend...

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

Eine Gruppe von Forschern um Andrea Cavalleri am Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie (MPSD) in Hamburg hat eine Methode demonstriert, die es erlaubt die interatomaren Kräfte eines Festkörpers detailliert auszumessen. Ihr Artikel Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, nun online in Nature veröffentlich, erläutert, wie Terahertz-Laserpulse die Atome eines Festkörpers zu extrem hohen Auslenkungen treiben können.

Die zeitaufgelöste Messung der sehr unkonventionellen atomaren Bewegungen, die einer Anregung mit extrem starken Lichtpulsen folgen, ermöglichte es der...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Verlässliche Quantencomputer entwickeln

Internationalem Forschungsteam gelingt wichtiger Schritt auf dem Weg zur Lösung von Zertifizierungsproblemen

Quantencomputer sollen künftig algorithmische Probleme lösen, die selbst die größten klassischen Superrechner überfordern. Doch wie lässt sich prüfen, dass der...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Von festen Körpern und Philosophen

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Spannungsfeld Elektromobilität

23.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2018

21.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Vorstoß ins Innere der Atome

23.02.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Wirt oder Gast? Proteomik gibt neue Aufschlüsse über Reaktion von Rifforganismen auf Umweltstress

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Wie Zellen unterschiedlich auf Stress reagieren

23.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics