Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Trend in Young Adults’ Dating Habits, Committed Relationships May Not Lead to Marriage

26.07.2011
Trend may help explain decline in marriage rate, particularly among young adults

Changes in relationship formation and dissolution in the past 50 years have revealed new patterns in romantic relations among young adults. The U.S. Census indicates that young people are choosing to marry later and cohabitating more often than past generations.

Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that people in their 20s are redefining dating by engaging in “stayover relationships,” spending three or more nights together each week while maintaining the option of going to their own homes.

Tyler Jamison, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, found that routine overnight dates are common among college students in dating relationships.

“Instead of following a clear path from courtship to marriage, individuals are choosing to engage in romantic ties on their own terms – without the guidance of social norms,” said Tyler Jamison, a researcher in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS). “There is a gap between the teen years and adulthood during which we don’t know much about the dating behaviors of young adults. Stayovers are the unique answer to what emerging adults are doing in their relationships.”

Jamison found that “stayover relationships” are a growing trend among college-aged couples who are committed, but not interested in cohabiting. However, little is known about the effects of stayovers on future commitment decisions or marriage.

“A key motivation is to enjoy the comforts of an intimate relationship while maintaining a high degree of personal control over one’s involvement and commitment,” said Larry Ganong, professor in HDFS. “We see this interest in personal control nationally in more single adult households, and in the growing phenomenon of ‘living apart together’ (middle-aged and older monogamous couples who maintain their own households). It may also help explain why marriage is on the decline, particularly among young adults.”

Jamison conducted interviews among college-educated adults who were in committed, exclusive relationships. She found that although living together before marriage has become less taboo, many young adults want to avoid the potential negative social consequences of cohabitation.

“As soon as couples live together, it becomes more difficult to break up,” Jamison said. “At that point, they have probably signed a lease, bought a couch and acquired a dog, making it harder to disentangle their lives should they break up. Staying over doesn’t present those entanglements.”

Jamison found that couples who had a stayover routine were content in their relationships, but did not necessarily plan to get married or move in together.

“Many college-aged adults are students who will soon be facing a transition point in their lives,” Jamison said. “Most students do not have a definite plan for where they will live or work after graduation, and stayovers are a way for couples to have comfort and convenience without the commitment of living together or having long-term plans.”

The study, “We’re not living together: Stayover relationships among college-educated emerging adults,” is in the current issue of the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. Jamison recommends future research to determine the effect of stayovers on marriage and divorce rates. Her follow-up research is focused on stayover relationships in unmarried parents. She is a doctoral candidate in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences.

Samantha Craven | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.missouri.edu

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected
21.02.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Polluted air may pollute our morality
08.02.2018 | Association for Psychological Science

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Software mit Grips

Ein computergestütztes Netzwerk zeigt, wie die Ionenkanäle in der Membran von Nervenzellen so verschiedenartige Fähigkeiten wie Kurzzeitgedächtnis und Hirnwellen steuern können

Nervenzellen, die auch dann aktiv sind, wenn der auslösende Reiz verstummt ist, sind die Grundlage für ein Kurzzeitgedächtnis. Durch rhythmisch aktive...

Im Focus: Der komplette Zellatlas und Stammbaum eines unsterblichen Plattwurms

Von einer einzigen Stammzelle zur Vielzahl hochdifferenzierter Körperzellen: Den vollständigen Stammbaum eines ausgewachsenen Organismus haben Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus Berlin und München in „Science“ publiziert. Entscheidend war der kombinierte Einsatz von RNA- und computerbasierten Technologien.

Wie werden aus einheitlichen Stammzellen komplexe Körperzellen mit sehr unterschiedlichen Funktionen? Die Differenzierung von Stammzellen in verschiedenste...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Verbesserte Stabilität von Kunststoff-Leuchtdioden

Polymer-Leuchtdioden (PLEDs) sind attraktiv für den Einsatz in großflächigen Displays und Lichtpanelen, aber ihre begrenzte Stabilität verhindert die Kommerzialisierung. Wissenschaftler aus dem Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung (MPIP) in Mainz haben jetzt die Ursachen der Instabilität aufgedeckt.

Bildschirme und Smartphones, die gerollt und hochgeklappt werden können, sind Anwendungen, die in Zukunft durch die Entwicklung von polymerbasierten...

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Internationale Konferenz zur Digitalisierung

19.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

124. Internistenkongress in Mannheim: Internisten rücken Altersmedizin in den Fokus

19.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - Juni 2018

17.04.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Grösster Elektrolaster der Welt nimmt Arbeit auf

20.04.2018 | Interdisziplinäre Forschung

Bilder magnetischer Strukturen auf der Nano-Skala

20.04.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Kieler Forschende entschlüsseln neuen Baustein in der Entwicklung des globalen Klimas

20.04.2018 | Geowissenschaften

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics