Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

How serious is son preference in China?

15.06.2011
Why are female foetuses aborted in China? Does an increase in the number of abortions of female foetuses reflect an increase in son preference? Sociologist Lisa Eklund from Lund University in Sweden has studied why families in China have a preference for sons.

At the time of the census in 2005, almost 121 boys were born for every 100 girls. Last year’s census showed that sex ratio at birth (SRB) had improved somewhat. But it is still too early to celebrate, in Eklund’s view: the narrowing of the gap does not necessarily mean that girls are valued more highly.

Because of the high SRB, there has been a tendency to picture China as a country where son preference is strong and possibly increasing since the 1980s. However, Eklund argues in her PhD thesis that using SRB as a proxy indicator for son preference is problematic. She has therefore developed a model to estimate what she calls “son compulsion”, where data on SRB and total fertility rate are used to estimate the proportion of couples who wants to give birth to at least one son and who take action to achieve that goal. When looking at variation in son compulsion over time and between regions, Eklund finds that new patterns emerge that do not surface when using SRB as a proxy indicator. Contrary to popular belief, son compulsion remained steady in rural China (at around 10 per cent) while it increased in urban China in the 1990s (from 2.8 per cent to 4.5 per cent).

“This doubling concurred in time with cuts in the state welfare system in the cities, which meant that adult sons were given a more important role in providing for the social and financial security of the elderly”, she says. Her findings call into question the assumption that son preference is essentially a rural issue. They also have implications for comparative perspectives and her findings suggest that son compulsion may be higher in other countries even though they expose lower SRB.

When it emerged that far more boys than girls were being born in China, the Chinese government launched the Care for Girls Campaign to improve the value of the girl child and to prevent sex-selective abortion. Nonetheless, the imbalance between the sexes continued to increase. Eklund’s findings suggest that the campaign may actually have done more harm than good. Families receive extra support if they have girls and in rural areas exceptions are made from the one-child policy if the first child is a girl.

“By compensating parents of girls in various ways, the government reinforces the idea that girls are not as valuable as boys”, says Eklund.

Eklund further challenges the notion that families in rural areas want sons because sons are expected to take over the farming.

“That is a weak argument”, says Eklund. “Young people, both men and women, are moving away from rural areas. Of those who stay, women provide just as much help as men. In fact, it is the elderly who end up taking greater responsibility for the agriculture.”

However, there are also other reasons why sons are seen as more important for families. Traditionally, a girl moves in with her husband’s family when she gets married and she thus cannot look after her own parents when they grow old. Boys also play an important role in ancestor worship, and they ensure that the family name lives on.

Eklund further finds that there is a stubbornness in both popular and official discourses to view son preference as a matter of parents and grandparents without looking at structural factors that help underpin the institution of son preference.

Lisa Eklund’s thesis is entitled Rethinking Son Preference. Gender, Population Dynamics and Social Change in the People’s Republic of China. Lisa Eklund defended her thesis on 10 June 2011 at Lund University, Sweden.

NOTE: This text has been cleared by Lisa Eklund, as opposed to a text on the same topic that was circulated on 13 June 2011. She can be contacted at Lisa.Eklund@soc.lu.se or +46 709 58 20 02.

Thesis: Rethinking Son Preference. Gender, Population Dynamics and Social Change in the People’s Republic of China

Megan Grindlay | idw
Further information:
http://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/o.o.i.s?id=12683&postid=1950819
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Risk taking across the life span: The effects of hardship
08.01.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht Using social media for professional purposes – does it pay off?
08.12.2015 | Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Gravitationswellen 100 Jahre nach Einsteins Vorhersage entdeckt

LIGO öffnet mit der Beobachtung kollidierender schwarzer Löcher ein neues Fenster zum Universum / Entscheidende Beiträge von Forschern der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und der Leibniz Universität Hannover

Zum ersten Mal haben Wissenschaftler Kräuselungen der Raumzeit, sogenannte Gravitationswellen, beobachtet, die – ausgelöst von einem Großereignis im fernen...

Im Focus: Messkampagne POLSTRACC: Starker Ozonabbau über der Arktis möglich

Die arktische Stratosphäre war in diesem Winter bisher außergewöhnlich kalt, damit sind alle Voraussetzungen für das Auftreten eines starken Ozonabbaus in den nächsten Wochen gegeben. Diesen Schluss legen erste Ergebnisse der vom Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) koordinierten Messkampagne POLSTRACC nahe, die seit Ende 2015 in der Arktis läuft. Eine wesentliche Rolle spielen dabei vertikal ausgedehnte polare Stratosphärenwolken, die zuletzt weite Bereiche der Arktis bedeckten: An ihrer Oberfläche finden chemische Reaktionen statt, welche den Ozonabbau beschleunigen. Diese Wolken haben die Klimaforscher nun ungewöhnlicherweise bis in den untersten Bereich der Stratosphäre beobachtet.

„Weite Bereiche der Arktis waren über einen Zeitraum von mehreren Wochen von polaren Stratosphärenwolken zwischen etwa 14 und 26 Kilometern Höhe bedeckt –...

Im Focus: AIDS-Impfstoffproduktion in Algen

Pflanzen und Mikroorganismen werden vielfältig zur Medikamentenproduktion genutzt. Die Produktion solcher Biopharmazeutika in Pflanzen nennt man auch „Molecular Pharming“. Sie ist ein stetig wachsendes Feld der Pflanzenbiotechnologie. Hauptorganismen sind vor allem Hefe und Nutzpflanzen, wie Mais und Kartoffel – Pflanzen mit einem hohen Pflege- und Platzbedarf. Forscher um Prof. Ralph Bock am Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie in Potsdam wollen mit Hilfe von Algen ein ressourcenschonenderes System für die Herstellung von Medikamenten und Impfstoffen verfügbar machen. Die Praxistauglichkeit untersuchten sie an einem potentiellen AIDS-Impfstoff.

Die Produktion von Arzneimitteln in Pflanzen und Mikroorganismen ist nicht neu. Bereits 1982 gelang es, durch den Einsatz gentechnischer Methoden, Bakterien so...

Im Focus: Einzeller mit Durchblick: Wie Bakterien „sehen“

Ein 300 Jahre altes Rätsel der Biologie ist geknackt. Wie eine internationale Forschergruppe aus Deutschland, Großbritannien und Portugal herausgefunden hat, nutzen Cyanobakterien – weltweit vorkommende mikroskopisch kleine Einzeller – das Funktionsprinzip des Linsenauges, um Licht wahrzunehmen und sich darauf zuzubewegen. Der Schlüssel zu des Rätsels Lösung war eine Idee aus Karlsruhe: Jan Gerrit Korvink, Professor am KIT und Leiter des Instituts für Mikrostrukturtechnik (IMT) am KIT, nutzte Siliziumplatten und UV-Licht, um den Brechungsindex der Einzeller zu messen.

 

Im Focus: Production of an AIDS vaccine in algae

Today, plants and microorganisms are heavily used for the production of medicinal products. The production of biopharmaceuticals in plants, also referred to as “Molecular Pharming”, represents a continuously growing field of plant biotechnology. Preferred host organisms include yeast and crop plants, such as maize and potato – plants with high demands. With the help of a special algal strain, the research team of Prof. Ralph Bock at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam strives to develop a more efficient and resource-saving system for the production of medicines and vaccines. They tested its practicality by synthesizing a component of a potential AIDS vaccine.

The use of plants and microorganisms to produce pharmaceuticals is nothing new. In 1982, bacteria were genetically modified to produce human insulin, a drug...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

SUMA-Kongress 2016 – Die offene Web-Gesellschaft 4.0

12.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Career Center deutscher Hochschulen tagen an der Europa-Universität Viadrina

12.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Frauen in der digitalen Arbeitswelt: Gestaltung für die IT-Branche und das Ingenieurswesen

11.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Ultraschnelle Kontrolle von Spinströmen durch Laserlicht

12.02.2016 | Physik Astronomie

SCHOTT stellt auf der Photonics West zukunftsweisende Lösungen für die Optik vor

12.02.2016 | Messenachrichten

Große Sauerstoffquellen im Erdinneren

12.02.2016 | Geowissenschaften