Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

New report shows seniors' economic security falling

20.07.2011
About 75 percent of senior households have little or no buffer against trauma

Outliving one's resources and falling into poverty is an increasingly common experience among today's senior citizens, according to a new report produced jointly by the Heller School's Institute on Assets and Social Policy and the public policy research and advocacy organization Demos.

And, researchers say, the situation could deteriorate further if cuts in Social Security are made.

The report, "From Bad to Worse: Senior Economic Insecurity On the Rise," found that seniors have too few resources and too little time to plan for a fulfilling retirement.

In only four years, the ranks of seniors at risk of outliving their resources increased by nearly 2 million households. Using the Senior Financial Stability Index, economic insecurity among senior households increased by one-third, rising from 27 percent to 36 percent from 2004 to 2008. This steady and dramatic increase was in progress even before the full force of the Great Recession hit.

While effects of the recession hit all demographic groups, the economic security of seniors has deteriorated more than the security of other groups. In addition to the one of every three seniors who is economically insecure, 40 percent of senior households are financially vulnerable - neither secure nor insecure according to the Senior Financial Security Index. Thus, three-quarters of all senior households have little or no buffer against financial ruin should they be faced with an unexpected illness or other traumatic life event.

In the hardest hit senior populations in America - households of color and senior single women - 50 percent fall into this economically insecure category, unsure of how to finance even the most basic necessities.

To stem the growing crisis, the report proposes:

strengthening Social Security for vulnerable groups, such as low-income earners and those with sporadic attachment to the labor market due to caregiving and other responsibilities

supporting a strong Community Living Assistance Services and Supports program (CLASS Act) to enable working adults the opportunity to plan for future long-term care needs, such as in-home services, adult day health or institutional care.

"It's simply a crime that in our wealthy and vibrant nation 36 percent of seniors live in a state of uncertainty - unsure of whether they can afford basic necessities," says Tatjana Meschede, research director at the Institute on Assets and Social Policy and co-author of the report.

"Instead of working to fix this crisis, the debate in Washington is dominated by those who argue that the only way to reduce the deficit is by dramatically altering Medicare and Social Security," she said. "These reckless proposals will only worsen current trends and further undermine the economic prospects of future seniors."

Jennifer Wheary, Demos senior fellow, says millions of seniors in America live day to day; this is a multigenerational problem, not a senior problem.

"We cannot end senior economic insecurity without addressing the early sources of this grave issue," says Wheary. "We must take steps to strengthen pension provisions to ensure the stability of employer and employee investments if we want to ensure millions retire with the funds they need and deserve."

For more information visit iasp.brandeis.edu or download the report
"From Bad to Worse" is the newest analysis in the IASP-Demos series entitled "Living Longer on Less."

Susan Chaityn Lebovits | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.brandies.edu

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Risk taking across the life span: The effects of hardship
08.01.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht Using social media for professional purposes – does it pay off?
08.12.2015 | Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Weltweit genaueste optische Einzelionen-Uhr

Als erste Forschergruppe weltweit haben Atomuhren-Spezialisten der Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt (PTB) jetzt eine optische Einzelionen-Uhr gebaut, die eine bisher nur theoretisch vorhergesagte Genauigkeit erreicht. Ihre optische Ytterbium-Uhr erreichte eine relative systematische Messunsicherheit von 3 E-18. Die Ergebnisse sind in der aktuellen Ausgabe der Fachzeitschrift Physical Review Letters veröffentlicht.

Als erste Forschergruppe weltweit haben Atomuhren-Spezialisten der Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt (PTB) jetzt eine optische Einzelionen-Uhr gebaut, die...

Im Focus: The most accurate optical single-ion clock worldwide

Atomic clock experts from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are the first research group in the world to have built an optical single-ion clock which attains an accuracy which had only been predicted theoretically so far. Their optical ytterbium clock achieved a relative systematic measurement uncertainty of 3 E-18. The results have been published in the current issue of the scientific journal "Physical Review Letters".

Atomic clock experts from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are the first research group in the world to have built an optical single-ion clock...

Im Focus: Autonome Nanosatelliten in Arbeit

Zwei neue Weltraumprojekte werden an der Universität Würzburg vorbereitet: Sie sollen unter anderem die Beobachtung von Planeten und die autonome Fehlerkorrektur an Bord von Satelliten ermöglichen. Das Bundeswirtschaftsministerium fördert die Projekte mit rund 1,6 Millionen Euro.

Wirbelstürme erkennen, die über den Mars fegen. Meteore detektieren, die auf die Erde hinabstürzen. Ungewöhnliche Blitze erforschen, die aus der Erdatmosphäre...

Im Focus: Goodbye ground control: autonomous nanosatellites

The University of Würzburg has two new space projects in the pipeline which are concerned with the observation of planets and autonomous fault correction aboard satellites. The German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy funds the projects with around 1.6 million euros.

Detecting tornadoes that sweep across Mars. Discovering meteors that fall to Earth. Investigating strange lightning that flashes from Earth's atmosphere into...

Im Focus: Fließphänomene an festen Oberflächen: Grenzflächengeschwindigkeit als wichtige Größe nachgewiesen

Wie man bewirken kann, dass Flüssigkeiten auf festen Oberflächen fast wie ein Schlitten gleiten können, haben jetzt Physiker der Saar-Universität gemeinsam mit Forscherkollegen aus Paris gezeigt: Möglich ist das durch Beschichtungen, die an der Grenzfläche zwischen Flüssigkeit und Oberfläche ein Rutschen der Flüssigkeit provozieren. In der Folge vergrößern sich auch die mittlere Fließgeschwindigkeit und der Durchsatz. Gezeigt wurde dies am Verhalten von Tropfen auf verschieden beschichteten Oberflächen beim Übergang in den Gleichgewichtszustand. Die Ergebnisse könnten für die Optimierung industrieller Prozesse nutzbar sein, beispielsweise zur Verarbeitung von Kunststoffen.

Die Studie wurde in der Fachzeitschrift PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America) veröffentlicht.

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verhaltensmedizin und Verhaltensmodifikation tagt in Mainz

10.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Bericht zur weltweiten Lage der Bestäuber

10.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

18. Chemnitzer Linux-Tage: "Es ist Dein Projekt"

10.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Weltweit genaueste optische Einzelionen-Uhr

10.02.2016 | Geowissenschaften

Genauer messen in kurzer Zeit

10.02.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Protein steuert Fetteinlagerung und Leberstoffwechsel

10.02.2016 | Förderungen Preise