Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

College-educated undocumented young adults face same narrow range of jobs as their parents

26.07.2011
Parents who move to the United States without legal status generally seek better opportunities for their young children. Their kids grow up Americanized: speaking English, attending public school, going to the prom and dreaming about what they want to do when they grow up.

Many assume these youths will achieve more than their parents. But a survey of life trajectories of undocumented young adults raised and educated in America shows that they end up with the same labor jobs as their parents, working in construction, restaurants, cleaning and childcare services.

The results appear in the August issue of American Sociological Review.

"This is a population of young people who, because of their legal integration through the school system, learned to work hard and pursue the American dream," said Roberto G. Gonzales, author of the survey and an assistant professor at the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration. "Many of them grew up believing that being able to speak English and having an education should be able to get them more than their parents."

Gonzales did the study while he was an assistant professor at the University of Washington's School of Social Work. He conducted life history interviews with 150 mostly Mexican-origin undocumented young adults – about equal numbers of men and women – who had been brought to the U.S. before age 12. The respondents lived in the Los Angeles metropolitan area and were 20 to 34 years old.

His findings could illuminate how current immigration laws don't adequately accommodate the ever-increasing number – now at 2.1 million – of children and young adults who are brought to the U.S. as children and left to figure out how to navigate their adult lives without legal status.

"Through the U.S. public school system, undocumented children are integrated into the legal framework of this country," Gonzales said. "But as they reach adulthood, they are cut off from the means through which to live the lives for which school prepared them."

Gonzales, a sociologist, wanted to learn how undocumented youths learn of their immigration status and how they come to cope with its effects on their identity, friendships, career aspirations and daily lives.

Most of the people surveyed told Gonzales that they first felt the effects of their non-legal status between the ages of 16-18, usually when they sought part-time jobs, driver's licenses or admission to college, which require a social security number.

Many respondents told Gonzales that they felt confused, angry, frustrated, scared and stigmatized when they learned of their immigration status. Their social habits changed out of fear of who to trust. Career plans halted. Arrest and deportation became constant threats for many, Gonzales said.

Returning to their native country was not a viable option for most of the respondents, because they lacked important social and professional connections, job options, Spanish fluency and familiarity with the culture and customs of their birth country.

Miguel, one of the respondents, had intended to go to college and then law school. When his mother told him in high school that he wasn't legal, he said: "I didn't know what to do. I couldn't see my future anymore."

Cory, age 22, blamed her parents for not telling her sooner about her non-legal status. "I feel like a kid, I can't do anything adults do," she said. Most respondents expressed similar sentiments of developmental limbo.

Seventy-seven of the respondents decided to go to college as a way to stay legally protected by the school system and to try to improve their career options. Relationships with teachers, friends and family were key to whether the respondents attended college, Gonzales found.

But college experience didn't help the respondents broaden their job options. Once they left school, they faced the same narrow range of jobs as their parents and high school peers who did not go to college. None of the 22 respondents who had graduated from four-year universities, or the nine who held graduate degrees, was able to legally pursue their chosen careers.

By their late 20s, respondents reported coming to grips with their illegal status, focusing on what they could do rather than what they couldn't.

Gabriel, a 28-year-old who attended some community college classes, told Gonzales that he sees work as just one piece of his life and that he gets more satisfaction out of his relationship with his girlfriend and being in a dance circle. "I just get sick of being controlled by the lack of nine digits," he said.

"His aspirations flattened, he accepted his fate," Gonzales said of Gabriel. "Is that why we educate our youngsters? Is that the future we want for them?"

Gonzales said that educators and policymakers have important roles to play in helping undocumented youth transition into adulthood. "The problems facing undocumented children and young adults underscore the need for a more diverse approach to immigration policy," he said.

The study was funded by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, contact Gonzales at 773-834-1763 or rggonzales@uchicago.edu.

Molly McElroy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uw.edu

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Amazingly flexible: Learning to read in your thirties profoundly transforms the brain
26.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

Ob als Smartphone-App für die Fahrkarte im Nahverkehr, als Geldwertkarten für das Schwimmbad oder in Form einer Bonuskarte für den Supermarkt: Für viele gehören „elektronische Geldbörsen“ längst zum Alltag. Doch vielen Kunden ist nicht klar, dass sie mit der Nutzung dieser Angebote weitestgehend auf ihre Privatsphäre verzichten. Am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) entsteht ein sicheres und anonymes System, das gleichzeitig Alltagstauglichkeit verspricht. Es wird nun auf der Konferenz ACM CCS 2017 in den USA vorgestellt.

Es ist vor allem das fehlende Problembewusstsein, das den Informatiker Andy Rupp von der Arbeitsgruppe „Kryptographie und Sicherheit“ am KIT immer wieder...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Topologische Isolatoren: Neuer Phasenübergang entdeckt

Physiker des HZB haben an BESSY II Materialien untersucht, die zu den topologischen Isolatoren gehören. Dabei entdeckten sie einen neuen Phasenübergang zwischen zwei unterschiedlichen topologischen Phasen. Eine dieser Phasen ist ferroelektrisch: das bedeutet, dass sich im Material spontan eine elektrische Polarisation ausbildet, die sich durch ein äußeres elektrisches Feld umschalten lässt. Dieses Ergebnis könnte neue Anwendungen wie das Schalten zwischen unterschiedlichen Leitfähigkeiten ermöglichen.

Topologische Isolatoren zeichnen sich dadurch aus, dass sie an ihren Oberflächen Strom sehr gut leiten, während sie im Innern Isolatoren sind. Zu dieser neuen...

Im Focus: Smarte Sensoren für effiziente Prozesse

Materialfehler im Endprodukt können in vielen Industriebereichen zu frühzeitigem Versagen führen und den sicheren Gebrauch der Erzeugnisse massiv beeinträchtigen. Eine Schlüsselrolle im Rahmen der Qualitätssicherung kommt daher intelligenten, zerstörungsfreien Sensorsystemen zu, die es erlauben, Bauteile schnell und kostengünstig zu prüfen, ohne das Material selbst zu beschädigen oder die Oberfläche zu verändern. Experten des Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken präsentieren vom 7. bis 10. November 2017 auf der Blechexpo in Stuttgart zwei Exponate, die eine schnelle, zuverlässige und automatisierte Materialcharakterisierung und Fehlerbestimmung ermöglichen (Halle 5, Stand 5306).

Bei Verwendung zeitaufwändiger zerstörender Prüfverfahren zieht die Qualitätsprüfung durch die Beschädigung oder Zerstörung der Produkte enorme Kosten nach...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Smart MES 2017: die Fertigung der Zukunft

18.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - Dezember 2017

17.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Intelligente Messmethoden für die Bauwerkssicherheit: Fachtagung „Messen im Bauwesen“ am 14.11.2017

17.10.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Smart MES 2017: die Fertigung der Zukunft

18.10.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Sicheres Bezahlen ohne Datenspur

17.10.2017 | Informationstechnologie

Pflanzen gegen Staunässe schützen

17.10.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie