Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Warmer soils release additional CO2 into atmosphere; Effect stabilizes over longer term

21.01.2013
Warmer temperatures due to climate change could cause soils to release additional carbon into the atmosphere, thereby enhancing climate change – but that effect diminishes over the long term, finds a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change.

The study, from University of New Hampshire professor Serita Frey and co-authors from the University of California-Davis and the Marine Biological Laboratory, sheds new light on how soil microorganisms respond to temperature and could improve predictions of how climate warming will affect the carbon dioxide flux from soils.

The activities of soil microorganisms release 10 times the carbon dioxide that human activities do on a yearly basis. Historically, this release of carbon dioxide has been kept in check by plants' uptake of the gas from the atmosphere. However, human activities are potentially upsetting this balance.

Frey and co-authors Johan Six and Juhwan Lee of UC-Davis and Jerry Melillo of the Marine Biological Laboratory were curious how increased temperatures due to climate change might alter the amount of carbon released from soils. "While they're low on the charisma scale, soil microorganisms are so critically important to the carbon balance of the atmosphere," Frey says. "If we warm the soil due to climate warming, are we going to fundamentally alter the flux of carbon into the atmosphere in a way that is going to feed back to enhance climate change?"

Yes, the researchers found. And no.
The study examined the efficiency of soil organisms – how completely they utilize food sources to maintain their cellular machinery – depending upon the food source and the temperature under two different scenarios. In the first short-term scenario, these researchers found that warming temperatures had little effect on soils' ability to use glucose, a simple food source released from the roots of plants. For phenol, a more complex food source common in decomposing wood or leaves, soils showed a 60 percent drop in efficiency at higher temperatures.

"As you increase temperature, you decrease the efficiency – soil microorganisms release more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere – but only for the more complex food sources," Frey explains. "You could infer that as the soil warms, more carbon dioxide will be released into the atmosphere, exacerbating the climate problem."

That effect diminishes, however, in the second scenario, in which soils were warmed to 5 degrees Celsius above the ambient temperature for 18 years. "When the soil was heated to simulate climate warming, we saw a change in the community to be more efficient in the longer term," Frey says, lessening the amount of carbon dioxide the soils release into the atmosphere and, in turn, their impact on the climate. "The positive feedback response may not be as strong as we originally predicted."

The research team also examined how changes in soil microorganism efficiency might influence long term storage of carbon in soils as predicted by a commonly used ecosystem model. Models of this type are used to simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics in response to different perturbations, such as land-use change and climate warming. These models generally assume that efficiency is fixed and that it does not change with temperature or other environmental conditions. The team found a large effect on long-term soil carbon storage as predicted by the model when they varied carbon use efficiency in a fashion comparable to what they observed in their experiments. "There is clearly a need for new models that incorporate an efficiency parameter that is allowed to fluctuate in response to temperature and other environmental variables," Six says.

The researchers hypothesize that long-term warming may change the community of soil microorganisms so that it becomes more efficient. Organism adaptation, change in the species that comprise the soils, and/or changes in the availability of various nutrients could result in this increased efficiency.

This study was based on work done at the Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research site in Petersham, Mass., where Frey and Melillo have been warming two sites – one 9 meters square, the other 36 meters square -- with underground cables for two versus 18 years. "It's like having a heating blanket under the forest floor," Frey says, "allowing us to examine how this particular environmental change—long-term soil warming—is altering how the soil functions."

The article, "The Temperature Response of Soil Microbial Efficiency and its Feedback to Climate," is published in the advanced online publication of Nature Climate Change on Jan. 20, 2013. To access the abstract or full text (subscribers only) of the article after the embargo lifts, use the digital object identifier (DOI) number 10.1038/NCLIMATE1796 at this link: http://dx.doi.org/.

This work was supported by an NSF Faculty Early Career Development Award, the NSF Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) Program, a DOE National Institute for Climatic Change Research (NICCR) grant, and a Harvard Forest Bullard Fellowship to Frey.

Photographs available to download:

http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2013/jan/frey.jpg
Caption: Serita Frey, professor of natural resources at the University of New Hampshire

Credit: Perry Smith, UNH Photographic Services

http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2013/jan/forestplot.jpg
Caption: Research sites at the Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research site in Petersham, Mass., where Frey and Melillo have been warming two sites with underground cables. The photo was taken during a January thaw on a 50-degree day; the heated plots, which had been snow-covered, melted before the unheated ones.

Credit: Alix Contosa, postdoctoral researcher at UNH

http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2013/jan/freyinfield.jpg
Caption: Serita Frey (left) collects samples with UMass-Amherst graduate student George Hamaoui at Harvard Forest.

Credit: Brian Godbois, research assistant at UNH

http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2013/jan/freysoil.jpg
Caption: Collecting soil samples.
Credit: Courtesy of Serita Frey
Watch Serita Frey describe her research: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0XpJdPRROw&list=PLAAADC61677E4780B&index=12

The University of New Hampshire, founded in 1866, is a world-class public research university with the feel of a New England liberal arts college. A land, sea, and space-grant university, UNH is the state's flagship public institution, enrolling 12,200 undergraduate and 2,300 graduate students.

Beth Potier | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.unh.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Oceans may be large, overlooked source of hydrogen gas
21.07.2016 | Duke University

nachricht Groundwater discharge to upper Colorado River Basin varies in response to drought
21.07.2016 | US Geological Survey

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forschen in 15 Kilometern Höhe - Einsatz des Flugzeuges HALO wird weiter gefördert

Das moderne Höhen-Forschungsflugzeug HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) wird auch in Zukunft für Projekte zur Atmosphären- und Erdsystemforschung eingesetzt werden können: Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) bewilligte jetzt Fördergelder von mehr als 11 Millionen Euro für die nächste Phase des HALO Schwerpunktprogramms (SPP 1294) in den kommenden drei Jahren. Die Universität Leipzig ist neben der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der Technischen Universität Dresden federführend bei diesem DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm.

Die Universität Leipzig wird von der Fördersumme knapp 6 Millionen Euro zur Durchführung von zwei Forschungsprojekten mit HALO sowie zur Deckung der hohen...

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Rekord in der Hochdruckforschung: 1 Terapascal erstmals erreicht und überschritten

Einem internationalen Forschungsteam um Prof. Dr. Natalia Dubrovinskaia und Prof. Dr. Leonid Dubrovinsky von der Universität Bayreuth ist es erstmals gelungen, im Labor einen Druck von 1 Terapascal (= 1.000.000.000.000 Pascal) zu erzeugen. Dieser Druck ist dreimal höher als der Druck, der im Zentrum der Erde herrscht. Die in 'Science Advances' veröffentlichte Studie eröffnet neue Forschungsmöglichkeiten für die Physik und Chemie der Festkörper, die Materialwissenschaft, die Geophysik und die Astrophysik.

Extreme Drücke und Temperaturen, die im Labor mit hoher Präzision erzeugt und kontrolliert werden, sind ideale Voraussetzungen für die Physik, Chemie und...

Im Focus: Graphen von der Rolle: Serienfertigung von Elektronik aus 2D-Nanomaterialien

Graphen, Kohlenstoff in zweidimensionaler Struktur, wird seit seiner Entdeckung im Jahr 2004 als ein möglicher Werkstoff der Zukunft gehandelt: Sein geringes Gewicht, die extreme Festigkeit, vor allem aber seine hohe thermische und elektrische Leitfähigkeit wecken Hoffnungen, Graphen bald für vollkommen neue Geräte und Technologien einsetzen zu können. Einen ersten Schritt gehen jetzt die Forscher im EU-Forschungsprojekt »HEA2D«: Ziel ist es, das 2D-Nanomaterial von einer Kupferfolie durch ein Rolle-zu-Rolle-Verfahren auf Kunststofffolien und -bauteile zu übertragen. Auf diese Weise soll eine Serienfertigung elektronischer und opto-elektronischer Komponenten auf Graphenbasis möglich werden.

Besonders interessiert an hochleistungsfähiger Elektronik aus 2D-Materialien ist die Automobilindustrie, die diese in Schaltern mit transparenten Leiterbahnen,...

Im Focus: Menschen können einzelnes Photon sehen

Forscher am Wiener Institut für Molekulare Pathologie (IMP) und an der Rockefeller University in New York wiesen erstmals nach, dass Menschen ein einzelnes Photon wahrnehmen können. Für ihre Experimente verwendeten sie eine Quanten-Lichtquelle und kombinierten sie mit einem ausgeklügelten psycho-physikalischen Ansatz. Das Wissenschaftsjournal “Nature Communications” veröffentlicht die Ergebnisse in seiner aktuellen Ausgabe.

Trotz zahreicher Studien, die seit über siebig Jahren zu diesem Thema durchgeführt wurden, konnte die absolute Untergrenze der menschlichen Sehfähigkeit bisher...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Das neue Präventionsgesetz aktiv gestalten

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Kamera für unsichtbare Felder

22.07.2016 | Physik Astronomie

3-D-Analyse von Materialien: Saarbrücker Forscher erhält renommierten US-Preis für sein Lebenswerk

22.07.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Signale der Hirnflüssigkeit steuern das Verhalten von Stammzellen im Gehirn

22.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie